Mendeley refocusing announcement: mobile app retirement

[Editor’s Note: We’ve updated this 2021 post to include a current link for sharing your input about mobile functionality for Mendeley.]

At Mendeley, we aim to help researchers work even more efficiently so they can spend their time making discoveries. Sometimes this means withdrawing lesser used products from service to allow us to focus on those products that are used by more of the Mendeley Community.

Users of the mobile app were informed on 10 February 2021 that the app would be withdrawn from the App Store and Google Play on 15 March and that they would no longer be able to sign in to the app.

While we understand that some users do indeed value the native Mendeley mobile apps, unfortunately overall usage figures show us that this feature does not support the majority of Mendeley users in the way that we had hoped. In line with our continued aim to support researchers as effectively as we can, discontinuing the mobile app will mean we can focus on the solutions that the majority of our users tell us they value most. This includes making improvements to Mendeley Reference Manager, Mendeley Cite and Mendeley Web Importer.

As Laura Thomson, Senior Director of Product Management explains, “Our team’s mission to develop solutions that most effectively support researchers means that we sometimes have to make some hard decisions about where we can focus our efforts. We’re really excited about our plans for 2021 and look forward to bringing researchers new and improved ways to simplify their workloads.”

In order to continue the use of their Mendeley library, app users are advised to sync their library to the cloud in advance of 15 March, 2021. Users can then access their library on Mendeley Reference Manager web or desktop application.

Offline reading is available for Mendeley Reference Manager web, more information can be found here.


Your experience matters

If you are a regular user of Mendeley on mobile devices, we would be interested to understand more about how you use it via this feedback form. This information will help us to improve the mobile experience on the main applications. While we will be unable to respond individually, your message will be reviewed by our team and suggestions may be incorporated in future releases of Mendeley Reference Manager or Mendeley Cite. Provide feedback.

Advisor of the Month: William Hoyos

What is your name and job title?

William Hoyos, Ph.D. student in engineering

Where do you work/study?

Universidad EAFIT

How did you get into your field?

First, I studied bacteriology, then I studied systems engineering. I realized the application of engineering to medical problems and decided to pursue a PhD in engineering with an emphasis on artificial intelligence in medicine. Currently, I work on artificial intelligence models for dengue prediction and prescription.

Where do you do your best work?

I believe that my best work is in the application of engineering in medical problem solving. Besides, I am very good at sharing my knowledge with others. It gives me satisfaction and allows me to continue learning.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

About 7 years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I was using EndNote.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I love to teach. I like to share my knowledge with others. I am always willing to share new tools that make the research process easier for my co-workers. I am commonly demonstrating new features released by Mendeley.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

I would like to meet Andrew Ng. World pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence. Ng co-founded Coursera and deeplearning.ai.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, by Yuval Noah Harari.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

The application of fuzzy cognitive maps to assess causality in infectious diseases such as dengue.

What is the best part about working in research?

The positive impact your results generate for humanity.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Getting funding for research.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

A wonderful tool for research. A platform with capabilities to link researchers, organize bibliographic references, share knowledge, among other powerful features of Mendeley.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Yes, have passion and love for what they do. I think these are the two fundamental pillars of success in research.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Advisor of the Month: Adilson Rocha Ferreira

What is your name and job title?

My name is Adilson Rocha Ferreira and I am a researcher and teacher.

Where do you work/study?

Currently, I work at the Education Department of the State of Alagoas, in the Northeast of Brazil, a region well known for its beautiful beaches, natural beauty and a warrior and struggling people since its origins. As a PhD student in Education, I study at the Federal University of Alagoas, Postgraduate Program in Education, Education Center.

How did you get into your field?

I entered the Federal University of Alagoas in the Physical Education Degree course in 2009, finishing it in 2013, and since then I have been improving at other levels. In 2016 I concluded the Specialization Course in Media in Education and then the Master in Education. I am currently a PhD student in Education and in the Pedagogy course as well. In 2015, I obtained approval in a contest to provide places for elementary school teachers and since then I have been teaching Physical Education classes for students from 7 to 12 years old in public schools of the State Department of Education of Alagoas.

Where do you do work the best?

I believe that my best job is to develop research on digital technologies applied in the fields of education and health, with an emphasis on conventional digital games, exergames and gamification, in order to think other ways to learn, teach and exercise with the support of these technologies.

How long have you been using Mendeley?

Around the year 2016, at the beginning of the Master of Education course, I found Mendeley and since then I can’t live without it.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Prior to Mendeley, I had never used any other reference manager, I used to manage files in folders and elaborate citations and references manually, based on several manuals. From the experience with Mendeley, I was able to find others, but none of them captivated me as much as Mendeley!

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

Being part of the Mendeley team was what most instigated me to become a Mendeley Advisor, as it is very gratifying to contribute to Elsevier with feedbacks and promote Mendeley demonstrations for different groups in the academic community.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Currently I already work with researchers in whom I always dreamed of working together, such as Deise Juliana Francisco, Neiza de Lourdes Frederico Fumes, Fernando Silvio Cavalcante Pimentel, Lynn Rosalina Gama Alves, Flávio Anderson Pedrosa de Melo and César Augusto Otero Vaghetti. However, going further, I would like to meet and work with James Paul Gee, Humberto Maturana, Francisco Varela and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, who are scholars on which I base my research.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Silver, C., & Lewins, A. (2014). Using software in qualitative research: a step-by-step guide. 55 City Road, London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I am learning to play guitar. So any note or sound that I manage to make at that initial moment seems to me to be incredible achievements.

What is the best part about working in research?

For me, the best part of working as a team is to learn from the different skills that a team brings together, so that by collaborating with my skills I can learn and develop other skills.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

I continue to follow the same line of reasoning: deal with the difference! Respecting the adversary and knowing how far one can go are challenges that must be managed in group work.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

I would like everyone to know, especially those who are starting courses in higher education, that there is no longer a need to create countless folders and get lost in the middle of several files. With Mendeley, you can collect articles and similar items in one place, in the cloud, and carry with you wherever you go with just a Mendeley account.

Do you have any advice for young researchers?

Be organized in your readings by including Mendeley in your workflow. At first it may seem like extra work, but in the future, it will save many hours of your academic readings and writings.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Mendeley refocusing announcement: email delays

At the beginning of November we communicated changes being made to Mendeley to refocus on what’s important to our users. This blog piece was accompanied by social media posts, announcements across our website at Mendeley.com and email communications. Unfortunately, there was a delay to some of the emails being sent to our users, for which we apologize.

We would like to reassure our users, especially those that have only recently seen the announcement, that there is still time to take any desired action ahead of the changes taking place on Mendeley.

The first changes taking place in early December are focused on the retirement of the Newsfeed, Group Feeds, Suggest and Profiles on the Mendeley website:

  • Your profile data is now available for you to export to text or JSON formats in your account settings
  • Public group references and metadata will be available to export in Mendeley Desktop and Mendeley Reference Manager at least until the end January 2021 – find out how to do so here. After this time mechanisms will be in place for our support teams to help with exports
  • Please note: Mendeley Suggest will be continuing as an article recommendation service by email

You can find out more about all changes happening on Mendeley and what this means for you on this page on the Mendeley Support Center, which we’ll be regularly updating.

In sending these product service email communications we learnt that that there are a number of users registered with emails that are no longer in use. We would encourage you to keep your details up to date by changing your email or personal details, or if you are no longer a Mendeley user you can delete your Mendeley account.

How to add your Mendeley Advisor certification to your LinkedIn profile

A LinkedIn profile is popular way to organize and showcase your education and career experience. This is also a great platform to add any licenses or certificates you achieve, like your Mendeley Advisor status.  

In this quick guide, we’ll help you add your Mendeley Advisor certification and badge to your LinkedIn profile.


First things first

Please make sure you have successfully registered as a Mendeley Advisor by visiting our Mendeley Advisor Community page, clicking “Register as an Advisor” and filling out the form.

Get started

  1. Sign into LinkedIn with your existing account, or if you are new to LinkedIn, create a new account for free
  2. Navigate to your profile and scroll down to the Licenses & certifications section
  3. Click the “+” icon to the right to add a new entry

In the new window, enter in your details:

  • Name = Mendeley Advisor
  • Issuing Organization = Mendeley (choose the first Mendeley result with the red logo that auto-populates)
  • Check the box next to “This credential does not expire”
  • Enter in the month and year you achieved your certification (this can be an estimate if you don’t know your exact date)
  • Leave credential ID blank
  • Credential URL = https://www.mendeley.com/advisor-community
  • Click “save”

And you’re all set. Now your Mendeley Advisor certification is proudly displayed on your LinkedIn profile for all to see. Congratulations!

Advisor of the month: Heidi Jørgensen

What is your name and job title?

My name is Heidi Jørgensen and I am a librarian.

Where do you work?

I work at University College Absalon, Campus Næstved, Denmark.

How did you get into your field?

I graduated in 1996 from The Royal School of Librarianship in Denmark. I was immediately offered a job at a public library but learned quickly that it was the academic part that had my interest. I was employed at The Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library in Copenhagen, both as a librarian but also as a consultant for the institutes. However the capital was not for me, I have therefore been working at University College Absalon for the past 18 years where we educate:
Bachelor in Biomedical Laboratory Science
Bachelor in Nursing
Bachelor in Occupational Therapy
Bachelor in Physiotherapy
Bachelor in Public Administration

Where do you do work the best?

When I am able to help students or teachers find scientific literature on exactly what they are looking for. Seeing that what they learn, allows them to move forward with their projects. For me, it is equally important whether they will learn to search databases such as PubMed, Scopus etc. or whether they will just learn to use Mendeley so they can cite their sources correctly.

How long have you been using Mendeley?

For six years and an advisor for five years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I have used RefMan/EndNote.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I became an advisor because this was the best way for me to get to know all about Mendeley and even to come up with new ideas on how to use it.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Tycho Brahe (1546 –1601). He was a Danish nobleman, astronomer, astrologer, alchemist, and writer known for his accurate and comprehensive astronomical observations.
Tycho was also famous for his contributions to medicine; his herbal medicines were in use as late as the 1900s. This is where we have a common interest and it would have been a privilege to learn from him.
We also have an expression in Scandinavia “Tycho Brahe days” which refers to a number of “unlucky days” – I think we all can relate to that.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Klaris, H. W. (2015). Skyggernes bog. Sorø: Tellerup.
(I used drag and drop from Mendeley)
[The Book of Shadows]. Every year I make a Christmas calendar for all the students at Absalon (10.000+) with gifts. It is an online event with quizzes about Christmas, Absalon, but indeed also about the resources that we, as a library, offer the students. Mendeley has been a part of our quiz since I started the tradition. This year we got more than 5.000 copies of this book to use as gifts. I thought I’d better read it.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I bought truffle mycelium and have now learned how to plant it along with the roots of a tree. If it works, I will know in approx. five years but then I should also be able to harvest both black and white truffles. I do not quite trust it, but it was very interesting!

What is the best part about working in research?

The best part for me, as a librarian, is when students realize that they are able to find the latest research within their field of study. It gives me hope that in the future when they work in our Health Care System they will keep doing this and provide the best care for our citizens.

And access! It is impossible to have access to all the resources that the users want. It is a matter of prioritizing which subscriptions you choose to subscribe to. Many are expensive and the funds are unfortunately not enough.

Do you have any advice for young researchers?

Stay updated. Make a search string that fits your subject area and create an alert. This will help you to stay updated.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

We’ve listened to our users and are refocusing on what’s important to them

Concentrating our services on the tools that are providing the most value towards our users’ work – reference management, research data management and citation solutions. What does it mean for the Mendeley Community?

At Mendeley, we aim to help researchers work even more efficiently so they can spend their time making discoveries.

As Head of Reference Management Laura Thomson says:

“We want to take reference management off researchers’ minds by making all the tasks related to collecting, organizing, reading, annotating and citing as simple as possible.”

To ensure we are supporting researchers as effectively as we can, we regularly review what our users show us and tell us they need and value most.

Based on our evolving understanding of our customers’ needs, Mendeley is increasing its focus on its core reference management, research data management and citation tools.

In recent months, we have made many improvements:

  • The new Mendeley Reference Manager now features real-time sync of a user’s document library to the cloud, so that there’s no delay in seeing changes made to their library across all their devices.
  • We built a new citation add-in, Mendeley Cite, as a standalone extension for Microsoft Word so that it can additionally be used in the browser with Office 365 and with Word for iPad without the Mendeley Desktop app.
  • Our refreshed Mendeley Web Importer now leverages Mendeley’s catalog of open access links as well as industry partnerships such as GetFTR to help maximize convenient access to full texts and save researchers even more time in importing them to their libraries.
  • Mendeley Data has expanded coverage to more than 25 million datasets over 2000 data repositories, making researcher data even more findable and citable.

To focus on providing the best possible service and experience for the users of these tools, we will simplify Mendeley and retire the following features from December 2020:

  • Mendeley Feed and Public Groups
  • Mendeley Profiles
  • Mendeley Funding

Our customers can find out more about what this means for them on this page in our Support Center which we’ll be keeping regularly updated.

The new Mendeley Reference Manager is now available and we will continually improve the tool based the feedback of our users. Mendeley Desktop continues to be supported and we remain committed to our Mendeley Institutional Edition customers. Mendeley has always had open public APIs, and we maintain these as part of our commitment to interoperability, which is one of our four core principles, together with source neutrality, transparency and user control.

Mendeley exists because every researcher faces challenges with building their knowledge, being personally organized and efficiently preparing articles for submission. We continue our core mission of dedicated support to researchers in achieving these goals and intend to keep Mendeley available free of charge.

Mendeley has been helping researchers simplify their workflow and accelerate their research for many years now, and we look forward to continuing to do this for many years to come.

– Rose L’Huillier, EVP Researcher Products

Your Mendeley Web Library is changing to the new Mendeley Reference Manager

Get ready for a new and improved reference management experience.

As part of our plans to help researchers manage their references more efficiently, all Mendeley Web Libraries have migrated to the new Mendeley Reference Manager.

Your Web Library has automatically migrated, and you can now access all the features of the new system.

The new Mendeley Reference Manager offers you:

  • A cloud-based library that automatically syncs so your changes are instantly accessible across locations, devices and Mendeley tools such as the desktop app and Mendeley Cite
  • Identical functionality and appearance across Mendeley Reference Manager online and desktop that will allow you to seamlessly switch between the two versionsMRM library 2
  • Offline mode that ensures you can continue working wherever you are, and be confident that changes to your library will auto-sync when you’re back online
  • New features and functionality to help make managing your references even simpler, such as the new Mendeley Notebook which helps you collate all your highlights and notes from multiple PDFs
  • A highly stable platform that will be regularly updated with new and improved features in response to your needs and changes in technology

The desktop version of the new Mendeley Reference Manager is also available to download. Find out more and download it here! Please note, however, that Mendeley Desktop is still available for use should you wish to keep using that version.

We’re thrilled to bring you this new and improved reference management solution. Remember to sign in and check out your library’s new home.

For any questions about this migration and the new Mendeley Reference Manager, visit the Mendeley Support Center.

Advisor of the month: Nick Hood

Nick HoodWhat is your name and job title?

My name is Nick Hood and I am a Senior Teaching Fellow in Secondary Education.

Where do you work?

I work at the Moray House School of Education and Sport at the University of Edinburgh.

How did you get into your field?

I took the long way round. I spent some years in the military and aerospace before starting my own software business. Part of that business involved training others in programming and data manipulation, and that led me to become a physics and mathematics teacher. I moved into teacher education about eight years ago.

Where do you do work the best?

Honestly, I think my best work is in supporting people who find our programmes challenging. Part of my job is as a personal tutor, where I get to work one-to-one with people who struggle with aspects of our very intensive postgraduate courses. Sometimes this is more pastoral, but often it is about getting to grips with academic writing.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

About eight years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Good old manual methods. I just typed what I wanted on the page.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

A friend and colleague was our local Mendeley Advisor and when she hinted that she would retire, I thought I’d step up.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

A scientist who had an idea that saved millions of lives, Robert Watson-Watt. Or, if I am allowed a fictional researcher, Hari Seldon from Asimov’s Foundation series of stories.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Barthes, R. (1980) Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, Hill and Wang.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

How to take photographs in infrared.

What is the best part about working in research?

I like learning how to manipulate and present data for understanding – sometimes that is a matter of drawing a picture.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Getting away from distractions that frustrate understanding of the thing you are trying to make sense of. We all know that moment when we can almost clearly see some complex idea, when we are so close that we can nearly touch it – and the email pings, or a knock at the door collapses it all like a house of cards.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is the smart choice for the complex task of managing your sources when writing for academic or professional purposes.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Get organised early. Establish your workflow. Use tools that get out of the way of your research activities and your data.


Find out more about Nick by following and viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

 

Advisor of the Month: Andi Anto Patak

What is your name and job title?

My name is Andi Anto Patak and I am a senior lecturer at Universitas Negeri Makassar in Indonesia.

How did you enter your field and what is your research focus?

I completed my Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in English Education at Universitas Negeri Makassar, then went on to a Ph.D. in Measurement and Evaluation at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.

The development of extensive literacy and research has interested me for many years. I have published several Mendeley-themed papers in Scopus-indexed journals as well as two books about Mendeley, which both came out in 2012. My first was also the first ever Indonesian-language book about Mendeley (*editor’s note: maybe even the first book about Mendeley!*). It had a print run of 1,000: 300 copies were sold and 700 were distributed free to students and lecturers.

My second book was also in Indonesian and also had a print run of 1,000. With this book, 500 copies were sold and the remaining 500 were distributed free. Digital versions of both books are available online and for free.

Here are links to my books:

Mendeley: Citation & PDF Reference Manager plus Jejaring Sosial by Andi Anto Patak, Erwin Akib – Books on Google Play (published in 2012).

Hindari Plagiat dengan Mendeley by Andi Anto Patak, Erwin Akib – Books on Google Play (Published in 2015)

I hope that everyone who has a passion for writing can have easy access to Mendeley. My current research is focused on developing a Mendeley-based thesis submission model that helps to avoid plagiarism.

What is your history with Mendeley?

I have used Mendeley for more than eight years. In the first year of my PhD, I used EndNote. For a short while after I discovered Mendeley, I used the two solutions together. Then I found that reference management was simpler with Mendeley — it was more user friendly for writing dissertations and papers too. So I switched full time to Mendeley.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

Because I find Mendeley easy to use, I decided to become a Mendeley Advisor. I’m able to invite fellow international students in Malaysia and my colleagues in Indonesia to jointly use Mendeley for writing dissertations, articles, research papers and other publications.

What academics, researchers or librarians would you like to work with or meet?

Professor Wendy Sutherland Smith of Deakin University, Australia, who pioneered research on plagiarism.

What is the best part of working in research?

The best part of being a researcher is finding the gaps in knowledge where we can research. Also, I like when we can find the full text of all the relevant references for a research project!

And the most challenging part?

The most challenging part is trying to work with participants who do not honestly respond to data collection.

What is one thing that you want people to know about Mendeley?

I created a Facebook group to let people know about Mendeley events in Indonesia and get feedback from Indonesian Mendeley users. You can find it here: Indonesian Mendeley Community.

Find out more about Andi by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.