Mendeley Advisor of the Month: May 2018

Mendeley advisor of the month: Dr Jordan Steel, Assistant Professor Cell Biology, Molecular Virology, Colorado State University.

Colorado State University-Pueblo faculty member Dr. Jordan Steel received the 2017 National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT) Four-Year College & University Biology Teaching Award for his highly innovative project- and team-based learning approach to his courses. A native of Albuquerque, NM, he has lived in Colorado since 2008 and enjoys spending time with his family hiking, biking, fishing, playing games, and going on adventures together to discover the amazing world we live in.

How did you get into your field and what is your research story?

I have always been interested in microbiology and have been fascinated with the molecular basis of life. From 2005-2007, I lived in the Philippines and experienced first-hand the devastation caused by mosquito-borne viral infections. Upon returning to the US, I applied and started graduate school at Colorado State University’s Arthropod-borne Infectious Disease Lab (AIDL) to study viral pathogens such as Dengue virus and West Nile Virus. My Ph.D. dissertation worked primarily with alphaviruses and modifying the viral genome to develop reporter systems within cell lines and genetically modified mosquitoes to enhance our detection of viral infection. Near the end of my Ph.D., I worked on a project on how viral infection induces oxidative stress during infection. I fell in love with this project and later moved on to a Postdoc position to study viral manipulation of host cell metabolic pathways during Dengue virus infection. I am now an assistant professor and have my own research group and we are actively working to understand how viruses modify cellular physiology in order to create an optimal environment for viral replication.

Where do you do your research/work the best? What kind of environment suits you?

Away from home! (I have 4 kids at home and I always joke around with my colleagues that I can’t get any work done at home).  Honestly, I work well in fast-paced environments with lots going on.  I enjoy the thrill and the pressure of working with lots of projects and trying to keep on top of all the demands. It can be hectic and busy, but the productivity that comes from groups with lots happening is very exciting.

How long have you been on Mendeley? 

I can’t remember the date exactly, but I can remember how it has changed my life. It was probably 2011 or 2012 and I was working to finish my Ph.D., I was unhappy with the other citation/reference managing software available and then a friend showed me Mendeley and it has changed my life! I use it almost every day since then!

What were you using prior to Mendeley and how does Mendeley influence your research?

I was using Endnote before I found Mendeley, but now I am a convert and advocate for everything Mendeley! Mendeley is the one-stop shop for all things research. It manages all of my references, allows easy annotations, helps me quickly find papers and notes from the past, and even finds and suggest articles that I should be reading! I love it!

Why did you decide to become an Advisor and how are you involved with the program?

I actually contacted Mendeley and asked to be an advisor. I teach lots of classes in our biology department and one of the first things I teach in my courses is about Mendeley. Every student and person working in biological sciences needs to know about Mendeley. I asked Mendeley if I could become an advisor and help share the good news about Mendeley and they were kind enough to accept me.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

So many great people to choose from, but I would love to meet Jonas Salk- the developer of the poliovirus vaccine. As a virologist myself, I have always been impressed and fascinated with his work and commitment to the research that he was doing! He even injected the vaccine on himself before it was fully approved. His work has saved millions of lives and it would be an honor to meet and talk virology with him.

What book are you reading at the moment and why?

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (remember that I have 4 kids at home), other than that I have been reading my Mendelian Genetics textbook because I am teaching genetics this semester and, well, it has been a long time since I took a genetics class.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

From reading my genetics textbook- Laron Syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in a short individual (due to a mutated growth hormone receptor) and also makes them resistant to certain types of cancer and diabetes.

What is the best part about working in research?

I love that each day is something different. We are always working on new problems and new questions. I also love the quality of people that I get to work with. I have decided that scientists are the best kind of people. I love my colleagues and the always changing research environment.

And the worst/most challenging part of working in research?

Funding. No explanation needed.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is the best. It is literally the answer to all of your problems and will make your life easier and better immediately. Everyone needs to know about Mendeley and use it in their research endeavors!

Finding your next job or funding opportunity has never been easier!

Mendeley’s latest machine learning innovations joins the power of AI with Mendeley Careers and Mendeley Funding. This new product development is not only set to give your career a boost, it is also set to save you huge amounts of time as it ploughs through hundreds of thousands of job and funding opportunities to find the perfect matches for you.

MendeleyCareersSuggest
Mendeley Careers Suggest

Our world of ‘information overload’ has never been more of a burden for researchers as it is today. And, just like commercial industries, academia too is under pressure to deliver more results with fewer resources. Technology is often where we turn to help us get there. Both Mendeley Careers and Mendeley Funding now harness machine learning to help researchers by suggesting job positions and funding opportunities that are most relevant to their interests and expertise.

With around 120,000 open job adverts at any given time, Mendeley Careers is the world’s largest free online search engine for job opportunities in science, technology, and engineering. This platform already saves time for hundreds of thousands of researchers who now only need to visit one website to discover the latest job opportunities in their field.

The recent implementation of machine learning recommender technology has taken this service to the next level; enter Mendeley Careers Suggest. Now, job opportunities that match your profile can land in your inbox, ready for you to digest after a busy day in the lab.

MendeleyFundingSuggest
Mendeley Funding Suggest

Similarly, researchers are under a tremendous amount of pressure to secure funding to continue their research. Again, the time and effort involved in trawling through multiple grant funding platforms is nobody’s idea of resources well spent. Mendeley Funding was launched in 2017 to support researchers in their quest by cataloguing funding opportunities from across the globe. It boasts 22,000+ active funding opportunities from over 3,000 organizations, including the European Union, government departments in the United States like the National Institutes of Health, UK Research Councils, as well as foundations and many more.

Additionally, now that this single platform gathers together such a vast quantity of funding opportunities, Mendeley Funding also includes profile information about each funder; now you can discover new funders you may not even realize were out there waiting for you.

Since adopting the same machine learning technology as Mendeley Careers Suggest, researchers can receive email notifications that inform them of the latest funding possibilities that match their research and profile. Mendeley Funding Suggest is set to make your grant application tasks so much easier!

So now, at the end of a hard day in the lab or sitting behind your laptop crunching vital data, you can rest assured knowing that Mendeley Careers and Mendeley Funding are working hard behind the scenes to help you make the next move in your career or secure that vital funding for your research. And perhaps more importantly, because these matches are sent to you as soon as they become available, you don’t need to worry about missing out on opportunities or finding time each day to check for the latest job adverts. All of this is done for you…automatically.

Other related articles:

Elsevier Connect:
http://www.elsevier.com/connect/4-tips-to-get-your-dream-job-in-research
http://www.elsevier.com/connect/how-mendeley-supports-your-research-career-including-finding-one
http://www.elsevier.com/connect/authors-update/the-writings-on-the-wall-mendeley-stats-is-moving-to-your-profile
http://www.elsevier.com/connect/how-to-find-your-dream-research-job-without-swimming-through-a-sea-of-listings

Mendeley Blog:
https://blog.mendeley.com/2018/03/13/wellcome-trust-grant-funding-applying-for-investigator-awards/
https://blog.mendeley.com/2018/01/23/insights-into-the-national-aeronautics-and-space-administration-nasa-grant-research-funding/
https://blog.mendeley.com/2017/11/27/insights-into-funding-indian-department-of-science-and-technology/
https://blog.mendeley.com/2017/10/17/an-introduction-to-applying-for-a-nih-grant/
https://blog.mendeley.com/2017/09/29/tips-for-applying-for-eu-research-funding-erc-grants/

Researchers’ Choice Communication Award 2018 – “Science is not finished until it’s communicated”

RCCA2018_151_RGBScience is the engine of prosperity and change. How do we ensure that it changes society for the best? As the UK government’s former Chief Scientific Adviser, Professor Sir Mark Walport said, “science is not finished until it’s communicated.” Without scientists communicating their findings to a wider audience, the life-changing research they do would remain a mystery to society. And early career researchers are the key to unraveling this mystery and pushing for tomorrow’s progress.

Making science more open is at the center of it all. We’re talking about encouraging collaborations, but also breaking down barriers and reaching more people. Brilliant scientists are already leading the way. Take Mat Allen, for example. Day to day he is completing a Ph.D. at Cardiff University on Galaxy research, but online he becomes UKAstroNut, explaining to tens of thousands of YouTubers why we can see the moon during the day, and developing virtual and augmented reality apps, all designed to educate and inspire children about science.

Mat is the winner of the inaugural Researchers’ Choice Communication Award. Now, we’re on the hunt for this year’s winner. We know that alongside producing amazing life-changing research, researchers do a huge amount of behind the scenes communication outreach, to help put science at the forefront of the public mind. The Researchers’ Choice Communication Award is here to provide the recognition that these researchers deserve.

LinkedWe’re looking for early career researchers who are fantastic at communicating their scientific work to the public, going above and beyond the publication of their academic advances. To be eligible for the award they must be currently living in the UK, affiliated with a UK university, and have begun publishing no earlier than 2015. We want to see evidence of their amazing communications skills, demonstrating they have gone beyond the publication of their research papers and used any kind of public activity to help people make sense of complex scientific topics, or address misleading information about scientific or medical issues.

Nominating a researcher for the RCCA – How does it work?

  • Nominations open on Wednesday 28th March 2018
  • Post the nomination directly to the dedicated Mendeley group
  • Those new to Mendeley will either need to sign up for a free account or email nominations to ecrawards@kaizo.co.uk
  • You cannot nominate yourself
  • Include the following information as part of the nomination:
    • Name
    • Age
    • Institution
    • Summary of nomination (250 words max)
    • Links to evidence of good work (e.g. research, speeches, blog posts, Twitter, YouTube, etc.) Only content clearly listed as part of the nomination will be used for final review
  •  Nominations deadline extended to Friday 29th June 2018

Voting

  • Invite peers and colleagues to ‘like’ the nomination;
  • Every ‘like’ counts as a vote;
  • Nominations with the most ‘votes’ will be shortlisted.

Three shortlisted candidates and their nominators will be invited to the Early Career Researcher UK Awards 2018 ceremony.

A panel of judges will review a shortlist of candidates, and the winner will be announced at this year’s Awards ceremony at the Royal Society in London on 4th October 2018.

If you have any questions relating to the Awards or the nomination process, feel free to post on the group and we’ll get back to you.

Coming Soon: Careers’ Suggest

The internet’s first great achievement was putting in place ubiquitous connections: people to people, people to information, and information to companies and institutions.  Having spanned the globe and linked billions of people together, now comes an altogether more crucial phase: making the information gleaned from this vast, ever-expanding network relevant, personal and effective.

Mendeley Careers is at the forefront of this trend.  Soon it will feature its first recommender function that makes looking for the next job suggestions more convenient than ever.  Its unique algorithms will leverage the Elsevier ecosystem to provide tailored recommendations.  It will no longer be necessary to knock on opportunity’s door, opportunities will arrive in your inbox, matched to your profile and interests.

The millions of Mendeley users who have signed up for notifications will automatically receive these jobs; those who haven’t need only click on the downward pointing arrow next to their name on the top right hand corner of the screen, select Settings and Privacy, then click Notifications on the menu on the left.

Heather Williams, Product Manager for Mendeley Careers stated, “Mendeley Careers is already the world’s largest job search engine in the science, technology and engineering fields; Careers’ Suggest is the next step forward to connect the brightest minds to positions that let them pursue their passions.”

 

 

Want to work for a top science employer?

There are many brilliant workplaces in the world of scientific research.

It’s awards season again, and Science Magazine has pulled together its list of top 20 employers.

Mendeley Careers has opportunities from these leading firms. To find their latest roles, click the links below:

Ranking Employer Name Link to Jobs
1 Regeneron Link
4 Merck (Germany) Link
5 Novo Nordisk Link
7 Genentech Link
8 Eli Lilly Link
10 Abbvie Link
11 AstraZeneca Link
12 Syngenta Link
13 Roche Link
14 Novartis Link
15 Abbott Link
16 Boehringer Link
17 Merck Link
18 Monsanto Link
19 Celgene Link

Want more jobs?

On Mendeley Careers: Brexit & Science – Brexit Means What?

As the United Kingdom departs the European Union, what is the future of British science and research?
As the United Kingdom departs the European Union, what is the future of British science and research?

On Mendeley Careers, we’ve just published an interview with Dr. Anne Forde of Cambridge University; we’re trying to get to the bottom of the complex issue of Brexit and Science in the United Kingdom:

“Brexit means Brexit” according to Prime Minister Theresa May; however, this statement masks a series of complex questions. For example, what will be the future relationship between the United Kingdom and European Union? Will Britain participate in European funding programmes such as Horizon 2020? Will researchers from the European Union still flock to Britain’s globally renowned universities to do their work? How are the universities adjusting to these seismic changes?

Click here to read the full interview.