Enjoy an easy and fast route to published journal articles

Get Full Text Research (GetFTR) is an exciting new collaboration that provides researchers with more seamless access to journal articles directly through online research platforms, without any need to use multiple login methods.

The initial pilot has just launched on Mendeley as well as other scholarly platforms, and at present highlights entitlement rights and provides fast links from five major publishers: the American Chemical Society, Elsevier, Springer Nature, Taylor & Francis Group and Wiley. More publishers are expected to join this initial group soon. You might already be able to try GetFTR on Mendeley if your institution has signed up to the relevant access services.

Here’s how it works: Imagine you’re searching for a journal article on Mendeley, GetFTR will add a “View PDF” link beside every article that’s included in your institution’s journal subscriptions. If you’ve recently authenticated at your institution, simply click the link and it will take you straight to the full-text article. If you haven’t authenticated recently, you’ll be directed to your institution’s login page to check your credentials. Providing quick and easy access to knowledge, even when you’re off campus, is now even more important than ever.

GetFTR in action

This pilot will be used to gather feedback on the new service – assessing its accuracy, effectiveness and technical robustness – in order to better meet the needs of researchers. Simultaneously, more research solutions are working on integrating GetFTR.

Elsevier is excited to be part of Get Full Text Research as a publisher and provider of research solutions. We hope Mendeley users who are part of the pilot will enjoy the direct route to articles, and look forward to hearing from you. Please do get in touch with any questions or feedback at support@getfulltextresearch.com.

Mendeley’s participation in this initiative is part of a wider aim to support researchers to easily discover and seamlessly access relevant research. Researchers can visit Mendeley to search over 100million cross-publisher articles, get 1-click access to over 70million PDFs where available and benefit from readership insights and relevant further reading recommendations. Find out more here.

Advisor of the Month: Yahaya Gavamukulya

Editor’s note:  We’d like to congratulate Dr. Gavamukulya on finishing his PhD and inspiring a new group of Mendeley Advisors!

What is your name and job title?

I am Dr Gavamukulya Yahaya (PhD), a Lecturer in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Busitema University, Mbale – Uganda. I am also a dynamic Global Mendeley Advisor.

How did you get into your field?

Quite a very long story, but to sum it all up, passion led me where I am and has helped me stay here.

Where do you work the best?

In an environment with people who not only take me as a colleague, but get to learn and understand each and every one as an individual yet moving together as a team. Reciprocally, I really enjoy knowing everyone in my work environment as a person rather than just knowing them as colleagues, students, peers among others.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I have been using Mendeley for 6 years, 4 of which have been as an Advisor.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

It’s quite embarrassing, but I was adding references manually without any reference manager.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

With resources on the website, I taught myself how to use Mendeley and it took me some time before perfecting it. Once I perfected and became experienced in all the features, and with the gaps analysis in the communities I was living in, I decided to enroll as an Advisor in order to help train and enroll as many people as possible in order for them not to go through what I used to go through prior to discovering Mendeley. Additionally, research being at the core of our training, having a resource person with interest and expertise in guiding learners through Mendeley becomes an added advantage to the Institutions. I have so far recruited, enrolled and trained more than 1,700 Mendeley users globally.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Prof Kary Banks Mullis (December 28, 1944 – August 7, 2019), just to thank him for the revolutionary technology of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).

What is the best part about working in research?

Navigating uncharted waters and eventually creating a trail…

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Uncertainty…

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is here to accompany them through the entire research journey.

Do you have an advice for young researchers? 

Passion, Passion, Passion, Patience, Perseverance and the correct team… It shall keep you there even when the going gets tough.

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Find out more about Dr. Gavamukulya by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Meet the Team: Susan Tyler Jenkins

Name: Susan Tyler Jenkins

Job title: Researcher Community Advisor, Mendeley Community Management Team

Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

I have a research background in art history and communication, and I worked in various roles for both community and corporate organizations in the US and Europe. My current interest is in the crossover fields of eco-psychology and contemplative practices, and the impact of green spaces on human health and urban societies. I’m also a meditation teacher with training in Buddhist study and practice. I spend my free time making wilderness walks and art.

When did you join Mendeley?

March of this year! I’m still getting acquainted.

What do you love most about your job?

I love being part of a delightful team that is supporting the development and furthering of knowledge in the world.

What book did you most recently read?

I often have two or three things going at once, in totally different genres. “Underground: A Human History of the Worlds Beneath Our Feet” by Will Hunt is a recent book on how connected we are through our explorations of caves, subways, and other places within the earth, told through a series of ever richer expeditions by the author, beginning when he was a teenager and discovered a hidden tunnel near his house. I also recently finished an audio version of the Chinese classic “The Romance of the Three Kingdoms,” which gives a lot of insight into the historical period at the end of the Han Dynasty (~180 – 260 CE) that gave China several of its most revered heroes.

What’s one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

That it’s not only a great way to find ideas for your research but also a way to build a network with people who have like-minded interests.

How would you explain your job to a stranger on a bus?

I support researchers from institutions all over the world in connecting with each other and in understanding the many ways that they can use the research tools and networks Mendeley has built.

What’s the most exciting part of your job?

I find meeting new people from all corners of the world to be the top perk, followed by seeing where new paths are (e)merging in research fields.

What keeps you awake at night?

Listening to too many podcasts!

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

The difference between a moor and a fen, both British English terms for types of peaty landscapes found in the British Isles. The British have so many words for describing different landscapes that we don’t have in American English, despite America having such a diversity of landscapes itself. Both the landscape and the language are fascinating to know.

Advisor of the month: Giscard Wilfried Koyaweda

Editor’s note: Giscard hosted our first Advisor event in the Central African Republic!

What is your name and job title?

My Name is Giscard Wilfried Koyaweda.

Job Title – Research Assistant.

Where do you work?

I work as a Research Assistant at the National Laboratory of Clinical Biology and Public Health of Bangui, Central African Republic, in the Molecular Biology Department.

How did you get into your field?

Since childhood, I have always been fascinated by biological sciences and always chose that particular line. When I got to the University in 2012, I studied the Life and Earth sciences in my 1st year, Life Science during the 2nd year and Biochemistry in the 3rd. Immediately after my Bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry, I got an Internship at Institut Pasteur de Bangui in the Viral Hepatitis Laboratory. This has enabled me to develop more interest in research specifically health sciences.

In 2017, I was awarded the Pan African University scholarship to study a Master’s of science in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology. During my Master’s, I worked on molecular virology of the hepatitis B virus in the Central African Republic. After successfully finishing my Master’s degree, I joined the Scientific Team of National Laboratory of Central African Republic.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I started using Mendeley in 2018.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Before, I used to make my references manually.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I have realized that Mendeley (an automated reference manager) is very helpful for research report writing and many students are not aware of this resourceful software. I attended an Advisor training session organized by the Advisor Dr. Yahaya Gavamukulya in 2018, which made me skilled in the software. As a person, I am very passionate about sharing knowledge with others in need. With that background, I have decided to become a Mendeley Advisor so that I can organize official training sessions about the usage of Mendeley to researchers and students who don’t have any knowledge in any reference manager in the Central African Republic and elsewhere.

(Editor’s note: Giscard is the first person to organize a Mendeley event in the Central African Republic! A big congratulations from Team Mendeley.)

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

I would like to work with Professor Anna Kramvis, a  Research Professor and Director of the Hepatitis Virus Diversity Research Unit (HVDRU), University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. I really appreciate her scientific skills and work on the hepatitis B virus. Her primary research interest is the molecular virology of the hepatitis B virus (HBV), especially of uniquely African strains of the virus, which differ from those found in other regions of the world.

What is the best part about working in research?

In research, I enjoy the part of data analysis.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

From my experience conducting research in the area of biology, sample collection is the most challenging part.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

I believe that Mendeley is more than a simple reference manager because it offers the Mendeley Careers and Funding Opportunities.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

My advice for young researchers is that doing excellent research is not enough to grow scientifically. The results need to be shared with other scientists and in the research community. That will make you grow scientifically.

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Find out more about Giscard by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

 

The 2020 vision of you

How to stand out with a Mendeley profile

Making sure that potential collaborators, funders, employers and institutional leaders can find and see the real you is key to a successful research career.

With a Mendeley profile you can easily present a highly visible and accurate picture of who you are as a researcher. This includes showcasing your research objectives, the impact of your work, and other accomplishments alongside your publications and additional citation metrics. Telling the complete story of you and your research in one place is a great way to stand out.

Sign up for a Mendeley profile

Here are four easy ways you can use your Mendeley profile to showcase your achievements and impact:

1. Go beyond the metrics.Profile image (5)
Stand out to funders, peers, employers and institutional leaders by adding a clear personal mission statement, the outcome or societal impact of a recent project in your “About” description. Top tip: making this description at least 200 words increases the findability of your profile in searches.

2. Your best interests at heart.
Make it easy for potential collaborators with similar interests to find you by regularly updating the clickable, searchable “Research interests” keywords.

3. Put a face to a name.
Help others relate to the real person behind the facts. Adding a profile picture improves the impact of your profile.

Profile image (6)4. Better connected.
Keep your publications and all associated metrics up to date, and make your profile a one-stop place where others can see all the information about the societal, academic and collegial impact of your work. Simply connect your Mendeley profile to your Scopus Author Profile to autofill your “Publications” and “Impact” sections.

It’s now also easier for visitors to your profile to quickly access your research via the new “View PDF” button, which appears alongside each available publication in your profile and links straight through to the full article.

These are just some of the ways Mendeley profiles have recently been improved to help you stand out in an increasingly competitive world. Even if you’ve had a Mendeley profile for years, check out the new look – you’re bound to see something you want to use to present the right 2020 vision of you.

View your Mendeley profile

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Mendeley profiles are just one of the ways in which Mendeley supports you in your research career. Find out what more it can help you do – from managing references, to staying up to date with the latest research, to finding funding opportunities – by visiting mendeley.com

Advisor of the Month: Emiliano Jozami

What is your name and job title?

Emiliano Jozami.
Teaching assistant and Auxiliary Researcher at the Research Council of the National University of Rosario (CIUNR) in Argentina.

Where do you work?

Parque Villarino, Zavalla
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences of the National University of Rosario, Argentina
https://fcagr.unr.edu.ar/

How did you get into your field?

As a student, I started working in research and collaboration in biology. This is a subject for first year students of Agriculture Engineering and the Bachelor of Natural Resources.

What are you currently working on?

I am researching two different lines:

  • Second generation biofuels and their sustainability using life cycle assessment methodology.
  • Climatology, teleconnections such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation, and its effects in crops yields.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I started using Mendeley in 2014. I was looking for a reference manager that could reduce the stressful work of organizing my bibliography. Mendeley had everything I required from a reference manager (i- easy and versatile ways of adding citations; ii- well-ordered bibliography; iii- it allows you to create your own tags along your library; iv- it allows you to find text within your files).

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

To aid my colleagues in being more efficient in the time dedicated to the management of their library and its use in a manuscript/thesis or any type of writing that requires references.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Dead: Charles Darwin.

Alive: C. Donald Ahrens. I love his books “Meteorology today”.

What book are you reading at the moment?

“Geopolítica y alimentos” by Juan José Borrell, a colleague from the CIUNR.

 What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

This week was particularly happy for me as I have obtained a scholarship at National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET) to finish my PhD.

I have learned how to repair a leak at my bath with a brand-new sealer I have never used before.  (Editor’s note: Sounds like amazing work from Emiliano. Leaky bathtubs are terrible!)

What is the best part about working in research?

I love doing research. Since I was an undergraduate student, I have been passionate about it as well as explaining subjects to my fellow students at university. Both activities make me feel good with myself. It is really gratifying when I receive positive feedback from a student or when passing a selection processes; i.e:  obtaining a scholarship, an award, publishing an article in a prestigious journal or obtaining funding for research in high competition calls.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Unfortunately, in Argentina, salaries are very low and the procedures to grow in this profession are not what one would expect.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

It really can make your work easier!! It is worth learning to use Mendeley and is really a user friendly software. It is also a great social network of researchers all over the world.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Although the scenario can be adverse sometimes and things do not go always as you wish, keep trying it. Perseverance is essential to achieve your objectives.

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Find out more about Emiliano by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Importing references just got even easier: introducing the new Mendeley Web Importer

Mendeley Web Importer Chrome DesktopFor the past decade, Mendeley Web Importer has been vital for busy researchers, making it easy to add articles from across the internet to their reference library.

Today, we’re pleased to announce an all-new version, with new features and a refreshed design. The new Mendeley Web Importer is available for both Google Chrome and Firefox.

What’s new?

Rebuilt for reliability and flexibility

Mendeley Web Importer has been completely rebuilt to ensure rock-solid reliability in finding relevant references and uploading them to your Mendeley library.

The new version also lets you get on with other work while uploads are in progress. It can keep uploading PDFs to your Mendeley library even if you close the window or switch tabs.

Preview the full text before adding it to your library

Everyone’s workflow is different. If you prefer to scan the full text before deciding to add it to your Mendeley library, now you can simply select ‘View PDF’ in the Mendeley Web Importer interface. The PDF will open within Elsevier’s enhanced PDF reader, adding navigational shortcuts and clickable elements to the full texts. More enhancements are planned too, so keep an eye out for future announcements.

Mendeley Web Importer preview PDF

 

Organize your PDFs into collections and share them with groups

The redesigned interface makes it clearer and easier to add references directly to the collections and groups in your Mendeley library. Mendeley Web Importer now also remembers the last collection you selected, saving you time.

Get more full texts than ever before

We’ve introduced new technology to enable the retrieval of even more full-text PDFs. That means that when you use Mendeley Web Importer, you can have total confidence that you’re getting everything you need.

If your account is authenticated to a registered institutional network, Mendeley Web Importer also retrieves full texts from publisher sites, including ScienceDirect, Wiley Online, Taylor and Francis Online, and SpringerLink.

Huge accessibility improvements

It’s important that everyone can navigate Mendeley Web Importer in the way that’s best for them. If the keyboard is the right tool for you, you can now simply select either Ctrl-Shift-S on your PC or Cmd-Shift-S on your Mac to import references and full texts using only the keyboard.

No more waiting for version updates

Websites change all the time. To ensure constant compatibility, we have a responsive development strategy for Mendeley Web Importer.

To ensure your version doesn’t fall behind, meaning a sub-optimal experience for you, we now automatically cascade updates to your browser as soon as they are available.

Get started with Mendeley Web Importer

To get started, simply visit www.mendeley.com/reference-management/web-importer.

For Google Chrome, if you already have the earlier version of Mendeley Web Importer installed, the new version will overwrite the existing version automatically.

For Firefox, you will need to uninstall the previous version and install the new one.

We expect to release ports to Microsoft Edge and Safari later in 2020.

What’s next?

The new Mendeley Web Importer is designed to save you time and simplify your research workflow.

We always welcome your feedback on how to improve our solutions and services, so do let us know your thoughts on the new Mendeley Web Importer using our feedback form or using the ‘Send feedback’ link in the new Web Importer settings page.

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Mendeley Web Importer is just one of Mendeley’s reference management tools available to help you build your knowledge. Find out more about reference management from Mendeley here.

Looking for advice on effectively building your knowledgebase? Take a look at this Elsevier Connect article on key steps to collecting and organizing research.