Insert references into your paper using Mendeley’s Web Library

You can now export references from your Mendeley Web Library into the Microsoft Word Citation Manager — without opening your Mendeley Desktop.

The export feature uses Microsoft Word’s built-in citation tool. This feature is only available on Windows for Word 2010 and above.

To export your references:

  1. Open your Mendeley Web Library
  2. Select the references you want to export
  3. Click on Export to MS Word, which will download an .xml file.
  4. Open Word and go to “References” and then “Manage Resources.”
  5. Browse your folder and select the .xml file. Your references will be available in Word’s Citation Manager.

mm_img_nl_201702_ms-word-citation-toolThe number of citation styles in Word are limited but you can install more styles from BibWord.
MS Word’s citation system is not the same system used by Mendeley Desktop. Using both on the same document will yield two sets of citations and two bibliographies.

Mendeley Brainstorm – Ageing Societies – We Have a Winner!

As societies age, there are are both challenges and opportunities.
As societies age, there are are both challenges and opportunities.

Many thanks to all those who entered the Mendeley Brainstorm related to Ageing Societies; picking a winner is never easy, in this instance, we have selected Beau Hilton’s response:

Two modifiable and interrelated aspects of aging are muscle and strength loss (sarcopenia and dynapenia). These are deleterious in obvious ways such as difficulty performing activities of daily living, as well as in indirect ways, e.g. reduction of glucose disposal into muscle may contribute to hyperglycemia, diabetes, and perhaps Alzheimer’s disease, sometimes called “type 3 diabetes.” Interventions are generally low-cost and include the conventional, such as protein (especially leucine) intake and resistance exercise, as well as innovations including blood flow restriction training, which was developed in Japan to help people maintain or increase muscle mass when unable to lift heavy weights or even move at all. Additionally, prudent use of and research on anabolic agents in both males and females is beginning to see a renaissance. What does it mean for society if the typical 75-year-old in 20xx has the physical agility of the typical 55-year-old in 2017?

We asked Beau about his background. He responded:

I am a 2nd year medical student at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. It’s a 5 year program with a research emphasis and, since it’s housed in the Clinic itself, a great deal of time with patients. My main interest is prevention and wellness, with a focus on attacking the functional deficits that most characterize old age using rational combinations of lifestyle and pharmacological means.

Those who didn’t win this time are encouraged to respond to the latest Mendeley Brainstorm, regarding Science and Politics. Thanks again to all our participants.

Mendeley Brainstorm: Science and Politics – Unhappy Together?

Is it time for researchers to adapt or go on the march?
Is it time for researchers to adapt or go on the march?

The worlds of science and politics appear to be in conflict. Britain voted for Brexit; it’s estimated 90% of British academics voted Remain. Recent policy announcements by the Trump administration have provoked scientists to plan a “March for Science” on Washington DC. Are science and politics destined to clash? We are looking for the most well thought out answer to this question in up to 150 words: use the comment feature below the blog and please feel free to promote your research! The winner will receive an Amazon gift certificate worth £50 and a bag full of Mendeley items; competition closes March 8, 2017.

Post-Factual Versus Evidence Based

The world of politics introduced new terms into the lexicon in 2016, including “post-factual”, “post-truth” and “fake news”; the world of science continues to rely on evidence, data and peer reviews. In 2016, politics erupted with statements that denounced “experts”; science depends on expertise to achieve its advances.

Funding Pressures

The Trump Administration has instructed the Environmental Protection Agency to freeze all grants. This could be a prelude to more cuts for research in environmental and other sciences. Mick Mulvaney, President Trump’s choice to head the White House’s Office of Management and Budget, apparently asked in September 2016 after considering studies done about the Zika virus, “…do we really need government funded research at all”.

What’s Next?

Can science learn to live with the new political environment, or is it time for researchers to march? Will “post factual” politics be compelled to yield to cold, hard data? Will science shift from countries like the United States and Britain to elsewhere? What are your thoughts on what will happen and what will you do? Tell us!

Need to Store & Publish Your Data?

Mendeley Data is a secure cloud-based repository where you can store your data (including open data governmental datasets and websites), ensuring it is easy to share, access and cite, wherever you are. Click here for more information.

About Mendeley Brainstorms

Our Brainstorms are challenges so we can engage with you, our users, on the hottest topics in the world of research.  We look for the most in-depth and well thought through responses; the best response as judged by the Mendeley team will earn a prize.

References

AHUJA, M. (2017). Scientists planning their own march in Washington. CNN. [online] Available at: http://edition.cnn.com/2017/01/25/politics/scientists-march-dc-trnd/index.html?sr=twCNN012617scientists-march-dc-trnd0530AMStoryPhoto&linkId=33790680 [Accessed 26 Jan. 2017].

BELLUZ, J. (2017). Trump’s budget director pick: “Do we really need government-funded research at all”. [Blog] Vox. Available at: http://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2016/12/21/14012552/trump-budget-director-research-science-mulvaney [Accessed 26 Jan. 2017].

KASPRAK, A. (2016). FACT CHECK: Trump’s Budget Director Pick Asked “Do We Really Need Government-Funded Research at All?”. [online] Snopes. Available at: http://www.snopes.com/trumps-budget-director-pick-asked-really-need-government-funded-research/ [Accessed 26 Jan. 2017].

WAPNER, J. (2017). Trump Freezes Grants, Approves Pipelines and Considers Sharp Budget Cuts At the EPA. Newsweek. [online] Available at: http://europe.newsweek.com/trump-freezes-grants-approves-pipelines-and-considers-sharp-budget-cuts-epa-547738?rm=eu [Accessed 26 Jan. 2017].

On Mendeley Careers: Brexit & Science – Brexit Means What?

As the United Kingdom departs the European Union, what is the future of British science and research?
As the United Kingdom departs the European Union, what is the future of British science and research?

On Mendeley Careers, we’ve just published an interview with Dr. Anne Forde of Cambridge University; we’re trying to get to the bottom of the complex issue of Brexit and Science in the United Kingdom:

“Brexit means Brexit” according to Prime Minister Theresa May; however, this statement masks a series of complex questions. For example, what will be the future relationship between the United Kingdom and European Union? Will Britain participate in European funding programmes such as Horizon 2020? Will researchers from the European Union still flock to Britain’s globally renowned universities to do their work? How are the universities adjusting to these seismic changes?

Click here to read the full interview.

Mendeley.com

Introducing the new Mendeley.com

Mendeley.com
The new Mendeley.com

It’s here! We’re proud to unveil the new Mendeley.com!

The new website has a clean new design, makes it easy to find all the ways in which Mendeley can help you as an academic, and helps bring our homepage into line with the fresh designs once you log into your Mendeley account.

“We wanted to update the site and improve the overall visual language, layout and navigation to make it more consistent with our other apps as well as easier for users to navigate and use,” said Matt Coulson, Head of Product. “We also wanted to use it as an opportunity to bring the information on all our products, including recently released features, bang up to date.”

How we designed our website for you, our users

User-centered design is a major part of our design process here at Mendeley, and the website was no different.

Miklos Petravich, Senior UX Designer and lead design on the homepage project, met regularly with users to ensure the website met their needs.

“We got feedback on our initial designs for our homepage where we found out while most people like the clean minimalistic direction but in the early mockups we featured inspirational messages,” said Petravich.
“Through User Discovery, we learned our users are straight-talking, straight to the point,” he said. “We originally thought inspirational messages would be interesting but we listened and learned that this is not what our users want, they want information like a list of features.”

mendeley-home-inspirational-1
Inspirational messages test design

The new website also allows us to show all the exciting new tools and products we’ve been developing to help researchers.

“We were trying to find a balance between what Mendeley is still known best for — reference manager — and how researchers can discover the tools that Mendeley now has for collaboration and showcasing the impact of their own research,” Petravich said.

What’s Next?

Not everything we changed is about design, however. “We wanted to make it easier for our in-house teams to manage the website,” said Coulson. Behind our shiny new facade is an updated content management system.  “This makes it very straightforward to make additions or amendments to the new site without writing a line of code,” he said.

Our plans for the new website are to bring you fresher content and quick updates —information that should not only help new users discover Mendeley, but also help current users find information easier. In the future, we’re going to have a review of all the content on our site and update the information, and we’re going to continue to incorporate more of your feedback.

If you live and work, or even if you are visiting the London area, we’d love to have you in for a User Discovery session. The one-hour sessions are held at our offices in Finsbury Square, and we’ll not only give you a tour of our cool space, but also send you away with a bag of Mendeley goodies and a £50 Amazon* gift card.

And, let us know what you think about the new design in the comments section below!
*If you do not want an Amazon gift card, we will work with you to find a suitable, non-cash alternative.

Mendeley Brainstorm – Open Data – We Have a Winner!

Is the future of data open?
Is the future of data open?

Many thanks to all those who entered the Mendeley Brainstorm related to Open Data; picking a winner given the well thought out answers was not easy, however in the end, we selected Sarah’s post:

When we talk about Open Data, there are really two separate issues: the sharing of raw data and open access to publications.

Sharing of raw data is incredibly valuable for the scientific community. Any group that chooses to publish polished interpretations of their data (such as a paper) must also be responsible for the quality of the raw data and/or analysis that went into it. Because researchers may have unrealized biases in data analysis and interpretation, it is vital that the raw data also be available for examination.

Open access is a thornier issue. While the benefits (greater spread of knowledge, greater inclusion in science, greater connection with the public) are valuable, our current system of publication does not incentivize open access. Treating the scientific publication process as a public good, as academic research is treated, may therefore be a valuable approach to solve this issue of incentives.

Sarah is a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin, She wrote:

I’m….studying retinal development, so my interaction with Open Data is more the general academic experience and thinking about it abstractly. The first part of my response was mostly inspired by my experiences reading papers and the frustration of knowing they’re only the beautified surface of the work that was actually done. The second part of my response was actually inspired by economics podcasts like Planet Money and Freakonomics, which are some of my favorite things to listen to while doing lab work.

She also told us:

Also I just want to take the chance to thank everyone at Mendeley! I really appreciate that you’ve made it more than just a useful application (and it is incredibly useful).

Thank you, Sarah!

Those who didn’t win this time are encouraged to respond to the latest Mendeley Brainstorm, regarding Ageing Societies. Thanks again to all our participants.

Mendeley Brainstorm: Ageing Societies – Getting Wiser?

As society ages, we need to formulate intelligent solutions for the future.

The elderly is one of the fastest growing segments of the world’s population. For example, the number of people in Japan aged over 65 hit a record high in 2016. What changes will we see in technology and society as a result? How do we get wiser about getting older? We are looking for the most well thought out answer to this question in up to 150 words: use the comment feature below the blog and please feel free to promote your research! The winner will receive an Amazon gift certificate worth £50 and a bag full of Mendeley items; competition closes February 8, 2017.

Another Year Older

The New Year brings us closer to an unprecedented milestone. The worldwide number of people aged 60 and over will soon exceed 1 billion; the ratio of working people to pensioners is also experiencing a dramatic shift.

Bonanza or Bankruptcy?

Companies like BMW are adjusting their working practices to accommodate this demographic change. BMW found that such changes help them retain valuable skillsets. On the other hand, countries like Japan are struggling to pay pensions and health care for all their retirees; in fiscal 2012, the cost to the Japanese taxpayer was ¥109 trillion.

Technology to the Rescue?

Will Artificial Intelligence and / or Robotics help? More and more labour is being performed by machines; will this help countries adapt to this change? Or are governments going to have to restrict benefits to the elderly? Will the elderly have to work for longer? What would wise policy in response to this change look like? What are your thoughts on what actually will happen? Tell us!

About Mendeley Brainstorms

Our Brainstorms are challenges so we can engage with you, our users, on the hottest topics in the world of research.  We look for the most in-depth and well thought through responses; the best response as judged by the Mendeley team will earn a prize.

References

THE GUARDIAN, (2016). Are you worried about our ageing population? Share your thoughts. [online] Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/nov/15/are-you-worried-about-our-ageing-population-share-your-thoughts [Accessed 15 Nov. 2016].

HALL, A. (2011). Built by Mature Workers: BMW opens car plant where all employees are aged over 50. Daily Mail. [online] Available at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1357958/BMW-opens-car-plant-employees-aged-50.html [Accessed 15 Nov. 2016].
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JAPAN TIMES, (2015). Public pensions, health care stretched as Japan’s population ages. [online] Available at: http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2015/11/25/national/social-issues/public-pensions-health-care-stretch-japans-population-ages/#.WCr3pdxgst8 [Accessed 15 Nov. 2016].