Advisor of the Month – Devarajan Rathish

Meet Devarajan Rathish, our July Advisor of the Month! 

Advisor of the Month - Devarajan Rathish
Advisor of the Month – Devarajan Rathish

Dr. Devarajan Rathish is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, located in the Anuradhapura district in North Central Sri Lanka. He studied medicine (MBBS), completed his master’s degree in public health (MPH) at EUCLID University and obtained a master of philosophy (MPhil) at the Rajarata University of Sri Lanka.

How did you get into your field?

I like teaching, treating, and researching. Also, I had a passion to work in a rural region of my country. Therefore, I choose to become a Lecturer in a faculty of medicine located in a rural region. And, now I am happy teaching medical students, treating patients, and doing research in Anuradhapura. My fields of interest are Pharmacology, Primary Care, Public Health, and Medical Ethics. 

Where do you do work the best?

I feel fortunate to work in fields that focus on broader aspects of medicine. It has given me an opportunity to achieve a diversity of knowledge. Further, I prefer to work in an environment where my teammates have competency, a strong sense of companionship, and a good work ethic. 

How long have you been using Mendeley?

I have been using Mendeley for six years. Since June 2015, I have been a Mendeley Advisor. I am happy to have introduced Mendeley to many undergraduates, postgraduates, and academic staff members of Sri Lanka. 

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I used to make references manually. Thanks to my Mendeley advisor Dr. Buddhika Wijerathne (my previous colleague and now a general practitioner at Ropes Crossing Medical Practice, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia), I could learn Mendeley at the very beginning of my career. 

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

To share the treasure that I found – “Mendeley”. The need for Mendeley was felt by many of my academic colleagues who are involved in research work. Also, annual workshops on Mendeley had to be conducted as part of the “Research in medicine” module for the 3rd year medical undergraduates at the university. Thus, my role as an official Mendeley advisor was important. I extend my gratitude to the team Mendeley for extending their continuous support. They register my workshops on time and provide useful materials and merchandise as well. 

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

I would like to meet and work with Dr. David Nalin, Professor Emeritus, Center for Immunology and Microbial Diseases, Albany Medical College. He along with Dr. Richard Cash, and their colleagues “successfully tested the efficacy of an oral glucose-electrolyte solution, later known as oral rehydration therapy (ORT), to be used instead of intravenous fluid for the treatment of patients with severe cholera”. The Lancet called it “… possibly the greatest medical discovery of this century. And, the UNICEF describes its value as follows: “no other single medical breakthrough of the 20th century has the potential to prevent so many deaths, over such a short period of time and at so little cost”. The above are compelling reasons for my willingness to meet and work with him. 

What book are you reading at the moment? 

I am reading John Murtagh’s General Practice. The textbook describes the essentials of general practice in depth. It’s a great read for anyone that aspires to progress as a family physician, and I would recommend it to my colleagues and students. 

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

The new variants of Coronavirus. There will be a lot more to learn on the above topic during the next few months as well. 

What is the best part about working in research?

I like reviewing and referencing. It helps me broaden my existing knowledge.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Finding suitable collaborations and research grants have always been a challenge. However, once the above two are finalized the journey is much easier.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is a high-quality reference manager provided free of charge for all. 

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

“Research is seeing what everybody else has seen and thinking what nobody else has thought.” – Albert Szent-Györgyi (1893-1986) 


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor? Learn more about the Advisor Community.

Advisor of the Month – Poorya Davoodi

What is your name and job title?

Poorya Davoodi. I am a student.

Where do you work/study?

I am studying Medical Biotechnology in University of Padova, Italy.

How did you get into your field?

Honestly, I am interested in medical research and would like to know more and more. I can remember clearly when I was very young I would always asked myself why are we here in the world? What is our aim? What do we do?

And then in the 16th year of my life, I found my goal. My goal is to make a better and easier life for people, for myself, and my family.

In 2020, I applied for the University of Padova, and I have obtained the third rank in the entrance exam, and now I am here in Padova. 

How long have you been using Mendeley?

I have used Mendeley for approximately 2 years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I used to use EndNote.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I am a young researcher and when I wanted to learn and start research, I experienced hard days because I did not know what I should do or how I could organize my papers. Mendeley is the best software for the organization of papers. I can manage and cite very easily. It is free and I can have access to files from everywhere. I decided to become an Advisor to share with others this fantastic tool that completely revamped my research!

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I have learned more about COVID-19 and found some components that have positive effects on inflammation of lungs in COVID-19 patients.

What is the best part about working in research?

When I am working on a project, and I try to find something that I did not know before, it is a big challenge. And when I find it, it is the best moment for me.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

The most challenging part is trying to work with participants who do not honestly respond to data collection.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

I have a page on Instagram and each week I post a story and teach Mendeley. People can ask me their questions and I answer as soon as possible.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Do not give up. If you have a goal, follow it. Never give up.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor? Learn more about the Advisor Community.

Advisor of the Month – Beth White

What is your name and job title?

Beth White, Ph.D.; Education Project Manager.

Where do you work/study?

I work for Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

How did you get into your field?

After several years in Educational Development at an R-1 in the southeastern United States, I wanted to transition my skillset into something with broader impacts. When I found this opportunity to assist early career researchers and students in STEM fields while serving a broader focus, I jumped at the chance.

How long have you been using Mendeley?

I have been using Mendeley since 2012, when a good friend introduced me. I moved over to this amazing tool and never looked back!

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I used to use EndNote.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I decided to become an advisor to share with others this fantastic tool that completely revamped my research!

Do you have any tips for training new users on Mendeley?

Don’t ever lose your enthusiasm for Mendeley and never forget what it was like when you didn’t yet understand all of the things this tool helps you do. That way you will be most effective in teaching others to navigate within the platform.

What makes your Mendeley events successful?

I’m still so thankful to have found this tool and so grateful that it is continually updated and evolving based on feedback. I haven’t lost my enthusiasm and I try to pass that along to others and tailor the training to their environment.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

I would love to speak with Geert Kelchtermans and discuss his work in studying the interactions between individual educators and their specific contexts as it relates to lecturer/professor induction in higher education.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I have been reading a lot about the differences in the ways the various COVID vaccines are manufactured. As a result, I have expanded my understanding of biomedical engineering as well as epidemiology.

What is the best part about working in research?

Continuous improvements and discovering new ways to accomplish tasks and promote STEM education.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

The largest challenge is being a social scientist in a STEM environment. However, we are making progress in collaboration and adding a qualitative voice to physical sciences education.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

This research tool will transform and organize your work!

Do you have any advice for young researchers?

Choose a bibliographic organizer and stick with it! Beware that access to products may end with your graduation or, as a faculty member, when you leave a particular institution. Mendeley, and all of the notes and articles you’ve stored there that support your research, goes with you if you relocate.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

How to host a successful Mendeley training event in 5 easy steps

Mendeley’s Advisor program boasts over 5,500 active Advisors in 130 countries around the world. From small agricultural colleges to major international universities, Advisors are enthusiastic “subject-matter experts” on Mendeley’s reference management solutions and are devoted to sharing good research skills with students and researchers in their regions. Mendeley training “events” are the most common way Mendeley Advisors share Mendeley know-how.

So how do you create a successful training event? Here are the key things to know when your organize your first (or 50th) event – plus helpful links and answers to the most frequently asked event questions we receive from Advisors.

Make a plan

Know your audience and their needs.

  • Who will be attending your Mendeley training? The best people to offer Mendeley training to are those in your own department, lab, school, or institution, who are doing academic research and writing theses or articles.
  • What are you going to be sharing in your training? Mendeley offers teaching materials and guides you can share with your attendees. But also listen to your event feedback – are your attendees interested in a specific topic?
  • When will you host your training? Understand your audience and their schedules. Are they full-time students? Do they work? Make sure you pick a time that most of your audience can attend. Offer them enough notice to make a plan.
  • Where will your event be held? Virtual trainings are a flexible option for people who cannot commute or be physically in the same room as you. In-person events require enough space and resources (like electrical outlets, chairs, a projector screen). Hybrid events (virtual and in-person) require attention to detail and possibly an assistant to monitor the virtual event while you address your physical audience.
  • Why does someone need Mendeley training? Maybe they are first-time users or need to know the newest feature updates.
  • How will they benefit from training? Will training help them with their research or to become more organized? Is the training also serving as a networking opportunity?

View our Mendeley training lesson plan

Promote your event

Fist, be sure to register your event. Include all the details that will prepare your audience like what to bring, helpful resources, and what to expect to learn. Also consider including a link to an attendee signup form (using platforms like Microsoft Forms or EventBrite). This allows you to collect contact information you can then use to send event reminders, a post-event thank you message, and build your contact list for future events.

Download an event poster

Request merchandise. In the event registration form you can request free Mendeley give-aways to offer your attendees (please allow 4 weeks’ notice). If your event is virtual, or a hybrid (virtual and in-person), you can request merchandise for all participants, or only those you’ll see in-person. (Note that a few countries’ import regulations limit what you can receive without paying an import tax. We’ll contact you in advance if we know this about your location).

Promote your event on social media by sharing the unique link provided in your event confirmation email.

Create a promotional image with our template

Prepare (practice, practice, practice)

Review the available Mendeley teaching materials and familiarize yourself with the content. You can edit the presentations for your local needs. Set aside time to practice giving your presentation.

Download the participant certification template and fill out your certificates in advance so they are ready to hand out at your event.

Present and teach

Wear some Mendeley gear – a button or a t-shirt will make you feel smarter, we swear – and give yourself enough time to make sure the space is set up well before people start to arrive.

Perk up your virtual classroom with optional Mendeley backgrounds!

Conclude and share

Take the opportunity at the end of your event to ask for feedback about what people have learned and create a way for them to stay engaged. Some ideas:

  • Send a follow up email to your participants thanking them for attending, ask for additional feedback on your performance, the content covered, and what else they want to learn
  • Create an advanced workshop that addresses specific kinds of research or writing
  • Create a social media group where people can ask you questions and collaborate
  • Host a regular Mendeley “office hours” where anyone with questions can drop in for guidance and one-on-one help

Take a photo! Tell everyone in your network about your successful training with a photograph of you presenting, or a group photo with all your participants.

Be sure to share it with us too at community@mendeley.com. It really helps inspire the team behind Mendeley. A photo is a great way to connect everyone in the Mendeley world.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor and hosting your own training event? Sign up to become an Advisor.

Authored by Susan Tyler Jenkins, Researcher Community Advisor

Advisor of the month: Dora Dayu Rahma Turista

What is your name and job title?

My name is Dora Dayu Rahma Turista, I’m a Biology Lecturer.

Where do you work/study?

I work on Medical Laboratory Technology, STIKes Hutama Abdi Husada, Tulungagung, East Java, Indonesia and Biology Education Departemen, Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Mulawarman University, Samarinda, East Borneo, Indonesia.

How did you get into your field?

First I got my Bachelor of Biology from State University of Malang, Indonesia, then I continued my study in the master’s program of Biology Education, also at State University of Malang, Indonesia. After I got a master’s degree, I became a lecturer at the Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, STIKes Hutama Abdi Husada, Tulungagung, Indonesia. And now I am also a lecturer on Biology Education Departement, Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Mulawarman University, Samarinda, Indonesia.

How long have you used Mendeley?

About 3 years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I was using Zotero.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I use Mendeley for writing articles, and as a journal editor, I teach authors to use Mendeley. I also teach Mendeley to my students and my partners.

Do you have a tip when training new users on Mendeley?

I always explain the advantages of Mendeley. I make a tutorial using Mendeley that is equipped with step-by-step images, then I put it into practice. I also give special gifts (special souvenir from Mendeley) for attendees who can use Mendeley well.

What do you hope to achieve this year as an Advisor?

To introduce Mendeley more widely. To become a good and helpful Mendeley advisor, and an advisor of the month. Getting merchandise from Mendeley helps me to introduce Mendeley more widely. Also, I really want to get research funding.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

There is no specific researcher, but I would like to meet and collaborate with researchers in the same field.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

SARS-CoV-2, COVID 19, Education and Colaboration during COVID-19 pandemic.

What is the best part about working in research?

Carrying out the research process and writing scientific papers.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

The research process.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is a magic tool for a researcher, not only as a reference manager tool, but also as social media for researchers who can connect with other researchers around the world and help to promote their publications.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Research is useful when published and Mendeley helps simplify the publication process. Mendeley brings research to life so you can impact tomorrow, and I absolutely agree with it, so use Mendeley for your scientific papers.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Advisor of the Month: William Hoyos

What is your name and job title?

William Hoyos, Ph.D. student in engineering

Where do you work/study?

Universidad EAFIT

How did you get into your field?

First, I studied bacteriology, then I studied systems engineering. I realized the application of engineering to medical problems and decided to pursue a PhD in engineering with an emphasis on artificial intelligence in medicine. Currently, I work on artificial intelligence models for dengue prediction and prescription.

Where do you do your best work?

I believe that my best work is in the application of engineering in medical problem solving. Besides, I am very good at sharing my knowledge with others. It gives me satisfaction and allows me to continue learning.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

About 7 years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I was using EndNote.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I love to teach. I like to share my knowledge with others. I am always willing to share new tools that make the research process easier for my co-workers. I am commonly demonstrating new features released by Mendeley.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

I would like to meet Andrew Ng. World pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence. Ng co-founded Coursera and deeplearning.ai.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, by Yuval Noah Harari.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

The application of fuzzy cognitive maps to assess causality in infectious diseases such as dengue.

What is the best part about working in research?

The positive impact your results generate for humanity.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Getting funding for research.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

A wonderful tool for research. A platform with capabilities to link researchers, organize bibliographic references, share knowledge, among other powerful features of Mendeley.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Yes, have passion and love for what they do. I think these are the two fundamental pillars of success in research.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Advisor of the Month: Adilson Rocha Ferreira

What is your name and job title?

My name is Adilson Rocha Ferreira and I am a researcher and teacher.

Where do you work/study?

Currently, I work at the Education Department of the State of Alagoas, in the Northeast of Brazil, a region well known for its beautiful beaches, natural beauty and a warrior and struggling people since its origins. As a PhD student in Education, I study at the Federal University of Alagoas, Postgraduate Program in Education, Education Center.

How did you get into your field?

I entered the Federal University of Alagoas in the Physical Education Degree course in 2009, finishing it in 2013, and since then I have been improving at other levels. In 2016 I concluded the Specialization Course in Media in Education and then the Master in Education. I am currently a PhD student in Education and in the Pedagogy course as well. In 2015, I obtained approval in a contest to provide places for elementary school teachers and since then I have been teaching Physical Education classes for students from 7 to 12 years old in public schools of the State Department of Education of Alagoas.

Where do you do work the best?

I believe that my best job is to develop research on digital technologies applied in the fields of education and health, with an emphasis on conventional digital games, exergames and gamification, in order to think other ways to learn, teach and exercise with the support of these technologies.

How long have you been using Mendeley?

Around the year 2016, at the beginning of the Master of Education course, I found Mendeley and since then I can’t live without it.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Prior to Mendeley, I had never used any other reference manager, I used to manage files in folders and elaborate citations and references manually, based on several manuals. From the experience with Mendeley, I was able to find others, but none of them captivated me as much as Mendeley!

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

Being part of the Mendeley team was what most instigated me to become a Mendeley Advisor, as it is very gratifying to contribute to Elsevier with feedbacks and promote Mendeley demonstrations for different groups in the academic community.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Currently I already work with researchers in whom I always dreamed of working together, such as Deise Juliana Francisco, Neiza de Lourdes Frederico Fumes, Fernando Silvio Cavalcante Pimentel, Lynn Rosalina Gama Alves, Flávio Anderson Pedrosa de Melo and César Augusto Otero Vaghetti. However, going further, I would like to meet and work with James Paul Gee, Humberto Maturana, Francisco Varela and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, who are scholars on which I base my research.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Silver, C., & Lewins, A. (2014). Using software in qualitative research: a step-by-step guide. 55 City Road, London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I am learning to play guitar. So any note or sound that I manage to make at that initial moment seems to me to be incredible achievements.

What is the best part about working in research?

For me, the best part of working as a team is to learn from the different skills that a team brings together, so that by collaborating with my skills I can learn and develop other skills.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

I continue to follow the same line of reasoning: deal with the difference! Respecting the adversary and knowing how far one can go are challenges that must be managed in group work.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

I would like everyone to know, especially those who are starting courses in higher education, that there is no longer a need to create countless folders and get lost in the middle of several files. With Mendeley, you can collect articles and similar items in one place, in the cloud, and carry with you wherever you go with just a Mendeley account.

Do you have any advice for young researchers?

Be organized in your readings by including Mendeley in your workflow. At first it may seem like extra work, but in the future, it will save many hours of your academic readings and writings.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Advisor of the month: Heidi Jørgensen

What is your name and job title?

My name is Heidi Jørgensen and I am a librarian.

Where do you work?

I work at University College Absalon, Campus Næstved, Denmark.

How did you get into your field?

I graduated in 1996 from The Royal School of Librarianship in Denmark. I was immediately offered a job at a public library but learned quickly that it was the academic part that had my interest. I was employed at The Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library in Copenhagen, both as a librarian but also as a consultant for the institutes. However the capital was not for me, I have therefore been working at University College Absalon for the past 18 years where we educate:
Bachelor in Biomedical Laboratory Science
Bachelor in Nursing
Bachelor in Occupational Therapy
Bachelor in Physiotherapy
Bachelor in Public Administration

Where do you do work the best?

When I am able to help students or teachers find scientific literature on exactly what they are looking for. Seeing that what they learn, allows them to move forward with their projects. For me, it is equally important whether they will learn to search databases such as PubMed, Scopus etc. or whether they will just learn to use Mendeley so they can cite their sources correctly.

How long have you been using Mendeley?

For six years and an advisor for five years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I have used RefMan/EndNote.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I became an advisor because this was the best way for me to get to know all about Mendeley and even to come up with new ideas on how to use it.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Tycho Brahe (1546 –1601). He was a Danish nobleman, astronomer, astrologer, alchemist, and writer known for his accurate and comprehensive astronomical observations.
Tycho was also famous for his contributions to medicine; his herbal medicines were in use as late as the 1900s. This is where we have a common interest and it would have been a privilege to learn from him.
We also have an expression in Scandinavia “Tycho Brahe days” which refers to a number of “unlucky days” – I think we all can relate to that.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Klaris, H. W. (2015). Skyggernes bog. Sorø: Tellerup.
(I used drag and drop from Mendeley)
[The Book of Shadows]. Every year I make a Christmas calendar for all the students at Absalon (10.000+) with gifts. It is an online event with quizzes about Christmas, Absalon, but indeed also about the resources that we, as a library, offer the students. Mendeley has been a part of our quiz since I started the tradition. This year we got more than 5.000 copies of this book to use as gifts. I thought I’d better read it.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I bought truffle mycelium and have now learned how to plant it along with the roots of a tree. If it works, I will know in approx. five years but then I should also be able to harvest both black and white truffles. I do not quite trust it, but it was very interesting!

What is the best part about working in research?

The best part for me, as a librarian, is when students realize that they are able to find the latest research within their field of study. It gives me hope that in the future when they work in our Health Care System they will keep doing this and provide the best care for our citizens.

And access! It is impossible to have access to all the resources that the users want. It is a matter of prioritizing which subscriptions you choose to subscribe to. Many are expensive and the funds are unfortunately not enough.

Do you have any advice for young researchers?

Stay updated. Make a search string that fits your subject area and create an alert. This will help you to stay updated.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Advisor of the month: Nick Hood

Nick HoodWhat is your name and job title?

My name is Nick Hood and I am a Senior Teaching Fellow in Secondary Education.

Where do you work?

I work at the Moray House School of Education and Sport at the University of Edinburgh.

How did you get into your field?

I took the long way round. I spent some years in the military and aerospace before starting my own software business. Part of that business involved training others in programming and data manipulation, and that led me to become a physics and mathematics teacher. I moved into teacher education about eight years ago.

Where do you do work the best?

Honestly, I think my best work is in supporting people who find our programmes challenging. Part of my job is as a personal tutor, where I get to work one-to-one with people who struggle with aspects of our very intensive postgraduate courses. Sometimes this is more pastoral, but often it is about getting to grips with academic writing.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

About eight years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Good old manual methods. I just typed what I wanted on the page.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

A friend and colleague was our local Mendeley Advisor and when she hinted that she would retire, I thought I’d step up.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

A scientist who had an idea that saved millions of lives, Robert Watson-Watt. Or, if I am allowed a fictional researcher, Hari Seldon from Asimov’s Foundation series of stories.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Barthes, R. (1980) Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, Hill and Wang.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

How to take photographs in infrared.

What is the best part about working in research?

I like learning how to manipulate and present data for understanding – sometimes that is a matter of drawing a picture.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Getting away from distractions that frustrate understanding of the thing you are trying to make sense of. We all know that moment when we can almost clearly see some complex idea, when we are so close that we can nearly touch it – and the email pings, or a knock at the door collapses it all like a house of cards.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is the smart choice for the complex task of managing your sources when writing for academic or professional purposes.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Get organised early. Establish your workflow. Use tools that get out of the way of your research activities and your data.


Find out more about Nick by following and viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

 

Advisor of the Month: Andi Anto Patak

What is your name and job title?

My name is Andi Anto Patak and I am a senior lecturer at Universitas Negeri Makassar in Indonesia.

How did you enter your field and what is your research focus?

I completed my Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in English Education at Universitas Negeri Makassar, then went on to a Ph.D. in Measurement and Evaluation at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.

The development of extensive literacy and research has interested me for many years. I have published several Mendeley-themed papers in Scopus-indexed journals as well as two books about Mendeley, which both came out in 2012. My first was also the first ever Indonesian-language book about Mendeley (*editor’s note: maybe even the first book about Mendeley!*). It had a print run of 1,000: 300 copies were sold and 700 were distributed free to students and lecturers.

My second book was also in Indonesian and also had a print run of 1,000. With this book, 500 copies were sold and the remaining 500 were distributed free. Digital versions of both books are available online and for free.

Here are links to my books:

Mendeley: Citation & PDF Reference Manager plus Jejaring Sosial by Andi Anto Patak, Erwin Akib – Books on Google Play (published in 2012).

Hindari Plagiat dengan Mendeley by Andi Anto Patak, Erwin Akib – Books on Google Play (Published in 2015)

I hope that everyone who has a passion for writing can have easy access to Mendeley. My current research is focused on developing a Mendeley-based thesis submission model that helps to avoid plagiarism.

What is your history with Mendeley?

I have used Mendeley for more than eight years. In the first year of my PhD, I used EndNote. For a short while after I discovered Mendeley, I used the two solutions together. Then I found that reference management was simpler with Mendeley — it was more user friendly for writing dissertations and papers too. So I switched full time to Mendeley.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

Because I find Mendeley easy to use, I decided to become a Mendeley Advisor. I’m able to invite fellow international students in Malaysia and my colleagues in Indonesia to jointly use Mendeley for writing dissertations, articles, research papers and other publications.

What academics, researchers or librarians would you like to work with or meet?

Professor Wendy Sutherland Smith of Deakin University, Australia, who pioneered research on plagiarism.

What is the best part of working in research?

The best part of being a researcher is finding the gaps in knowledge where we can research. Also, I like when we can find the full text of all the relevant references for a research project!

And the most challenging part?

The most challenging part is trying to work with participants who do not honestly respond to data collection.

What is one thing that you want people to know about Mendeley?

I created a Facebook group to let people know about Mendeley events in Indonesia and get feedback from Indonesian Mendeley users. You can find it here: Indonesian Mendeley Community.

Find out more about Andi by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.