We’re continuing to offer Mendeley Institutional Edition benefits

You may have seen some recent posts about Mendeley Institutional Edition (MIE) benefits no longer being offered. We’d like to reassure all our users that this is not the case.

MIE customers will continue to receive their existing benefits, which will be integrated into our core Elsevier institutional offering. Our communication around this has not been as clear as we would have liked, for which we apologize. We are getting in touch with all our MIE customers with more detailed information.

To be clear: nothing is changing for our MIE customers, and we’re committed to continuing to support them.

Mendeley is a key part of Elsevier’s range of services for researchers, and we continue to invest heavily in its on-going development. All of our 10 million registered users are important to us, and we always develop with you in mind. We continue to bring researchers new and improved solutions and tools. This month, for example, we have added new data metrics and made it possible to preview 3D files in datasets in Mendeley Data Repository. We have lots of other exciting updates happening across Mendeley over the coming weeks and months, including new reference management tools (be sure to keep an eye on this blog to learn more).

Mendeley remains committed to supporting the academic community and we look forward to continuing to work together with all our users.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact Mendeley Support.

Mendeley advisor of the month: Eko Sumartono, SP., M.Sc

Eko

Eko Sumartono is a researcher at the Department of Agribusiness, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Bengkulu. Eko was born to a family of teachers and farmers: “Our life was very simple at that time. I was born in a city full of history, and a long coastal area, namely Bengkulu, Indonesia. Beginning in 1999, I migrated to the City of Education in Java, namely the Special Region of Yogyakarta. From this city I know a lot of variety and knowledge. I continued with the College in one of the Agribusiness Study Programs, Faculty of Agriculture, Muhammadiyah University of Yogyakarta. It took me four years to graduate with a good title of GPA 3.26. As long as I go to school in Yogyakarta, with a hobby in agriculture, I manage a small shop by peddling modern-style dishes. Furthermore, I also work part-time by managing the menu of agricultural products to be healthy and inexpensive food for other students.”
Eko completed a Masters of Agribusiness Management (on Tobacco Research) at Gadjah Mada University, and in 2015 he took his existing theoretical and practical knowledge and started teaching in one of the Agribusiness Programs in the Department of Social Economics, University of Bengkulu. “Mendeley really helps me, and I can transmit the benefits and functions of this Mendeley tool in order to progress my research with friends of research collaboration in Indonesia and abroad.”

What motivates you in your work?

“I found that one of the visions of the university where I work is to become a world-class university in 2025, so my way to improve the knowledge and standard of living of others is by providing the best convenience for them to share my knowledge. This is what calls me to be a part of it by using Mendeley tools. I believe that our country needs a better place for its citizens. Through this role, I can be part of this very valuable mission.

What sort of work environment suits you best?

“I used to work in several types of work environment, and I enjoyed new things from each of these conditions. I can say that actually I don’t have a particular preference about the work environment. I just like working with people who are highly committed to doing extraordinary things and have responsibility for their work.”

What’s been your experience of using Mendeley?

“I learned about Mendeley just six months ago with friends at Indonesian Journal Volunteers. At that time I was taught to use these tools by Supriyono, M.Sc and then I learned from various friends until I also had to study and I also had to pass on a little knowledge that I had.”

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

“Researchers who have the concept of the future and life without looking back from the background.”

What book are you reading at the moment?

“”The Earth of Mankind”. In this book, Minke also experienced an inner conflict about his views on education and its influence in changing human degrees. Interestingly, this book combines Indonesian history and romance that is integrated in a harmonious story.”

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

“Learning to share time is all important, and sharing is beautiful.”

 

You can find out more about Mendeley at www.mendeley.com

Meet the team: Heather Williams

Heather Williams

Job title

Sr. Product Manager for Mendeley Careers

Introduction

I studied as a psychologist and majored in human-technology interaction (human factors). My first job was at the US DOD Human Systems Analyst Centers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Case in Ohio. Later I moved to LexisNexis, inspired by what I heard a couple of my grad school mates were doing there, I wanted to do that too. While I was at LexisNexis I learned of a User-Centered Design Group at Elsevier and I felt interested in creating designs for doctors, nurses and researchers and applied to move. I interviewed nine times and even created a prototype to get a position there, which worked. While at Elsevier, I got the opportunity to work in nearly each business unit in the company, and I’ve interviewed hundreds of our users in multiple fields and disciplines in health, science, technology and engineering.

After thirteen years, I relocated to Amsterdam from New York, still doing user understanding and design, but I moved in to an R&D group. While in this group I switched careers and moved into product management. I was now working with other designers and other disciplines. During this period, I got involved with a concept that developed into a full product launch – Mendeley Careers. I stayed with it. That launch moved me officially to Mendeley. Nearly nineteen years later, I still love working in this company.

But I also enjoy other fun stuff – making new memories with my family and friends over food and/or travel. I learned to enjoy running. I love to go to gigs. I like to ski when I can get to snow & altitude. I laugh easily and really like experiencing good design in all its forms.

When did you join Mendeley?

1 December 2016

What do you love most about your job?

I love all of it the most. I literally believe in the power of human connection to the users I serve and their connection to improvement of society and our planet.

What book did you most recently read?

The Platform Revolution. It was really good, but I should find something else to read next.

What’s one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

We believe in you. That might sound a bit cheesy, but helping others make improvements, increasing knowledge, is what motivates me so much about my role here at Mendeley.

How would you explain your job to a stranger on a bus?

I help researchers make better connections between their work and others. Hopefully it increases their chances for better collaboration and other research opportunities to help them move their work forward.

What’s the most exciting part of your job?

The problems we help solve.

What keeps you awake at night?

I sleep really well. Solutions to complicated problems often get resolved in my dreams. So I like my sleep ☺

The importance of interoperability

We recognize that interoperability is vitally important to Mendeley users. Our users should be able to easily integrate what they are doing on Mendeley with other applications and tools. We also want to ensure that this workflow experience is seamless: moving from our platform to one that you use for different tasks should be quick and simple to do.

To help achieve this, we’ve always had and will continue to have an open public API (application programming interface). Many companies and developers use our API, because it’s the most stable way for them to integrate their products with Mendeley. Organizations like F1000, the Centre for Open Science (COS) and Altmetric.com have been using it freely for many years. We’re committed to maintaining this open API for third party developers. It’s available at https://dev.mendeley.com/

Last year, a Mendeley update went live that had the unintentional consequence of hindering interoperability. We made a change to the Mendeley Desktop application that broke some integrations with users’ local Mendeley database, including Zotero’s import tool, which resulted in it not working with Mendeley. We’re really sorry about this — it was never our intention to break these integrations and we should have picked this up in release testing.

We’ve heard a lot from our users about this and our team has been working behind the scenes on two things.

First, we clearly heard from users that they want to be more in control of how and when they can export their PDFs, annotations and highlights directly from Mendeley. Improvements were released in Mendeley Desktop version 1.19.3 and further improvements to the export process will be released as part of Mendeley Desktop version 1.19.4.

Second, we’ll work to release a long-term stable Zotero integration. This solution will be available in the 1.19.5 release of Mendeley Desktop towards the middle of this year. We’ll let everyone know the exact dates that this will go live as soon as we can. To be clear, users can still move their libraries to Zotero, it’s just that they can’t do it using the Zotero importer tool. Click here to find out how.

I must say a big thank you to the users who’ve spoken to us in detail about these issues. They’ve helped us better understand how they’re using and interacting with our platform. We’ve updated our procedures to incorporate this feedback, including improving our Customer Support information and services; and we’ve reviewed our testing procedures for new releases. Mendeley Desktop users can also get previews of upcoming releases by signing up for development releases in Mendeley Desktop if they want to, which makes new features and updates available before we roll them out more widely.

I’m excited by the developments we have in the pipeline. Our team is working hard to deliver these as soon as we can.

Laura Thomson, Head of Reference Management