We’ve listened to our users and are refocusing on what’s important to them

Concentrating our services on the tools that are providing the most value towards our users’ work – reference management, research data management and citation solutions. What does it mean for the Mendeley Community?

At Mendeley, we aim to help researchers work even more efficiently so they can spend their time making discoveries.

As Head of Reference Management Laura Thomson says:

“We want to take reference management off researchers’ minds by making all the tasks related to collecting, organizing, reading, annotating and citing as simple as possible.”

To ensure we are supporting researchers as effectively as we can, we regularly review what our users show us and tell us they need and value most.

Based on our evolving understanding of our customers’ needs, Mendeley is increasing its focus on its core reference management, research data management and citation tools.

In recent months, we have made many improvements:

  • The new Mendeley Reference Manager now features real-time sync of a user’s document library to the cloud, so that there’s no delay in seeing changes made to their library across all their devices.
  • We built a new citation add-in, Mendeley Cite, as a standalone extension for Microsoft Word so that it can additionally be used in the browser with Office 365 and with Word for iPad without the Mendeley Desktop app.
  • Our refreshed Mendeley Web Importer now leverages Mendeley’s catalog of open access links as well as industry partnerships such as GetFTR to help maximize convenient access to full texts and save researchers even more time in importing them to their libraries.
  • Mendeley Data has expanded coverage to more than 25 million datasets over 2000 data repositories, making researcher data even more findable and citable.

To focus on providing the best possible service and experience for the users of these tools, we will simplify Mendeley and retire the following features from December 2020:

  • Mendeley Feed and Public Groups
  • Mendeley Profiles
  • Mendeley Funding

Our customers can find out more about what this means for them on this page in our Support Center which we’ll be keeping regularly updated.

The new Mendeley Reference Manager is now available and we will continually improve the tool based the feedback of our users. Mendeley Desktop continues to be supported and we remain committed to our Mendeley Institutional Edition customers. Mendeley has always had open public APIs, and we maintain these as part of our commitment to interoperability, which is one of our four core principles, together with source neutrality, transparency and user control.

Mendeley exists because every researcher faces challenges with building their knowledge, being personally organized and efficiently preparing articles for submission. We continue our core mission of dedicated support to researchers in achieving these goals and intend to keep Mendeley available free of charge.

Mendeley has been helping researchers simplify their workflow and accelerate their research for many years now, and we look forward to continuing to do this for many years to come.

– Rose L’Huillier, EVP Researcher Products

How to add your Mendeley Advisor certification to your LinkedIn profile

A LinkedIn profile is popular way to organize and showcase your education and career experience. This is also a great platform to add any licenses or certificates you achieve, like your Mendeley Advisor status.  

In this quick guide, we’ll help you add your Mendeley Advisor certification and badge to your LinkedIn profile.


First things first

Please make sure you have successfully registered as a Mendeley Advisor by visiting our Mendeley Advisor Community page, clicking “Register as an Advisor” and filling out the form.

Get started

  1. Sign into LinkedIn with your existing account, or if you are new to LinkedIn, create a new account for free
  2. Navigate to your profile and scroll down to the Licenses & certifications section
  3. Click the “+” icon to the right to add a new entry

In the new window, enter in your details:

  • Name = Mendeley Advisor
  • Issuing Organization = Mendeley (choose the first Mendeley result with the red logo that auto-populates)
  • Check the box next to “This credential does not expire”
  • Enter in the month and year you achieved your certification (this can be an estimate if you don’t know your exact date)
  • Leave credential ID blank
  • Credential URL = https://www.mendeley.com/advisor-community
  • Click “save”

And you’re all set. Now your Mendeley Advisor certification is proudly displayed on your LinkedIn profile for all to see. Congratulations!

Advisor of the month: Heidi Jørgensen

What is your name and job title?

My name is Heidi Jørgensen and I am a librarian.

Where do you work?

I work at University College Absalon, Campus Næstved, Denmark.

How did you get into your field?

I graduated in 1996 from The Royal School of Librarianship in Denmark. I was immediately offered a job at a public library but learned quickly that it was the academic part that had my interest. I was employed at The Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library in Copenhagen, both as a librarian but also as a consultant for the institutes. However the capital was not for me, I have therefore been working at University College Absalon for the past 18 years where we educate:
Bachelor in Biomedical Laboratory Science
Bachelor in Nursing
Bachelor in Occupational Therapy
Bachelor in Physiotherapy
Bachelor in Public Administration

Where do you do work the best?

When I am able to help students or teachers find scientific literature on exactly what they are looking for. Seeing that what they learn, allows them to move forward with their projects. For me, it is equally important whether they will learn to search databases such as PubMed, Scopus etc. or whether they will just learn to use Mendeley so they can cite their sources correctly.

How long have you been using Mendeley?

For six years and an advisor for five years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I have used RefMan/EndNote.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I became an advisor because this was the best way for me to get to know all about Mendeley and even to come up with new ideas on how to use it.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Tycho Brahe (1546 –1601). He was a Danish nobleman, astronomer, astrologer, alchemist, and writer known for his accurate and comprehensive astronomical observations.
Tycho was also famous for his contributions to medicine; his herbal medicines were in use as late as the 1900s. This is where we have a common interest and it would have been a privilege to learn from him.
We also have an expression in Scandinavia “Tycho Brahe days” which refers to a number of “unlucky days” – I think we all can relate to that.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Klaris, H. W. (2015). Skyggernes bog. Sorø: Tellerup.
(I used drag and drop from Mendeley)
[The Book of Shadows]. Every year I make a Christmas calendar for all the students at Absalon (10.000+) with gifts. It is an online event with quizzes about Christmas, Absalon, but indeed also about the resources that we, as a library, offer the students. Mendeley has been a part of our quiz since I started the tradition. This year we got more than 5.000 copies of this book to use as gifts. I thought I’d better read it.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I bought truffle mycelium and have now learned how to plant it along with the roots of a tree. If it works, I will know in approx. five years but then I should also be able to harvest both black and white truffles. I do not quite trust it, but it was very interesting!

What is the best part about working in research?

The best part for me, as a librarian, is when students realize that they are able to find the latest research within their field of study. It gives me hope that in the future when they work in our Health Care System they will keep doing this and provide the best care for our citizens.

And access! It is impossible to have access to all the resources that the users want. It is a matter of prioritizing which subscriptions you choose to subscribe to. Many are expensive and the funds are unfortunately not enough.

Do you have any advice for young researchers?

Stay updated. Make a search string that fits your subject area and create an alert. This will help you to stay updated.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Your Mendeley Web Library is changing to the new Mendeley Reference Manager

Get ready for a new and improved reference management experience.

As part of our plans to help researchers manage their references more efficiently, all Mendeley Web Libraries have migrated to the new Mendeley Reference Manager.

Your Web Library has automatically migrated, and you can now access all the features of the new system.

The new Mendeley Reference Manager offers you:

  • A cloud-based library that automatically syncs so your changes are instantly accessible across locations, devices and Mendeley tools such as the desktop app and Mendeley Cite
  • Identical functionality and appearance across Mendeley Reference Manager online and desktop that will allow you to seamlessly switch between the two versionsMRM library 2
  • Offline mode that ensures you can continue working wherever you are, and be confident that changes to your library will auto-sync when you’re back online
  • New features and functionality to help make managing your references even simpler, such as the new Mendeley Notebook which helps you collate all your highlights and notes from multiple PDFs
  • A highly stable platform that will be regularly updated with new and improved features in response to your needs and changes in technology

The desktop version of the new Mendeley Reference Manager is also available to download. Find out more and download it here! Please note, however, that Mendeley Desktop is still available for use should you wish to keep using that version.

We’re thrilled to bring you this new and improved reference management solution. Remember to sign in and check out your library’s new home.

For any questions about this migration and the new Mendeley Reference Manager, visit the Mendeley Support Center.

Advisor of the month: Nick Hood

Nick HoodWhat is your name and job title?

My name is Nick Hood and I am a Senior Teaching Fellow in Secondary Education.

Where do you work?

I work at the Moray House School of Education and Sport at the University of Edinburgh.

How did you get into your field?

I took the long way round. I spent some years in the military and aerospace before starting my own software business. Part of that business involved training others in programming and data manipulation, and that led me to become a physics and mathematics teacher. I moved into teacher education about eight years ago.

Where do you do work the best?

Honestly, I think my best work is in supporting people who find our programmes challenging. Part of my job is as a personal tutor, where I get to work one-to-one with people who struggle with aspects of our very intensive postgraduate courses. Sometimes this is more pastoral, but often it is about getting to grips with academic writing.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

About eight years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Good old manual methods. I just typed what I wanted on the page.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

A friend and colleague was our local Mendeley Advisor and when she hinted that she would retire, I thought I’d step up.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

A scientist who had an idea that saved millions of lives, Robert Watson-Watt. Or, if I am allowed a fictional researcher, Hari Seldon from Asimov’s Foundation series of stories.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Barthes, R. (1980) Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, Hill and Wang.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

How to take photographs in infrared.

What is the best part about working in research?

I like learning how to manipulate and present data for understanding – sometimes that is a matter of drawing a picture.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Getting away from distractions that frustrate understanding of the thing you are trying to make sense of. We all know that moment when we can almost clearly see some complex idea, when we are so close that we can nearly touch it – and the email pings, or a knock at the door collapses it all like a house of cards.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is the smart choice for the complex task of managing your sources when writing for academic or professional purposes.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Get organised early. Establish your workflow. Use tools that get out of the way of your research activities and your data.


Find out more about Nick by following and viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

 

Advisor of the Month: Andi Anto Patak

What is your name and job title?

My name is Andi Anto Patak and I am a senior lecturer at Universitas Negeri Makassar in Indonesia.

How did you enter your field and what is your research focus?

I completed my Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in English Education at Universitas Negeri Makassar, then went on to a Ph.D. in Measurement and Evaluation at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.

The development of extensive literacy and research has interested me for many years. I have published several Mendeley-themed papers in Scopus-indexed journals as well as two books about Mendeley, which both came out in 2012. My first was also the first ever Indonesian-language book about Mendeley (*editor’s note: maybe even the first book about Mendeley!*). It had a print run of 1,000: 300 copies were sold and 700 were distributed free to students and lecturers.

My second book was also in Indonesian and also had a print run of 1,000. With this book, 500 copies were sold and the remaining 500 were distributed free. Digital versions of both books are available online and for free.

Here are links to my books:

Mendeley: Citation & PDF Reference Manager plus Jejaring Sosial by Andi Anto Patak, Erwin Akib – Books on Google Play (published in 2012).

Hindari Plagiat dengan Mendeley by Andi Anto Patak, Erwin Akib – Books on Google Play (Published in 2015)

I hope that everyone who has a passion for writing can have easy access to Mendeley. My current research is focused on developing a Mendeley-based thesis submission model that helps to avoid plagiarism.

What is your history with Mendeley?

I have used Mendeley for more than eight years. In the first year of my PhD, I used EndNote. For a short while after I discovered Mendeley, I used the two solutions together. Then I found that reference management was simpler with Mendeley — it was more user friendly for writing dissertations and papers too. So I switched full time to Mendeley.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

Because I find Mendeley easy to use, I decided to become a Mendeley Advisor. I’m able to invite fellow international students in Malaysia and my colleagues in Indonesia to jointly use Mendeley for writing dissertations, articles, research papers and other publications.

What academics, researchers or librarians would you like to work with or meet?

Professor Wendy Sutherland Smith of Deakin University, Australia, who pioneered research on plagiarism.

What is the best part of working in research?

The best part of being a researcher is finding the gaps in knowledge where we can research. Also, I like when we can find the full text of all the relevant references for a research project!

And the most challenging part?

The most challenging part is trying to work with participants who do not honestly respond to data collection.

What is one thing that you want people to know about Mendeley?

I created a Facebook group to let people know about Mendeley events in Indonesia and get feedback from Indonesian Mendeley users. You can find it here: Indonesian Mendeley Community.

Find out more about Andi by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Advisor of the Month: Juliana Soares Lima

What is your name and job title?

My name is Juliana Soares Lima. I am a Reference Librarian at the Human Sciences Library of the Federal University of Ceará, located in the Northeast region of Brazil. I have graduated in Librarianship and completed my master’s degree in Information Science at the same institution that I work.

How did you get into your field?

I’ve always enjoyed reading and I love researching many things. I was also very happy to help other people get the information they needed, especially to exercise their rights and citizenship, so it’s not hard to deduce that this ‘curiosity’ would lead me to Librarianship and Information Science. From the day I discovered that I could work with books, information and knowledge to help and support in academic/scientific research, and somehow make a difference in people’s lives, then I decided that I wanted to be a librarian.

Where do you do work the best?

I feel fortunate to work in the Humanities area, as it is a field that is usually related to other areas of knowledge. So, I work better in an environment that allows me to live with the diversity of knowledge and people, that is, an environment in which open access to scientific knowledge is discussed; or about technology but without leaving aside what makes us human; and discuss politics and progress without forgetting the poverty and social problems that afflict Brazil and other countries.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I’ve been using Mendeley for 6 years. Since 2017 I have been a Mendeley Advisor.

Which solutions were you using prior to Mendeley?

I used to make references manually. Then I discovered some reference builders online and started using them, but I missed something that would allow me to go beyond building references, I wanted to manage them using some software. As a librarian, I usually use and research these tools and after a long search I found the reference managers Endnote, Mendeley, Zotero and others. I usually offer training in all three (Endnote, Mendeley, Zotero), but Mendeley is quite successful during training sessions because of the variety of functions and resources, as well as storage space has been an essential factor when comparing three software.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

First, the nature of my work in the reference service, I usually teach, organize courses and other training courses that help the institution’s researchers to be successful in their research in databases and in the use of resources offered by the library, as well as the reference managers.

From the huge acceptance and the increase in the use of Mendeley in the institution, I decided to become Mendeley Advisor to always be aware of the news about the software and to be able to better assist the public served in the library. So that this objective could be reached, at the time, I led a series of actions to expand Mendeley’s reach at the Federal University of Ceará. I invited two more librarian colleagues (Edvander Pires and Izabel Lima) from the institution to help promote Mendeley in each Campus and increase the number of training and users. Together, we held face-to-face training sessions on Mendeley and then we developed tutorials that were posted on the library’s institutional website. During all the courses I also created a badge for students who want to help promote Mendeley to use it in their photos on Facebook or Twitter profiles. After that, we decided to create video classes and I did some tests before using Google Classroom to teach people how to use Mendeley. Each of us recorded the lessons and I edited them. All video lessons are available on YouTube.

Currently, during the month of May and June 2020,  I am teaching Mendeley for two classes in the Google Classroom, each class there are 250 students.

Video lessons: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSaJUgnz0jg&list=PLOhWAljyF7ro5h0nMSA38Jj9en04JO3X6

Twibbon #ILoveMendeley: https://twibbon.com/support/ilovemendeley

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Dead: 1) Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan, (born August 9, 1892, Madras, India — died September 27, 1972, Bangalore), Indian librarian and educator who was considered the father of Library Science in India and whose contributions had worldwide influence; 2) Aaron Swartz, he was an American computer programmer, entrepreneur, writer, political organizer, and Internet hacktivist. He was involved in the development of the web feed format RSS, the Markdown publishing format and the Creative Commons Licenses.

Alive: I am lucky to know and have worked with my advisor in the master’s degree, Professor Giovanna Guedes, but there are still so many good people that I wanted to meet in person! Antonio Agenor Briquet de Lemos (Retired professor at the University of Brasília); Professor Murilo Bastos, Michael Buckland, Tim Berners-Lee, Alice Meadows (NISO’s Director of Community Engagement), Christine Borgman (Distinguished Research Professor Information Studies University of California, Los Angeles), Luciano Floridi (Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford), Peter Suber, Lawrence Lessig.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Habibi, authored by Craig Thompson. It is a graphic novel set in a fictional landscape of Islamic fairy tales that describes the relationship between two slave children on the run.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

In Brazil, we are going through a difficult period in which we have to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic and with government conflicts. It has been difficult; I can say that every week I learn something new even working from home. I have more and more faith and certainty that the sharing of information, scientific knowledge and the intense work of researchers can bring a global solution in the fight against COVID-19. Meanwhile, during this week, I am learning to balance household chores and work activities better than the previous month. Also, this week I’m learning to be resilient.

What is the best part about working in research?

There are many wonderful things in the development of research. I believe that there is no single best part, as it is a set of steps that complement each other: a) from the conception of the idea of a study; b) the search for scientific literature that supports the study; c) experiences from field research; d) the surprises that occur during the research; e) the discovery and exploitation of results, etc.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

There is no easy search! This is the good and the bad part at the same time.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

I want users to know how they can take advantage of Mendeley and explore all the available functions: managing references, building a profile on Mendeley online, depositing research data in Mendeley Data, using Mendeley to make systematic reviews and more.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

My advice is to keep studying and updating, especially nowadays when everything changes very quickly and we need to be prepared to obtain new knowledge and skills that we didn’t have before. Always adapt, renew and reinvent yourself. Don’t settle. Life is movement and we need to keep up with trends, however, without ever forgetting to value the classic and universal knowledge that remains current even after so many years. Be curious. Research and try to be critical: not everything written in a book, article or other material represents an absolute truth because in all knowledge there is a limit, a strength and a weakness.

 

Find out more about Juliana by viewing her Mendeley profile.

 Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

The June 2020 Advisor Briefing: New reference manager updates, more teaching materials and how we support the SDGs

While the physical Mendeley office has been quiet, our teams haven’t been! We’ve spent the last few months working hard on continuing to develop the new Mendeley Reference Manager and looking at ways to help you better promote Mendeley.

June’s Advisor Briefing topics include:

  • Mendeley Reference Manager updates
  • New Mendeley resources for librarians and other educators
  • Matching published research to Sustainable Development Goals

You can watch the recording here

Questions?  Reach out at community@mendeley.com

 

Enjoy an easy and fast route to published journal articles

Get Full Text Research (GetFTR) is an exciting new collaboration that provides researchers with more seamless access to journal articles directly through online research platforms, without any need to use multiple login methods.

The initial pilot has just launched on Mendeley as well as other scholarly platforms, and at present highlights entitlement rights and provides fast links from five major publishers: the American Chemical Society, Elsevier, Springer Nature, Taylor & Francis Group and Wiley. More publishers are expected to join this initial group soon. You might already be able to try GetFTR on Mendeley if your institution has signed up to the relevant access services.

Here’s how it works: Imagine you’re searching for a journal article on Mendeley, GetFTR will add a “View PDF” link beside every article that’s included in your institution’s journal subscriptions. If you’ve recently authenticated at your institution, simply click the link and it will take you straight to the full-text article. If you haven’t authenticated recently, you’ll be directed to your institution’s login page to check your credentials. Providing quick and easy access to knowledge, even when you’re off campus, is now even more important than ever.

GetFTR in action

This pilot will be used to gather feedback on the new service – assessing its accuracy, effectiveness and technical robustness – in order to better meet the needs of researchers. Simultaneously, more research solutions are working on integrating GetFTR.

Elsevier is excited to be part of Get Full Text Research as a publisher and provider of research solutions. We hope Mendeley users who are part of the pilot will enjoy the direct route to articles, and look forward to hearing from you. Please do get in touch with any questions or feedback at support@getfulltextresearch.com.

Mendeley’s participation in this initiative is part of a wider aim to support researchers to easily discover and seamlessly access relevant research. Researchers can visit Mendeley to search over 100million cross-publisher articles, get 1-click access to over 70million PDFs where available and benefit from readership insights and relevant further reading recommendations. Find out more here.

Advisor of the Month: Yahaya Gavamukulya

Editor’s note:  We’d like to congratulate Dr. Gavamukulya on finishing his PhD and inspiring a new group of Mendeley Advisors!

What is your name and job title?

I am Dr Gavamukulya Yahaya (PhD), a Lecturer in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Busitema University, Mbale – Uganda. I am also a dynamic Global Mendeley Advisor.

How did you get into your field?

Quite a very long story, but to sum it all up, passion led me where I am and has helped me stay here.

Where do you work the best?

In an environment with people who not only take me as a colleague, but get to learn and understand each and every one as an individual yet moving together as a team. Reciprocally, I really enjoy knowing everyone in my work environment as a person rather than just knowing them as colleagues, students, peers among others.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I have been using Mendeley for 6 years, 4 of which have been as an Advisor.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

It’s quite embarrassing, but I was adding references manually without any reference manager.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

With resources on the website, I taught myself how to use Mendeley and it took me some time before perfecting it. Once I perfected and became experienced in all the features, and with the gaps analysis in the communities I was living in, I decided to enroll as an Advisor in order to help train and enroll as many people as possible in order for them not to go through what I used to go through prior to discovering Mendeley. Additionally, research being at the core of our training, having a resource person with interest and expertise in guiding learners through Mendeley becomes an added advantage to the Institutions. I have so far recruited, enrolled and trained more than 1,700 Mendeley users globally.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Prof Kary Banks Mullis (December 28, 1944 – August 7, 2019), just to thank him for the revolutionary technology of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).

What is the best part about working in research?

Navigating uncharted waters and eventually creating a trail…

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Uncertainty…

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is here to accompany them through the entire research journey.

Do you have an advice for young researchers? 

Passion, Passion, Passion, Patience, Perseverance and the correct team… It shall keep you there even when the going gets tough.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Find out more about Dr. Gavamukulya by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.