Advisor of the Month: Juliana Soares Lima

What is your name and job title?

My name is Juliana Soares Lima. I am a Reference Librarian at the Human Sciences Library of the Federal University of Ceará, located in the Northeast region of Brazil. I have graduated in Librarianship and completed my master’s degree in Information Science at the same institution that I work.

How did you get into your field?

I’ve always enjoyed reading and I love researching many things. I was also very happy to help other people get the information they needed, especially to exercise their rights and citizenship, so it’s not hard to deduce that this ‘curiosity’ would lead me to Librarianship and Information Science. From the day I discovered that I could work with books, information and knowledge to help and support in academic/scientific research, and somehow make a difference in people’s lives, then I decided that I wanted to be a librarian.

Where do you do work the best?

I feel fortunate to work in the Humanities area, as it is a field that is usually related to other areas of knowledge. So, I work better in an environment that allows me to live with the diversity of knowledge and people, that is, an environment in which open access to scientific knowledge is discussed; or about technology but without leaving aside what makes us human; and discuss politics and progress without forgetting the poverty and social problems that afflict Brazil and other countries.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I’ve been using Mendeley for 6 years. Since 2017 I have been a Mendeley Advisor.

Which solutions were you using prior to Mendeley?

I used to make references manually. Then I discovered some reference builders online and started using them, but I missed something that would allow me to go beyond building references, I wanted to manage them using some software. As a librarian, I usually use and research these tools and after a long search I found the reference managers Endnote, Mendeley, Zotero and others. I usually offer training in all three (Endnote, Mendeley, Zotero), but Mendeley is quite successful during training sessions because of the variety of functions and resources, as well as storage space has been an essential factor when comparing three software.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

First, the nature of my work in the reference service, I usually teach, organize courses and other training courses that help the institution’s researchers to be successful in their research in databases and in the use of resources offered by the library, as well as the reference managers.

From the huge acceptance and the increase in the use of Mendeley in the institution, I decided to become Mendeley Advisor to always be aware of the news about the software and to be able to better assist the public served in the library. So that this objective could be reached, at the time, I led a series of actions to expand Mendeley’s reach at the Federal University of Ceará. I invited two more librarian colleagues (Edvander Pires and Izabel Lima) from the institution to help promote Mendeley in each Campus and increase the number of training and users. Together, we held face-to-face training sessions on Mendeley and then we developed tutorials that were posted on the library’s institutional website. During all the courses I also created a badge for students who want to help promote Mendeley to use it in their photos on Facebook or Twitter profiles. After that, we decided to create video classes and I did some tests before using Google Classroom to teach people how to use Mendeley. Each of us recorded the lessons and I edited them. All video lessons are available on YouTube.

Currently, during the month of May and June 2020,  I am teaching Mendeley for two classes in the Google Classroom, each class there are 250 students.

Video lessons: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSaJUgnz0jg&list=PLOhWAljyF7ro5h0nMSA38Jj9en04JO3X6

Twibbon #ILoveMendeley: https://twibbon.com/support/ilovemendeley

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Dead: 1) Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan, (born August 9, 1892, Madras, India — died September 27, 1972, Bangalore), Indian librarian and educator who was considered the father of Library Science in India and whose contributions had worldwide influence; 2) Aaron Swartz, he was an American computer programmer, entrepreneur, writer, political organizer, and Internet hacktivist. He was involved in the development of the web feed format RSS, the Markdown publishing format and the Creative Commons Licenses.

Alive: I am lucky to know and have worked with my advisor in the master’s degree, Professor Giovanna Guedes, but there are still so many good people that I wanted to meet in person! Antonio Agenor Briquet de Lemos (Retired professor at the University of Brasília); Professor Murilo Bastos, Michael Buckland, Tim Berners-Lee, Alice Meadows (NISO’s Director of Community Engagement), Christine Borgman (Distinguished Research Professor Information Studies University of California, Los Angeles), Luciano Floridi (Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford), Peter Suber, Lawrence Lessig.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Habibi, authored by Craig Thompson. It is a graphic novel set in a fictional landscape of Islamic fairy tales that describes the relationship between two slave children on the run.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

In Brazil, we are going through a difficult period in which we have to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic and with government conflicts. It has been difficult; I can say that every week I learn something new even working from home. I have more and more faith and certainty that the sharing of information, scientific knowledge and the intense work of researchers can bring a global solution in the fight against COVID-19. Meanwhile, during this week, I am learning to balance household chores and work activities better than the previous month. Also, this week I’m learning to be resilient.

What is the best part about working in research?

There are many wonderful things in the development of research. I believe that there is no single best part, as it is a set of steps that complement each other: a) from the conception of the idea of a study; b) the search for scientific literature that supports the study; c) experiences from field research; d) the surprises that occur during the research; e) the discovery and exploitation of results, etc.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

There is no easy search! This is the good and the bad part at the same time.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

I want users to know how they can take advantage of Mendeley and explore all the available functions: managing references, building a profile on Mendeley online, depositing research data in Mendeley Data, using Mendeley to make systematic reviews and more.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

My advice is to keep studying and updating, especially nowadays when everything changes very quickly and we need to be prepared to obtain new knowledge and skills that we didn’t have before. Always adapt, renew and reinvent yourself. Don’t settle. Life is movement and we need to keep up with trends, however, without ever forgetting to value the classic and universal knowledge that remains current even after so many years. Be curious. Research and try to be critical: not everything written in a book, article or other material represents an absolute truth because in all knowledge there is a limit, a strength and a weakness.

 

Find out more about Juliana by viewing her Mendeley profile.

 Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

The June 2020 Advisor Briefing: New reference manager updates, more teaching materials and how we support the SDGs

While the physical Mendeley office has been quiet, our teams haven’t been! We’ve spent the last few months working hard on continuing to develop the new Mendeley Reference Manager and looking at ways to help you better promote Mendeley.

June’s Advisor Briefing topics include:

  • Mendeley Reference Manager updates
  • New Mendeley resources for librarians and other educators
  • Matching published research to Sustainable Development Goals

You can watch the recording here

Questions?  Reach out at community@mendeley.com

 

Enjoy an easy and fast route to published journal articles

Get Full Text Research (GetFTR) is an exciting new collaboration that provides researchers with more seamless access to journal articles directly through online research platforms, without any need to use multiple login methods.

The initial pilot has just launched on Mendeley as well as other scholarly platforms, and at present highlights entitlement rights and provides fast links from five major publishers: the American Chemical Society, Elsevier, Springer Nature, Taylor & Francis Group and Wiley. More publishers are expected to join this initial group soon. You might already be able to try GetFTR on Mendeley if your institution has signed up to the relevant access services.

Here’s how it works: Imagine you’re searching for a journal article on Mendeley, GetFTR will add a “View PDF” link beside every article that’s included in your institution’s journal subscriptions. If you’ve recently authenticated at your institution, simply click the link and it will take you straight to the full-text article. If you haven’t authenticated recently, you’ll be directed to your institution’s login page to check your credentials. Providing quick and easy access to knowledge, even when you’re off campus, is now even more important than ever.

GetFTR in action

This pilot will be used to gather feedback on the new service – assessing its accuracy, effectiveness and technical robustness – in order to better meet the needs of researchers. Simultaneously, more research solutions are working on integrating GetFTR.

Elsevier is excited to be part of Get Full Text Research as a publisher and provider of research solutions. We hope Mendeley users who are part of the pilot will enjoy the direct route to articles, and look forward to hearing from you. Please do get in touch with any questions or feedback at support@getfulltextresearch.com.

Mendeley’s participation in this initiative is part of a wider aim to support researchers to easily discover and seamlessly access relevant research. Researchers can visit Mendeley to search over 100million cross-publisher articles, get 1-click access to over 70million PDFs where available and benefit from readership insights and relevant further reading recommendations. Find out more here.

Advisor of the Month: Yahaya Gavamukulya

Editor’s note:  We’d like to congratulate Dr. Gavamukulya on finishing his PhD and inspiring a new group of Mendeley Advisors!

What is your name and job title?

I am Dr Gavamukulya Yahaya (PhD), a Lecturer in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Busitema University, Mbale – Uganda. I am also a dynamic Global Mendeley Advisor.

How did you get into your field?

Quite a very long story, but to sum it all up, passion led me where I am and has helped me stay here.

Where do you work the best?

In an environment with people who not only take me as a colleague, but get to learn and understand each and every one as an individual yet moving together as a team. Reciprocally, I really enjoy knowing everyone in my work environment as a person rather than just knowing them as colleagues, students, peers among others.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I have been using Mendeley for 6 years, 4 of which have been as an Advisor.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

It’s quite embarrassing, but I was adding references manually without any reference manager.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

With resources on the website, I taught myself how to use Mendeley and it took me some time before perfecting it. Once I perfected and became experienced in all the features, and with the gaps analysis in the communities I was living in, I decided to enroll as an Advisor in order to help train and enroll as many people as possible in order for them not to go through what I used to go through prior to discovering Mendeley. Additionally, research being at the core of our training, having a resource person with interest and expertise in guiding learners through Mendeley becomes an added advantage to the Institutions. I have so far recruited, enrolled and trained more than 1,700 Mendeley users globally.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Prof Kary Banks Mullis (December 28, 1944 – August 7, 2019), just to thank him for the revolutionary technology of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).

What is the best part about working in research?

Navigating uncharted waters and eventually creating a trail…

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Uncertainty…

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is here to accompany them through the entire research journey.

Do you have an advice for young researchers? 

Passion, Passion, Passion, Patience, Perseverance and the correct team… It shall keep you there even when the going gets tough.

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Find out more about Dr. Gavamukulya by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Meet the Team: Susan Tyler Jenkins

Name: Susan Tyler Jenkins

Job title: Researcher Community Advisor, Mendeley Community Management Team

Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

I have a research background in art history and communication, and I worked in various roles for both community and corporate organizations in the US and Europe. My current interest is in the crossover fields of eco-psychology and contemplative practices, and the impact of green spaces on human health and urban societies. I’m also a meditation teacher with training in Buddhist study and practice. I spend my free time making wilderness walks and art.

When did you join Mendeley?

March of this year! I’m still getting acquainted.

What do you love most about your job?

I love being part of a delightful team that is supporting the development and furthering of knowledge in the world.

What book did you most recently read?

I often have two or three things going at once, in totally different genres. “Underground: A Human History of the Worlds Beneath Our Feet” by Will Hunt is a recent book on how connected we are through our explorations of caves, subways, and other places within the earth, told through a series of ever richer expeditions by the author, beginning when he was a teenager and discovered a hidden tunnel near his house. I also recently finished an audio version of the Chinese classic “The Romance of the Three Kingdoms,” which gives a lot of insight into the historical period at the end of the Han Dynasty (~180 – 260 CE) that gave China several of its most revered heroes.

What’s one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

That it’s not only a great way to find ideas for your research but also a way to build a network with people who have like-minded interests.

How would you explain your job to a stranger on a bus?

I support researchers from institutions all over the world in connecting with each other and in understanding the many ways that they can use the research tools and networks Mendeley has built.

What’s the most exciting part of your job?

I find meeting new people from all corners of the world to be the top perk, followed by seeing where new paths are (e)merging in research fields.

What keeps you awake at night?

Listening to too many podcasts!

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

The difference between a moor and a fen, both British English terms for types of peaty landscapes found in the British Isles. The British have so many words for describing different landscapes that we don’t have in American English, despite America having such a diversity of landscapes itself. Both the landscape and the language are fascinating to know.

Advisor of the month: Giscard Wilfried Koyaweda

Editor’s note: Giscard hosted our first Advisor event in the Central African Republic!

What is your name and job title?

My Name is Giscard Wilfried Koyaweda.

Job Title – Research Assistant.

Where do you work?

I work as a Research Assistant at the National Laboratory of Clinical Biology and Public Health of Bangui, Central African Republic, in the Molecular Biology Department.

How did you get into your field?

Since childhood, I have always been fascinated by biological sciences and always chose that particular line. When I got to the University in 2012, I studied the Life and Earth sciences in my 1st year, Life Science during the 2nd year and Biochemistry in the 3rd. Immediately after my Bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry, I got an Internship at Institut Pasteur de Bangui in the Viral Hepatitis Laboratory. This has enabled me to develop more interest in research specifically health sciences.

In 2017, I was awarded the Pan African University scholarship to study a Master’s of science in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology. During my Master’s, I worked on molecular virology of the hepatitis B virus in the Central African Republic. After successfully finishing my Master’s degree, I joined the Scientific Team of National Laboratory of Central African Republic.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I started using Mendeley in 2018.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Before, I used to make my references manually.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I have realized that Mendeley (an automated reference manager) is very helpful for research report writing and many students are not aware of this resourceful software. I attended an Advisor training session organized by the Advisor Dr. Yahaya Gavamukulya in 2018, which made me skilled in the software. As a person, I am very passionate about sharing knowledge with others in need. With that background, I have decided to become a Mendeley Advisor so that I can organize official training sessions about the usage of Mendeley to researchers and students who don’t have any knowledge in any reference manager in the Central African Republic and elsewhere.

(Editor’s note: Giscard is the first person to organize a Mendeley event in the Central African Republic! A big congratulations from Team Mendeley.)

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

I would like to work with Professor Anna Kramvis, a  Research Professor and Director of the Hepatitis Virus Diversity Research Unit (HVDRU), University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. I really appreciate her scientific skills and work on the hepatitis B virus. Her primary research interest is the molecular virology of the hepatitis B virus (HBV), especially of uniquely African strains of the virus, which differ from those found in other regions of the world.

What is the best part about working in research?

In research, I enjoy the part of data analysis.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

From my experience conducting research in the area of biology, sample collection is the most challenging part.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

I believe that Mendeley is more than a simple reference manager because it offers the Mendeley Careers and Funding Opportunities.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

My advice for young researchers is that doing excellent research is not enough to grow scientifically. The results need to be shared with other scientists and in the research community. That will make you grow scientifically.

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Find out more about Giscard by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

 

The 2020 vision of you

How to stand out with a Mendeley profile

Making sure that potential collaborators, funders, employers and institutional leaders can find and see the real you is key to a successful research career.

With a Mendeley profile you can easily present a highly visible and accurate picture of who you are as a researcher. This includes showcasing your research objectives, the impact of your work, and other accomplishments alongside your publications and additional citation metrics. Telling the complete story of you and your research in one place is a great way to stand out.

Sign up for a Mendeley profile

Here are four easy ways you can use your Mendeley profile to showcase your achievements and impact:

1. Go beyond the metrics.Profile image (5)
Stand out to funders, peers, employers and institutional leaders by adding a clear personal mission statement, the outcome or societal impact of a recent project in your “About” description. Top tip: making this description at least 200 words increases the findability of your profile in searches.

2. Your best interests at heart.
Make it easy for potential collaborators with similar interests to find you by regularly updating the clickable, searchable “Research interests” keywords.

3. Put a face to a name.
Help others relate to the real person behind the facts. Adding a profile picture improves the impact of your profile.

Profile image (6)4. Better connected.
Keep your publications and all associated metrics up to date, and make your profile a one-stop place where others can see all the information about the societal, academic and collegial impact of your work. Simply connect your Mendeley profile to your Scopus Author Profile to autofill your “Publications” and “Impact” sections.

It’s now also easier for visitors to your profile to quickly access your research via the new “View PDF” button, which appears alongside each available publication in your profile and links straight through to the full article.

These are just some of the ways Mendeley profiles have recently been improved to help you stand out in an increasingly competitive world. Even if you’ve had a Mendeley profile for years, check out the new look – you’re bound to see something you want to use to present the right 2020 vision of you.

View your Mendeley profile

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Mendeley profiles are just one of the ways in which Mendeley supports you in your research career. Find out what more it can help you do – from managing references, to staying up to date with the latest research, to finding funding opportunities – by visiting mendeley.com

Advisor of the Month: Emiliano Jozami

What is your name and job title?

Emiliano Jozami.
Teaching assistant and Auxiliary Researcher at the Research Council of the National University of Rosario (CIUNR) in Argentina.

Where do you work?

Parque Villarino, Zavalla
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences of the National University of Rosario, Argentina
https://fcagr.unr.edu.ar/

How did you get into your field?

As a student, I started working in research and collaboration in biology. This is a subject for first year students of Agriculture Engineering and the Bachelor of Natural Resources.

What are you currently working on?

I am researching two different lines:

  • Second generation biofuels and their sustainability using life cycle assessment methodology.
  • Climatology, teleconnections such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation, and its effects in crops yields.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I started using Mendeley in 2014. I was looking for a reference manager that could reduce the stressful work of organizing my bibliography. Mendeley had everything I required from a reference manager (i- easy and versatile ways of adding citations; ii- well-ordered bibliography; iii- it allows you to create your own tags along your library; iv- it allows you to find text within your files).

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

To aid my colleagues in being more efficient in the time dedicated to the management of their library and its use in a manuscript/thesis or any type of writing that requires references.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Dead: Charles Darwin.

Alive: C. Donald Ahrens. I love his books “Meteorology today”.

What book are you reading at the moment?

“Geopolítica y alimentos” by Juan José Borrell, a colleague from the CIUNR.

 What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

This week was particularly happy for me as I have obtained a scholarship at National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET) to finish my PhD.

I have learned how to repair a leak at my bath with a brand-new sealer I have never used before.  (Editor’s note: Sounds like amazing work from Emiliano. Leaky bathtubs are terrible!)

What is the best part about working in research?

I love doing research. Since I was an undergraduate student, I have been passionate about it as well as explaining subjects to my fellow students at university. Both activities make me feel good with myself. It is really gratifying when I receive positive feedback from a student or when passing a selection processes; i.e:  obtaining a scholarship, an award, publishing an article in a prestigious journal or obtaining funding for research in high competition calls.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Unfortunately, in Argentina, salaries are very low and the procedures to grow in this profession are not what one would expect.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

It really can make your work easier!! It is worth learning to use Mendeley and is really a user friendly software. It is also a great social network of researchers all over the world.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Although the scenario can be adverse sometimes and things do not go always as you wish, keep trying it. Perseverance is essential to achieve your objectives.

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Find out more about Emiliano by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Importing references just got even easier: introducing the new Mendeley Web Importer

Mendeley Web Importer Chrome DesktopFor the past decade, Mendeley Web Importer has been vital for busy researchers, making it easy to add articles from across the internet to their reference library.

Today, we’re pleased to announce an all-new version, with new features and a refreshed design. The new Mendeley Web Importer is available for both Google Chrome and Firefox.

What’s new?

Rebuilt for reliability and flexibility

Mendeley Web Importer has been completely rebuilt to ensure rock-solid reliability in finding relevant references and uploading them to your Mendeley library.

The new version also lets you get on with other work while uploads are in progress. It can keep uploading PDFs to your Mendeley library even if you close the window or switch tabs.

Preview the full text before adding it to your library

Everyone’s workflow is different. If you prefer to scan the full text before deciding to add it to your Mendeley library, now you can simply select ‘View PDF’ in the Mendeley Web Importer interface. The PDF will open within Elsevier’s enhanced PDF reader, adding navigational shortcuts and clickable elements to the full texts. More enhancements are planned too, so keep an eye out for future announcements.

Mendeley Web Importer preview PDF

 

Organize your PDFs into collections and share them with groups

The redesigned interface makes it clearer and easier to add references directly to the collections and groups in your Mendeley library. Mendeley Web Importer now also remembers the last collection you selected, saving you time.

Get more full texts than ever before

We’ve introduced new technology to enable the retrieval of even more full-text PDFs. That means that when you use Mendeley Web Importer, you can have total confidence that you’re getting everything you need.

If your account is authenticated to a registered institutional network, Mendeley Web Importer also retrieves full texts from publisher sites, including ScienceDirect, Wiley Online, Taylor and Francis Online, and SpringerLink.

Huge accessibility improvements

It’s important that everyone can navigate Mendeley Web Importer in the way that’s best for them. If the keyboard is the right tool for you, you can now simply select either Ctrl-Shift-S on your PC or Cmd-Shift-S on your Mac to import references and full texts using only the keyboard.

No more waiting for version updates

Websites change all the time. To ensure constant compatibility, we have a responsive development strategy for Mendeley Web Importer.

To ensure your version doesn’t fall behind, meaning a sub-optimal experience for you, we now automatically cascade updates to your browser as soon as they are available.

Get started with Mendeley Web Importer

To get started, simply visit www.mendeley.com/reference-management/web-importer.

For Google Chrome, if you already have the earlier version of Mendeley Web Importer installed, the new version will overwrite the existing version automatically.

For Firefox, you will need to uninstall the previous version and install the new one.

We expect to release ports to Microsoft Edge and Safari later in 2020.

What’s next?

The new Mendeley Web Importer is designed to save you time and simplify your research workflow.

We always welcome your feedback on how to improve our solutions and services, so do let us know your thoughts on the new Mendeley Web Importer using our feedback form or using the ‘Send feedback’ link in the new Web Importer settings page.

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Mendeley Web Importer is just one of Mendeley’s reference management tools available to help you build your knowledge. Find out more about reference management from Mendeley here.

Looking for advice on effectively building your knowledgebase? Take a look at this Elsevier Connect article on key steps to collecting and organizing research.

What were the most popular papers of 2019?

Mendeley 2019 Papers Image“Best of the year” lists always catch our eye. They’re a great way to check if we missed any important movies, books or news. They also show us what our peers focused on and suggest trends for the coming year.

In that spirit, we’ve compiled this list of the most popular papers of 2019. These open access articles were trending in the Mendeley Catalog in 2019, meaning that they had the largest growth in readership over the course of the year.

There’s one paper across eight major disciplines of science: computer science; education; physics and astronomy; environmental science; medicine; neuroscience; chemistry; and material science. It’s fascinating to see the range of topics of interest across these disciplines, including artificial intelligence, conservation, memory and process improvement.

The Mendeley Catalog is an ever-growing resource that currently contains over 300 million research papers. You can search the entire Catalog using the search tool that appears in the main toolbar in your Mendeley.com interface. You can also get personalized recommendations of new papers to read from Mendeley Suggest by creating a Mendeley account.

Computer Science

Methods for interpreting and understanding deep neural networks
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/methods-interpreting-understanding-deep-neural-networks/

Abstract extract:
“This paper provides an entry point to the problem of interpreting a deep neural network model and explaining its predictions […] The set of methods covered here is not exhaustive, but sufficiently representative to discuss a number of questions in interpretability, technical challenges, and possible applications.”

Computer Science Figure
Fig. 8. Simple Taylor decomposition applied to a convolutional DNN trained on MNIST, and resulting explanations. Red and blue colors indicate positive and negative relevance scores.

 

Education

The Use of Cronbach’s Alpha When Developing and Reporting Research Instruments in Science Education
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/cronbachs-alpha-developing-reporting-research-instruments-science-education/

Abstract extract:
“Cronbach’s alpha is a statistic commonly quoted by authors to demonstrate that tests and scales that have been constructed or adopted for research projects are fit for purpose […] This article explores how this statistic is used in reporting science education research and what it represents.”

Physics and Astronomy

Theory of dynamic critical phenomena
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/theory-dynamic-critical-phenomena/

Abstract extract:
“When a system is brought to a critical phase transition, such as the gas-liquid critical point where the density difference between liquid and gas disappears, or the Curie point of a ferromagnet where the spontaneous magnetization disappears, many of its properties exhibit singular behavior.”

Environmental Science

Human–Wildlife Conflict and Coexistence
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/humanwildlife-conflict-coexistence/

Abstract extract:
“Recent advances in our understanding of conflict have led to a growing number of positive conservation and coexistence outcomes. I summarize and synthesize factors that contribute to conflict, approaches that mitigate conflict and encourage coexistence, and emerging trends and debates.”

Medicine

Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980: A pooled analysis of 751 population-based studies with 4.4 million participants
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/worldwide-trends-diabetes-since-1980-pooled-analysis-751-populationbased-studies-44-million-particip/

Abstract extract:
“One of the global targets for non-communicable diseases is to halt, by 2025, the rise in the age standardised adult prevalence of diabetes at its 2010 levels. We aimed to estimate worldwide trends in diabetes, how likely it is for countries to achieve the global target, and how changes in prevalence, together with population growth and ageing, are affecting the number of adults with diabetes.”

Medicine Figure
Figure 7.

 

Neuroscience

Competition between engrams influences fear memory formation and recall
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/competition-between-engrams-influences-fear-memory-formation-recall/

Abstract extract:
“Collections of cells called engrams are thought to represent memories. Although there has been progress in identifying and manipulating single engrams, little is known about how multiple engrams interact to influence memory. In lateral amygdala (LA), neurons with increased excitability during training outcompete their neighbors for allocation to an engram. We examined whether competition based on neuronal excitability also governs the interaction between engrams.”

Chemistry

The state of understanding of the lithium-ion-battery graphite solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and its relationship to formation cycling
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/state-understanding-lithiumionbattery-graphite-solid-electrolyte-interphase-sei-relationship-formati/

Abstract extract:
“An in-depth historical and current review is presented on the science of lithium-ion battery (LIB) solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation on the graphite anode, including structure, morphology, composition, electrochemistry, and formation mechanism.”

Chemistry figure
Fig. 1. Energetics of the formation of the anode and cathode SEI layers under electroreduction and electro-oxidation conditions [21]. “Reprinted (adapted) with permission from (Goodenough, J. B.; Kim, Y. Chemistry of Materials 2010, 22, 587). Copyright (2010) American Chemical Society.”

Material Science

Surface texture metrology for metal additive manufacturing: a review
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/surface-texture-metrology-metal-additive-manufacturing-review/

Abstract extract:
“A comprehensive analysis of literature pertaining to surface texture metrology for metal additive manufacturing has been performed. This review paper structures the results of this analysis into sections that address specific areas of interest: industrial domain; additive manufacturing processes and materials; types of surface investigated; surface measurement technology and surface texture characterisation.”

Material Science figure
Fig. 4. A typical truncheon artefact [49].Enter a caption

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