Enjoy an easy and fast route to published journal articles

Get Full Text Research (GetFTR) is an exciting new collaboration that provides researchers with more seamless access to journal articles directly through online research platforms, without any need to use multiple login methods.

The initial pilot has just launched on Mendeley as well as other scholarly platforms, and at present highlights entitlement rights and provides fast links from five major publishers: the American Chemical Society, Elsevier, Springer Nature, Taylor & Francis Group and Wiley. More publishers are expected to join this initial group soon. You might already be able to try GetFTR on Mendeley if your institution has signed up to the relevant access services.

Here’s how it works: Imagine you’re searching for a journal article on Mendeley, GetFTR will add a “View PDF” link beside every article that’s included in your institution’s journal subscriptions. If you’ve recently authenticated at your institution, simply click the link and it will take you straight to the full-text article. If you haven’t authenticated recently, you’ll be directed to your institution’s login page to check your credentials. Providing quick and easy access to knowledge, even when you’re off campus, is now even more important than ever.

GetFTR in action

This pilot will be used to gather feedback on the new service – assessing its accuracy, effectiveness and technical robustness – in order to better meet the needs of researchers. Simultaneously, more research solutions are working on integrating GetFTR.

Elsevier is excited to be part of Get Full Text Research as a publisher and provider of research solutions. We hope Mendeley users who are part of the pilot will enjoy the direct route to articles, and look forward to hearing from you. Please do get in touch with any questions or feedback at support@getfulltextresearch.com.

Mendeley’s participation in this initiative is part of a wider aim to support researchers to easily discover and seamlessly access relevant research. Researchers can visit Mendeley to search over 100million cross-publisher articles, get 1-click access to over 70million PDFs where available and benefit from readership insights and relevant further reading recommendations. Find out more here.

The 2020 vision of you

How to stand out with a Mendeley profile

Making sure that potential collaborators, funders, employers and institutional leaders can find and see the real you is key to a successful research career.

With a Mendeley profile you can easily present a highly visible and accurate picture of who you are as a researcher. This includes showcasing your research objectives, the impact of your work, and other accomplishments alongside your publications and additional citation metrics. Telling the complete story of you and your research in one place is a great way to stand out.

Sign up for a Mendeley profile

Here are four easy ways you can use your Mendeley profile to showcase your achievements and impact:

1. Go beyond the metrics.Profile image (5)
Stand out to funders, peers, employers and institutional leaders by adding a clear personal mission statement, the outcome or societal impact of a recent project in your “About” description. Top tip: making this description at least 200 words increases the findability of your profile in searches.

2. Your best interests at heart.
Make it easy for potential collaborators with similar interests to find you by regularly updating the clickable, searchable “Research interests” keywords.

3. Put a face to a name.
Help others relate to the real person behind the facts. Adding a profile picture improves the impact of your profile.

Profile image (6)4. Better connected.
Keep your publications and all associated metrics up to date, and make your profile a one-stop place where others can see all the information about the societal, academic and collegial impact of your work. Simply connect your Mendeley profile to your Scopus Author Profile to autofill your “Publications” and “Impact” sections.

It’s now also easier for visitors to your profile to quickly access your research via the new “View PDF” button, which appears alongside each available publication in your profile and links straight through to the full article.

These are just some of the ways Mendeley profiles have recently been improved to help you stand out in an increasingly competitive world. Even if you’ve had a Mendeley profile for years, check out the new look – you’re bound to see something you want to use to present the right 2020 vision of you.

View your Mendeley profile

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Mendeley profiles are just one of the ways in which Mendeley supports you in your research career. Find out what more it can help you do – from managing references, to staying up to date with the latest research, to finding funding opportunities – by visiting mendeley.com

Importing references just got even easier: introducing the new Mendeley Web Importer

Mendeley Web Importer Chrome DesktopFor the past decade, Mendeley Web Importer has been vital for busy researchers, making it easy to add articles from across the internet to their reference library.

Today, we’re pleased to announce an all-new version, with new features and a refreshed design. The new Mendeley Web Importer is available for both Google Chrome and Firefox.

What’s new?

Rebuilt for reliability and flexibility

Mendeley Web Importer has been completely rebuilt to ensure rock-solid reliability in finding relevant references and uploading them to your Mendeley library.

The new version also lets you get on with other work while uploads are in progress. It can keep uploading PDFs to your Mendeley library even if you close the window or switch tabs.

Preview the full text before adding it to your library

Everyone’s workflow is different. If you prefer to scan the full text before deciding to add it to your Mendeley library, now you can simply select ‘View PDF’ in the Mendeley Web Importer interface. The PDF will open within Elsevier’s enhanced PDF reader, adding navigational shortcuts and clickable elements to the full texts. More enhancements are planned too, so keep an eye out for future announcements.

Mendeley Web Importer preview PDF

 

Organize your PDFs into collections and share them with groups

The redesigned interface makes it clearer and easier to add references directly to the collections and groups in your Mendeley library. Mendeley Web Importer now also remembers the last collection you selected, saving you time.

Get more full texts than ever before

We’ve introduced new technology to enable the retrieval of even more full-text PDFs. That means that when you use Mendeley Web Importer, you can have total confidence that you’re getting everything you need.

If your account is authenticated to a registered institutional network, Mendeley Web Importer also retrieves full texts from publisher sites, including ScienceDirect, Wiley Online, Taylor and Francis Online, and SpringerLink.

Huge accessibility improvements

It’s important that everyone can navigate Mendeley Web Importer in the way that’s best for them. If the keyboard is the right tool for you, you can now simply select either Ctrl-Shift-S on your PC or Cmd-Shift-S on your Mac to import references and full texts using only the keyboard.

No more waiting for version updates

Websites change all the time. To ensure constant compatibility, we have a responsive development strategy for Mendeley Web Importer.

To ensure your version doesn’t fall behind, meaning a sub-optimal experience for you, we now automatically cascade updates to your browser as soon as they are available.

Get started with Mendeley Web Importer

To get started, simply visit www.mendeley.com/reference-management/web-importer.

For Google Chrome, if you already have the earlier version of Mendeley Web Importer installed, the new version will overwrite the existing version automatically.

For Firefox, you will need to uninstall the previous version and install the new one.

We expect to release ports to Microsoft Edge and Safari later in 2020.

What’s next?

The new Mendeley Web Importer is designed to save you time and simplify your research workflow.

We always welcome your feedback on how to improve our solutions and services, so do let us know your thoughts on the new Mendeley Web Importer using our feedback form or using the ‘Send feedback’ link in the new Web Importer settings page.

___________________________________________________________________________

Mendeley Web Importer is just one of Mendeley’s reference management tools available to help you build your knowledge. Find out more about reference management from Mendeley here.

Looking for advice on effectively building your knowledgebase? Take a look at this Elsevier Connect article on key steps to collecting and organizing research.

What were the most popular papers of 2019?

Mendeley 2019 Papers Image“Best of the year” lists always catch our eye. They’re a great way to check if we missed any important movies, books or news. They also show us what our peers focused on and suggest trends for the coming year.

In that spirit, we’ve compiled this list of the most popular papers of 2019. These open access articles were trending in the Mendeley Catalog in 2019, meaning that they had the largest growth in readership over the course of the year.

There’s one paper across eight major disciplines of science: computer science; education; physics and astronomy; environmental science; medicine; neuroscience; chemistry; and material science. It’s fascinating to see the range of topics of interest across these disciplines, including artificial intelligence, conservation, memory and process improvement.

The Mendeley Catalog is an ever-growing resource that currently contains over 300 million research papers. You can search the entire Catalog using the search tool that appears in the main toolbar in your Mendeley.com interface. You can also get personalized recommendations of new papers to read from Mendeley Suggest by creating a Mendeley account.

Computer Science

Methods for interpreting and understanding deep neural networks
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/methods-interpreting-understanding-deep-neural-networks/

Abstract extract:
“This paper provides an entry point to the problem of interpreting a deep neural network model and explaining its predictions […] The set of methods covered here is not exhaustive, but sufficiently representative to discuss a number of questions in interpretability, technical challenges, and possible applications.”

Computer Science Figure
Fig. 8. Simple Taylor decomposition applied to a convolutional DNN trained on MNIST, and resulting explanations. Red and blue colors indicate positive and negative relevance scores.

 

Education

The Use of Cronbach’s Alpha When Developing and Reporting Research Instruments in Science Education
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/cronbachs-alpha-developing-reporting-research-instruments-science-education/

Abstract extract:
“Cronbach’s alpha is a statistic commonly quoted by authors to demonstrate that tests and scales that have been constructed or adopted for research projects are fit for purpose […] This article explores how this statistic is used in reporting science education research and what it represents.”

Physics and Astronomy

Theory of dynamic critical phenomena
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/theory-dynamic-critical-phenomena/

Abstract extract:
“When a system is brought to a critical phase transition, such as the gas-liquid critical point where the density difference between liquid and gas disappears, or the Curie point of a ferromagnet where the spontaneous magnetization disappears, many of its properties exhibit singular behavior.”

Environmental Science

Human–Wildlife Conflict and Coexistence
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/humanwildlife-conflict-coexistence/

Abstract extract:
“Recent advances in our understanding of conflict have led to a growing number of positive conservation and coexistence outcomes. I summarize and synthesize factors that contribute to conflict, approaches that mitigate conflict and encourage coexistence, and emerging trends and debates.”

Medicine

Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980: A pooled analysis of 751 population-based studies with 4.4 million participants
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/worldwide-trends-diabetes-since-1980-pooled-analysis-751-populationbased-studies-44-million-particip/

Abstract extract:
“One of the global targets for non-communicable diseases is to halt, by 2025, the rise in the age standardised adult prevalence of diabetes at its 2010 levels. We aimed to estimate worldwide trends in diabetes, how likely it is for countries to achieve the global target, and how changes in prevalence, together with population growth and ageing, are affecting the number of adults with diabetes.”

Medicine Figure
Figure 7.

 

Neuroscience

Competition between engrams influences fear memory formation and recall
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/competition-between-engrams-influences-fear-memory-formation-recall/

Abstract extract:
“Collections of cells called engrams are thought to represent memories. Although there has been progress in identifying and manipulating single engrams, little is known about how multiple engrams interact to influence memory. In lateral amygdala (LA), neurons with increased excitability during training outcompete their neighbors for allocation to an engram. We examined whether competition based on neuronal excitability also governs the interaction between engrams.”

Chemistry

The state of understanding of the lithium-ion-battery graphite solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and its relationship to formation cycling
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/state-understanding-lithiumionbattery-graphite-solid-electrolyte-interphase-sei-relationship-formati/

Abstract extract:
“An in-depth historical and current review is presented on the science of lithium-ion battery (LIB) solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation on the graphite anode, including structure, morphology, composition, electrochemistry, and formation mechanism.”

Chemistry figure
Fig. 1. Energetics of the formation of the anode and cathode SEI layers under electroreduction and electro-oxidation conditions [21]. “Reprinted (adapted) with permission from (Goodenough, J. B.; Kim, Y. Chemistry of Materials 2010, 22, 587). Copyright (2010) American Chemical Society.”

Material Science

Surface texture metrology for metal additive manufacturing: a review
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/surface-texture-metrology-metal-additive-manufacturing-review/

Abstract extract:
“A comprehensive analysis of literature pertaining to surface texture metrology for metal additive manufacturing has been performed. This review paper structures the results of this analysis into sections that address specific areas of interest: industrial domain; additive manufacturing processes and materials; types of surface investigated; surface measurement technology and surface texture characterisation.”

Material Science figure
Fig. 4. A typical truncheon artefact [49].Enter a caption

Find more papers of interest by searching the Mendeley Catalog at Mendeley.com.

Register with or sign in to Mendeley to get personalized recommendations for papers from Mendeley Suggest.

Join the Mendeley Advisors

Mendeley Advisor Community logo_ColorIn 2019, we welcomed tens of thousands of new users to Mendeley and the magic of good reference management. When it comes to discovering the platform, one of the best ways is through our brilliant Mendeley Advisor Community, which goes beyond recommendation to support users worldwide.

We are actively recruiting new Advisors for 2020. Could you be the next great Mendeley Advisor?

The Mendeley Advisor Community includes people from all over the world. Most Advisors are PhD students and early-career lecturers, but the community also includes librarians, tenured professors, government lab employees and corporate researchers.

Mendeley Advisors are the voice of Mendeley on campus, helping their peers use its great features to save time and reduce stress levels. They share their knowledge of Mendeley in classes, office hours and fun events on campus!

In 2019, the Advisors spread their love of Mendeley in all sorts of ways, including:

Besides the satisfaction that comes from helping your peers, Advisors receive a whole range of benefits, such as:

  • Increased free library storage
  • A coveted Mendeley T-shirt
  • Giveaways for your workshops
  • Invitations for speaking opportunities and to be profiled on Elsevier blogs
  • Sneak previews of new Mendeley products and features
  • A certificate to acknowledge your contribution to the community
  • Support, advice and collateral from the Mendeley Community team
  • Invitations to do UX and BETA testing, so you can be part of Mendeley’s development

It’s so easy to apply to be a Mendeley Advisor: just click here.

We’re looking forward to welcoming you to the Community.

Explore mindfulness to improve your research–life balance

The human mind can be trained to cope with and relieve stress. This training is called mindfulness. By increasing awareness of thoughts and emotions in a given moment, it helps to avoid getting carried away. Mindfulness is proven to improve mental and even physical health – and now Elsevier’s Researcher Academy is bringing mindfulness to researchers in a brand-new module.

See the new Mindfulness module

Elsevier-ResearchersAcademy-August2019-1_10-v2C

Why is mindfulness important to researchers? The work of a researcher can feel overwhelming. The pressures associated with funding, competition and deadlines can affect a researcher’s wellbeing and peace of mind. In turn, this can mean a poorer work–life balance, reduced work efficiency and burnout. Mindfulness can help researchers take charge over their own lives.

The new Researcher Academy module will explore the practice of mindfulness in coping with stress as well as improving mental health and overall wellbeing. It will include an exploration of the scientific background of the practice and step-by-step guide to mindfulness in daily research routines.

The Mindfulness module will go live on 14 November at 11:00 a.m. (UTC). Register today!

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Get more career guidance from Elsevier’s Research Academy here

Find out how to unlock your research potential with Elsevier’s Researcher Academy here

Advisor of the month: Virginia Ballance

Virginia BallanceVirginia Ballance is the Nursing and Health Sciences Librarian at the University of The Bahamas. She works in the Hilda Bowen Library at the nursing school campus in downtown Nassau Bahamas.

How did you get into your field?
I loved studying and working in the library while I was at university and after graduate school studies sort of moved seamlessly into librarianship.

Where do you do work best?
In the library.

How long have you been using Mendeley?
I set up an account several years ago mostly to try it out. Last year the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research suggested I offer a workshop on reference management – we selected Mendeley because of the great features.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?
Years ago I used EndNote but in recent years, embarrassed to say, I wasn’t using anything…

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?
The Mendeley Advisor programme encouraged me to really learn to use the product and exploit all its features as well as providing me with the training materials (presentations that could be customized, posters and certificates) needed to run a workshop. Being an Advisor puts you in contact with a fabulous group of Mendeley users all over the world to share experiences using Mendeley. There are other great benefits such as having a larger account size and greater number of Mendeley groups.

Which researcher would you most like to work with, dead or alive?
Hard question – to be honest, I really enjoy working with the students and faculty here at the University of The Bahamas.

What book are you reading at the moment?
Homo Deus by Yuval Noah Harari and about 10 other books…

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?
I discovered Google Crisis Maps. This is a special project which gives access to satellite images and maps specifically for emergency situations. I was amazed to see details of the extent of the devastation on the two islands in the Bahamas that were hit by Hurricane Dorian on September 1, 2019. https://www.google.org/crisismap/weather_and_events

What’s the best part about working in research?
Seeing your name in print! Getting cited!

And the most challenging part about working in research?
Procrastination. Making time in the day or the week to work on writing especially when there are so many distractions.

What’s the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?
It can make your scholarly writing so much easier…

Do you have any advice for young researchers?
Absolutely – be brave, go to conferences, present your ideas, network, work with your colleagues, and let the librarians in your institution know what you are working on.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Watch Virginia give advice on the best methods and tools to effectively collect, organize and retrieve a personal knowledge base as part of Elsevier’s recent Build My Knowledge webinar

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here

Efficiently building knowledge

By: Louise Springthorpe

BMK webinar image 2How much time do you spend adding to your knowledge base? Consider all the tasks involved: searching for data and literature; evaluating their relevance; downloading what you need; and then organizing everything, including your own experimental data, so that you can always find and share a given piece of information when it’s required.

We estimate that researchers spend one to two days per week on such tasks. Fortunately, there are ways to increase efficiency, leaving more time to focus on research projects.

One way is ensuring that information is easy to discover. Elsevier’s research solutions, like ScienceDirect, Scopus, Reaxys and Engineering Village, access high-quality collections of literature and data indexed with dedicated taxonomies. Articles and books are available in electronic formats to support efficient review, and data export is possible in a range of formats suitable for further analytics.

Mendeley is a popular and user-friendly platform for creating your own library. Its collaborative features allow multiple researchers to annotate documents and share information. Elsevier is also refining our text mining tools to improve library searching. For more reliable data capture, management and storage, we offer an ELN and cloud-based platforms, including Mendeley Data.

These cutting-edge solutions reflect Elsevier’s promise to build an ecosystem of solutions and services that help researchers achieve their goals more efficiently.

Join our Build My Knowledge: Effectively collect, organize and retrieve your personal knowledge base webinar where 3 fellow researchers will discuss how they effectively collect, organize and retrieve their personal knowledge base and provide insights on how they keep themselves organized in the era of information overload.

Date: Tuesday 10th September
Time: 10am Los Angeles, 1pm New York, 6pm London

Register here

BMK webinar image 1

Meet the Mendeley Data advisory board: Amy Neeser

In this series of interviews, we meet some of the members of the Mendeley Data advisory board and get their thoughts on the role of research data management (RDM), and how Mendeley Data can contribute to this.

Amy NeeserName: Amy Neeser

Job Title: Consulting and Outreach Lead at University California Berkeley (UC Berkeley)

Bio: Amy is a data librarian working in Research IT. She coordinates the consulting efforts across the Data Management and Research Computing programs to offer a holistic approach to data and computation. She also facilitates their community, partnership, and outreach programs. She previously worked as the Research Data Management Program Manager at UC Berkeley, as Data Curation Librarian at the University of Michigan, and as a science librarian at the University of Minnesota.

What motivates you each morning?

I am passionate about research. I love that I get to help enable world changing research by helping Berkeley faculty, students, and staff address the challenges and opportunities associated with research data and computing.

What challenges do you want to see RDM fix?

There are two main things really. In terms of practicality, I would love to see RDM really focus on sensitive data needs. Currently this is often managed at an institutional level, but it would make a huge impact if there was a nationwide, or product-based solution that could address this. That would be huge.

Secondly, I think RDM is vital for reproducibility. Technologies like containers and Jupyter Notebooks enable users to share not only their data but also the software, versions, and specs to analyze it. As these types of technologies data management practices become more commonly used, it will be much easier to share and reproduce results!

What excites you most about Mendeley Data?

I like how the different modules and features available can easily interact with each other. And it’s practical, supporting the data management process.

I feel that Mendeley Data Repository can help institutions address the reproducibility crisis, and it can save the need for institutions to create a repository at a local level.

What do you think the future holds for RDM?

I don’t think RDM can or should be “owned” by one unit or department, such as the library. It’s too big an area to be managed alone, and different players bring difference expertise and experience. It calls for a combined effort.

A lot of the questions that I get are in the active phase of the research lifecycle and often include sensitive data. IT can help with these issues, but also needs the library’s expertise around the beginning (planning, finding) and end (publishing, sharing, preserving) of the research lifecycle to provide researchers with a holistic approach to their scholarship.

More researchers from across domains use data and computational resources, and I think IT must be closely aligned with the library and other important players on campus such as the office of research.

 

Find out more about Mendeley Data here.

Meet other members of the Mendeley Data advisory board here.

Meet the Mendeley Data advisory board: David Groenewegen

In this series of interviews, we meet some of the members of the Mendeley Data advisory board and get their thoughts on the role of research data management (RDM), and how Mendeley Data can contribute to this.

David GroenewegenName: David Groenewegen

Job Title: Director, Research, Monash University Library

Bio: David Groenewegen is the Director, Research. He is responsible for Library client services to the science, technology, engineering and medicine disciplines at Monash University, as well as the contribution the Library makes to the University’s research activity.

David has wide-ranging experience working in the areas of electronic information provision and related technology. Before returning to Monash University Library in 2013 he spent four years as a Director of the Australian National Data Service, where he was involved with the development and implementation of data management solutions across the Australian university sector.

What motivates you each morning?

The thing I most love doing is trying to find ways to help our researchers do their job better, which in the library means giving them the tools, training and resources they need, at the time they need it, and in ways that simplifies their life, not complicates it. I’ve been lucky to have the chance to try lots of new and cool things in my career, and I’m always looking for the next one.

What challenges do you want to see RDM fix?

I want things to become frictionless. I’d like to see software that’s smart enough to understand the subtleties of where data is stored and create that connect with other software and processes throughout the researcher lifecycle. This would really help to overcome the messiness caused by having information all over the place.

What excites you most about Mendeley Data?

One valuable thing that Mendeley Data is trying to address is how to bring data together, and manage it in a consistent end-to-end way. But for me, the modular aspect of Mendeley Data is the most exciting part. You’re not locked into one solution, instead you’re able to plug in different Mendeley Data modules into your own workflows – it’s the way universities like ours want to work

What do you think the future holds for RDM?

The need for RDM is well known, but there are still a lot of people struggling with finding the most frictionless way of doing things. Bespoke software might appear to be the best solution, but often this won’t work fantastically well, as integrating new processes into existing workflows isn’t easy. RDM isn’t as simple as storing data in a repository. I’m seeing growing recognition of the need to curate data and package it up for later use, so that others can get a decent answer out of it. Most of the tools currently available don’t support this very well.

Following on from this, long-term curation and management of shared data is also a key area I’d like to see develop. What was considered a lot of data 10 years ago isn’t now, but it’s not feasible to continue buying more storage so that we can keep everything just in case. Improving metadata goes a long way towards addressing this as it enables you to make quick decisions later on, but I’d like to see new processes developed that help us to identify if we no longer require to hold certain data.

 
Find out more about Mendeley Data here.

Meet other members of the Mendeley Data advisory board here.