Augmented Reality helps us see the world and each other in new ways.

Mendeley Brainstorm – Augmented Reality – We Have a Winner!

Augmented Reality helps us see the world and each other in new ways.
Augmented Reality helps us see the world and each other in new ways.

Many thanks to all those who entered the Mendeley Brainstorm related to Augmented Reality; picking a winner given all the well thought out answers was not a straightforward matter, however in the end, we selected Carol from the University of Manitoba’s response:

I think a really obvious app for AR would be an emotion recognition app. There are already emotion recognition apps that allow people to look at photos and select which emotion the person is expressing and there is software that analyzes the emotion in video content. Augmented reality would be the next logical step. For those individuals with Social Anxiety, Autism Spectrum Disorders or certain types of Traumatic Brain injury and others who have a difficult time recognizing social cues and/or emotions. They could simply check a “message” and learn if the person is stressed/calm/indifferent. It wouldn’t hurt for single people doing the dating thing either!

We asked her what inspired her. She responded:

…I know several people with difficulty recognizing emotions/social cues for a variety of reasons and it seemed to me to be a natural fit for an augmented reality app. Could you imagine the sheer processing power that it would require to do real-time emotional recognition?

That sounds like a challenge. Carol also told us:

By the way love the Mendeley product and am having a blast teaching it to my library clients at the University of Manitoba. It makes me look like a guru.😉 Thanks for making it easy.

You’re welcome, Carol!

Those who didn’t win this time are encouraged to respond to the latest Mendeley Brainstorm, regarding Assistive Technology. Thanks again to all our participants.

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Ask science anything with #MendeleyWall @ New Scientist Live 22-25th September

If I could ask science anything…

Mendeley is inviting attendees of New Scientist Live to ask our community, and the wider scientific world, all their deep burning questions about science! Mendeley’s mission is to help researchers showcase their work to the world and this is a great opportunity to connect researchers and experts with the general public.

We’ll be collecting people’s questions through the medium of a message wall and Tweeting questions to our 15,000 followers using #MendeleyWall during the whole New Scientist Live event (22th – 25th September).

We’re at stand number 1224 near the Brains & Body demonstration area, so if you are attending come and say hi!

Besides the Great Mendeley Wall, our stand will feature hands-on science and technology activities. All the activities follow our Mendeley Hack Day idea in that they are reproducible and accessible to DIY.

Learn how to build a smartphone microscope, see and feel microscopic objects made tangible by our 3D printer, try some coding projects, and learn more about Citizen Science and how you can get involved with research!

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We invite you, to use us as conduit for connecting with the New Scientist Live audience (an expected 25,000 attendees) by helping answer #MendeleyWall questions via Twitter, and hopefully inspiring people to walk away with a newly-ignited passion for science. We’ll be aligning topics with the New Scientist Live core themes, so expect questions on Earth, Cosmos, Technology, and Brain & Body.

To find out more about the #MendeleyWall and how you can get involved please feel free to reach out to jonathan.beyer@mendeley.com to discuss, please keep an eye on #MendeleyWall during the show and jump in if you see a question that you can answer!

Or if you have any questions you’d like answered comment down below.

There are still discount tickets available for the event here.

Follow us on social media to keep up to date
https://twitter.com/mendeley_com
https://www.facebook.com/mendeley

Thanks to assistive technologies, impaired no longer means disabled.

Mendeley Brainstorm: Assistive Technology – Powerful and Pervasive

Thanks to assistive technologies, impaired no longer means disabled.
Thanks to assistive technologies, impaired no longer means disabled.

The Paralympic Games open on September 7th; they are a visible example of how powerful and pervasive assistive technology has become. This month, we’re asking: what is the most innovative assistive technology application you’ve seen?  We are looking for the most well thought out answer to this question in up to 150 words: use the comment feature below the blog and please feel free to promote your research!  The winner will receive an Amazon gift certificate worth $50 and a bag full of Mendeley items; competition closes September 28th.

Powerful and Pervasive Technologies

Assistive technologies are diminishing physical limitations.  During the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, the delegates were addressed by Rep. Tammy Duckworth of Illinois.  She strode to and from the podium, fully mobile, despite having lost her legs while serving in the military.

The forthcoming Paralympic Games are another powerful illustration that impairment does not mean disabled: competition is conducted at the highest level.  New materials (such as carbon fibre) combined with engineering nous have created products such as the “Flex-Foot Cheetahwhich enable athletes to run who could not otherwise have walked. Other technologies compensate for the absence or impairment of senses.

For the Elderly Too

These technologies also assist the elderly. A “Smart Walker”, for example, can have a range of functionality including an “Advanced human–machine interface” in addition to providing physical support. (Martins et al., 2012, p. 555) One type of “Smart Walker” is the “SIMBIOSIS”: “This walker presents a multisensory biomechanical platform for predictive human–machine cooperation….the forces that are applied by the user on each forearm-support while walking are measured and the guidance information can be inferred. This turns out to be a natural and transparent interface that does not need previous training by the user.” (Martins et al., 2012, p. 558)

The Future?

It’s clear that assistive technology is enhancing lives, but what is the most innovative application you’ve encountered?  Tell us!

Try Elsevier DataSearch!

DataSearch results
Partial results for DataSearch lookup for “Flex-foot Cheetah”

Note: much more information for researchers can be found via Elsevier Datasearch (https://datasearch.elsevier.com/):  DataSearch works with reputable repositories across the Internet to help researchers readily find the data sets they need to accelerate their work. DataSearch offers a new and innovative approach.  Most search engines don’t actively involve their users in making them better; we invite you, the user, to join our User Panel and advise how we can improve the results.  We are looking for researchers in a variety of fields, no technical expertise is required (though welcomed).  In order to join us, visit https://datasearch.elsevier.com and click on the button marked “Join Our User Panel”.

About Mendeley Brainstorms

Our Brainstorms are challenges so we can engage with you, our users, on the hottest topics in the world of research.  We look for the most in-depth and well thought through responses; the best response as judged by the Mendeley team will earn a prize.

References

MARTINS, M., SANTOS, C., FRIZERA-NETO, A. and CERES, R. (2012). Assistive mobility devices focusing on Smart Walkers: Classification and review. Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 60(4), pp.548-562.

Össur Americas. (2016) Flex-Foot Cheetah. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.ossur.com/prosthetic-solutions/products/sport-solutions/cheetah. [Accessed 10 August 2016].

DataSearch homepage.

Introducing Elsevier DataSearch

Elsevier takes the next step in making researchers’ lives easier with the new DataSearch engine.  You can search for research data across numerous domains and various types, from a host of domain-specific and cross-domain data repositories. It’s available at (https://datasearch.elsevier.com/) – please join our User Panel to help improve it!

More Focused Searching

Mass search engines are ubiquitous and useful; however, when it comes to specific information tailored to the needs of the modern researcher, a more focused application is required.  In response to this need, Elsevier has created DataSearch.  Drawing on reputable repositories of information across the internet, researchers can readily find the data sets they need to accelerate their work.

DataSearch offers a new and innovative approach.  Most search engines don’t actively involve their users in making them better; we invite you, the user, to join our User Panel and advise how we can improve the results.  We are looking for users in a variety of fields, no technical expertise is required (though welcomed).  In order to join us, visit https://datasearch.elsevier.com and click on the button marked “Join Our User Panel”. Please detail in your e-mail the following:

  • Your Name
  • Institution
  • Research Interests

We look forward to working with you and improving the research experience.

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Save up to £9 on New Scientist Live tickets!

New Scientist Live – the UK’s biggest festival of ideas and inspiration, launches this September and Mendeley will be joining in the fun with some special activities on the show floor!!!

New Scientist Live is 22 – 25 September 2016, at ExCeL London.

The inaugural New Scientist Live event, courtesy of the team behind the world’s most popular science weekly, is a four-day festival of ideas and discovery taking place at ExCeL London.

Rooted in the biggest, best and most provocative science that touches all areas of human life, the show will feature over 100 exhibitors, 120 speakers (inc. Tim Peake & Dara O Briain), 5 theatres and 4 immersive zones covering Brain & Body, Technology, Earth and The Cosmos to showcase how science, technology and engineering drive our economy, shape our culture and improve our lives.

You’ll be able to find us at stand 1224 in the Brain & Body zone, full details of what Mendeley’s activities on the day will be announced soon!

For further information and the timetable of the talks taking place visit www.newscientistlive.com.

Book your place now and save

As a friend of Mendeley, you can get an exclusive discounted rate on tickets*

Book £40 VIP tickets (giving you guaranteed access to the Main Stage talks) on Thursday or Friday of the event – a saving of £5 per ticket

Or, book standard admission tickets on Thursday or Friday at the show for just £20 – saving £9 per ticket on the door rate

Tickets for Saturday or Sunday at the show are just £22.50 – saving £6.50 per ticket on the door rate

To book, quote MEND16 on the booking page at www.newscientistlive.com or call 0844 581 1295

Children 12 and under go free when accompanied by an adult

*transaction fee applies, must be booked by midnight 21/9/16

IT expert touching a hexagon grid with the letters AR for augmented reality and surrounding fields of usage

Mendeley Brainstorm: Augmented Reality — Here and Now

 

IT expert touching a hexagon grid with the letters AR for augmented reality and surrounding fields of usage
IT expert touching a hexagon grid with the letters AR for augmented reality and surrounding fields of usage

 

“Pokemon Go” has made Augmented Reality wildly popular; this month, we’re asking in our latest Brainstorm competition – what Augmented Reality innovation do you think will be the next “killer app”? We are looking for the most well thought out answer to this question in up to 150 words: use the comment feature below the blog and please feel free to promote your research! The winner will receive an Amazon gift certificate worth $50 and a bag full of Mendeley items; competition closes September 6th.

It’s usual to see people constantly staring at their mobile phones; it used to be that they were just texting friends or awaiting the latest post on social media. However, there is now a burgeoning tribe of gamers who squint, peer, then shift their phone around; they’re hunting for virtual creatures which are visible only to the eye of augmented reality. This craze has become so widespread that even the leader of the UK Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, spent part of his time on a Sunday political programme hunting for virtual creatures rather than expounding on his policies. (Jeremy Corbyn learns to play Pokemon Go, 2016)

AR is nothing new; in 2012, Google launched “Google Glass”, a headset which integrated Google information with what users could see in front of them. In turn, users could take photographs and video. It wasn’t a commercial success; it broke the First Rule of Wearable Technology as described by the inventor of the NFC Ring (www.nfcring.com), John McClear: “Wearable technology shouldn’t be ugly!” Furthermore, users were also concerned that they were in effect sharing their lives with Google. Finally, there were safety concerns: a person paying attention to a virtual object may not take sufficient notice of real ones.

Despite the setbacks, augmented reality is becoming increasingly prevalent in the fields of medicine, architecture, education, and tourism. For example, AR is rapidly becoming a valuable tool for surgeons: while minimally invasive procedures have made patients’ lives easier, nevertheless, these “techniques bring up new difficulties for surgeons by greatly reducing their usual abilities” such as touch and depth perception. (Nicolau et al., 2011 p. 190) Though utilizing AR in this scenario has limitations (such as the fact that living beings aren’t rigid in their positioning), it was concluded “interactive augmented reality is a relevant approach to provide intra-operatively additional information to surgeons. This information usually can help for port positioning and give them confidence by showing them hidden structures at some steps with an accuracy which seems sufficient to them.” (Nicolau et al., 2011 p. 196)

Mobile Augmented Reality applications are also being tested in Greece to enhance the tourist experience; an application called “CorfuAR” “supports personalized content provision and navigation features to tourists on the move”. (Kourouthanassis et al, 2015, p. 72) The user journey can be personalized on the phone app according to interest: business, culture, religion, shopping, nightlife, gastronomy, nature study, tripping and water sports. (Kourouthanassis et al, 2015, p. 77).

With these and other applications, it seems that AR is here to stay; but where else will it show up? Tell us!

About Mendeley Brainstorms

Our Brainstorms are challenges so we can engage with you, our users, on the hottest topics in the world of research. We look for the most in-depth and well thought through responses; the best response as judged by the Mendeley team will earn a prize.

References

Jeremy Corbyn learns to play Pokemon Go (2016), BBC News. [online] Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-36820874 [Accessed July 18, 2016]

KOUROUTHANASSIS, P., BOLETSIS, C., BARDAKI, C. and CHASANIDOU, D. (2015). Tourists responses to mobile augmented reality travel guides: The role of emotions on adoption behavior. Pervasive and Mobile Computing, 18, pp.71-87.

NICOLAU, S., SOLER, L., MUTTER, D. and MARESCAUX, J. (2011). Augmented reality in laparoscopic surgical oncology. Surgical Oncology, 20(3), pp.189-201.

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Beginners guide to writing a manuscript in LaTeX

Interactive course available now.

LaTeX is a document preparation system for the communication and publication of scientific documents that include complex math expressions or non-Latin scripts, such as Arabic, Sanskrit and Chinese. It is widely used in many fields in academia, including mathematics, physics, computer science, statistics, economics and political science. In LaTeX the writer uses plain text and uses mark-up tagging conventions to define the general structure of a document (such as article, book, and letter), to stylise text throughout a document (such as bold and italic), and to add citations and cross-references.

After having followed this interactive course you will be able to work with LaTeX for your manuscripts. Topics addressed are:

* Downloading the software;

* Using the software for scientific manuscripts;

* Adding equations, figures and tables;

* Output of data and documents;

* Rules, common mistakes and troubleshooting.

Understanding of all topics is checked during the course.