What were the most popular papers of 2019?

Mendeley 2019 Papers Image“Best of the year” lists always catch our eye. They’re a great way to check if we missed any important movies, books or news. They also show us what our peers focused on and suggest trends for the coming year.

In that spirit, we’ve compiled this list of the most popular papers of 2019. These open access articles were trending in the Mendeley Catalog in 2019, meaning that they had the largest growth in readership over the course of the year.

There’s one paper across eight major disciplines of science: computer science; education; physics and astronomy; environmental science; medicine; neuroscience; chemistry; and material science. It’s fascinating to see the range of topics of interest across these disciplines, including artificial intelligence, conservation, memory and process improvement.

The Mendeley Catalog is an ever-growing resource that currently contains over 300 million research papers. You can search the entire Catalog using the search tool that appears in the main toolbar in your Mendeley.com interface. You can also get personalized recommendations of new papers to read from Mendeley Suggest by creating a Mendeley account.

Computer Science

Methods for interpreting and understanding deep neural networks
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/methods-interpreting-understanding-deep-neural-networks/

Abstract extract:
“This paper provides an entry point to the problem of interpreting a deep neural network model and explaining its predictions […] The set of methods covered here is not exhaustive, but sufficiently representative to discuss a number of questions in interpretability, technical challenges, and possible applications.”

Computer Science Figure
Fig. 8. Simple Taylor decomposition applied to a convolutional DNN trained on MNIST, and resulting explanations. Red and blue colors indicate positive and negative relevance scores.

 

Education

The Use of Cronbach’s Alpha When Developing and Reporting Research Instruments in Science Education
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/cronbachs-alpha-developing-reporting-research-instruments-science-education/

Abstract extract:
“Cronbach’s alpha is a statistic commonly quoted by authors to demonstrate that tests and scales that have been constructed or adopted for research projects are fit for purpose […] This article explores how this statistic is used in reporting science education research and what it represents.”

Physics and Astronomy

Theory of dynamic critical phenomena
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/theory-dynamic-critical-phenomena/

Abstract extract:
“When a system is brought to a critical phase transition, such as the gas-liquid critical point where the density difference between liquid and gas disappears, or the Curie point of a ferromagnet where the spontaneous magnetization disappears, many of its properties exhibit singular behavior.”

Environmental Science

Human–Wildlife Conflict and Coexistence
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/humanwildlife-conflict-coexistence/

Abstract extract:
“Recent advances in our understanding of conflict have led to a growing number of positive conservation and coexistence outcomes. I summarize and synthesize factors that contribute to conflict, approaches that mitigate conflict and encourage coexistence, and emerging trends and debates.”

Medicine

Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980: A pooled analysis of 751 population-based studies with 4.4 million participants
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/worldwide-trends-diabetes-since-1980-pooled-analysis-751-populationbased-studies-44-million-particip/

Abstract extract:
“One of the global targets for non-communicable diseases is to halt, by 2025, the rise in the age standardised adult prevalence of diabetes at its 2010 levels. We aimed to estimate worldwide trends in diabetes, how likely it is for countries to achieve the global target, and how changes in prevalence, together with population growth and ageing, are affecting the number of adults with diabetes.”

Medicine Figure
Figure 7.

 

Neuroscience

Competition between engrams influences fear memory formation and recall
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/competition-between-engrams-influences-fear-memory-formation-recall/

Abstract extract:
“Collections of cells called engrams are thought to represent memories. Although there has been progress in identifying and manipulating single engrams, little is known about how multiple engrams interact to influence memory. In lateral amygdala (LA), neurons with increased excitability during training outcompete their neighbors for allocation to an engram. We examined whether competition based on neuronal excitability also governs the interaction between engrams.”

Chemistry

The state of understanding of the lithium-ion-battery graphite solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and its relationship to formation cycling
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/state-understanding-lithiumionbattery-graphite-solid-electrolyte-interphase-sei-relationship-formati/

Abstract extract:
“An in-depth historical and current review is presented on the science of lithium-ion battery (LIB) solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation on the graphite anode, including structure, morphology, composition, electrochemistry, and formation mechanism.”

Chemistry figure
Fig. 1. Energetics of the formation of the anode and cathode SEI layers under electroreduction and electro-oxidation conditions [21]. “Reprinted (adapted) with permission from (Goodenough, J. B.; Kim, Y. Chemistry of Materials 2010, 22, 587). Copyright (2010) American Chemical Society.”

Material Science

Surface texture metrology for metal additive manufacturing: a review
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/surface-texture-metrology-metal-additive-manufacturing-review/

Abstract extract:
“A comprehensive analysis of literature pertaining to surface texture metrology for metal additive manufacturing has been performed. This review paper structures the results of this analysis into sections that address specific areas of interest: industrial domain; additive manufacturing processes and materials; types of surface investigated; surface measurement technology and surface texture characterisation.”

Material Science figure
Fig. 4. A typical truncheon artefact [49].Enter a caption

Find more papers of interest by searching the Mendeley Catalog at Mendeley.com.

Register with or sign in to Mendeley to get personalized recommendations for papers from Mendeley Suggest.

Join the Mendeley Advisors

Mendeley Advisor Community logo_ColorIn 2019, we welcomed tens of thousands of new users to Mendeley and the magic of good reference management. When it comes to discovering the platform, one of the best ways is through our brilliant Mendeley Advisor Community, which goes beyond recommendation to support users worldwide.

We are actively recruiting new Advisors for 2020. Could you be the next great Mendeley Advisor?

The Mendeley Advisor Community includes people from all over the world. Most Advisors are PhD students and early-career lecturers, but the community also includes librarians, tenured professors, government lab employees and corporate researchers.

Mendeley Advisors are the voice of Mendeley on campus, helping their peers use its great features to save time and reduce stress levels. They share their knowledge of Mendeley in classes, office hours and fun events on campus!

In 2019, the Advisors spread their love of Mendeley in all sorts of ways, including:

Besides the satisfaction that comes from helping your peers, Advisors receive a whole range of benefits, such as:

  • Increased free library storage
  • A coveted Mendeley T-shirt
  • Giveaways for your workshops
  • Invitations for speaking opportunities and to be profiled on Elsevier blogs
  • Sneak previews of new Mendeley products and features
  • A certificate to acknowledge your contribution to the community
  • Support, advice and collateral from the Mendeley Community team
  • Invitations to do UX and BETA testing, so you can be part of Mendeley’s development

It’s so easy to apply to be a Mendeley Advisor: just click here.

We’re looking forward to welcoming you to the Community.

Advisor of the Month: Felix Oke

Felix Oke: Anchor University, Lagos, Nigeria 

How did you get into your field and what is your research story?

I undertake research in linguistics with a focus on media studies. Recently, I have got a deep insight into an emerging field called digital humanities.

My research career began while I was working on my final year project as an undergrad. I enjoyed the affordances there are in carrying out field work in linguistics. Next, I engaged with a robust and more detailed research project in medical linguistics. Recently, my research activities have revolved around media discourse and digital humanities with special interest in digitising images of cultural heritage in Nigeria.

Where do you do your research? What kind of environment suits you?

As a faculty staff member, I make use of my office in Lagos, Nigeria and sometimes in the library. I enjoy the serenity of my workplace. In a few occasions, I take a research retreat.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I started using Mendeley in 2016.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Due to my passion for referencing, I engaged in the manual way of documenting sources judiciously. Since the time I came across Mendeley, my research experience has changed tremendously.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor and how are you involved with the program?

I was surprised by the wonders of Mendeley, so I decided to learn and master the software. Also, I have passion in reaching out to researchers who don’t have the knowledge of any reference manager in my country.

I love referencing generally. I was part of a team of developers put together to work on the style sheet for referencing online data. I have taught that aspect of referencing with graduate students as part of their requirements for a course in methodology. I have also taught Mendeley in our Summer School on Digital Humanities, to the ICT staff of University and to other faculty and doctoral researchers.

Which researcher would you most like to work with, dead or alive?

The researcher I would like to work with is James Cummings, Newcastle, UK. He is a digital humanist who specialises in coding, mining and visualising humanities data.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Currently, I am reading Goals by Brian Tracy. I would like to learn more about attaining to one’s life goals.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve done this week?

Teaching referencing to graduate students of the University of Lagos, Akoka, Nigeria, who have no prior knowledge of a reference manager like Mendeley.

What is the best part about working in research?

What I enjoy the most in research is the aspect of data interpretation or discussion.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

The most challenging part of research is data gathering.

What is one Mendeley “ProTip” you have?

I have discovered, over the years in Mendeley, the intricacy of what is called the “metadata”.

Biography

I am a doctoral candidate from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria and a lecturer in the Department of Languages and Linguistics from Anchor University, Lagos, Nigeria. My research interest borders on the intersection between language studies and digital software.

In my ongoing doctoral thesis titled “Construction of Identity and Ideology in Nigerian News Reports on Boko Haram Insurgency”, I have been able to show the trajectory of news discourse, critical discourse analysis and multimodal digital humanities in terrorism discourse. Recently, I have undertaken a research project on digitisation of cultural heritage in Nigeria.

Editor’s Note: Felix is too modest to say it here, but he has been working with his university to set up a Mendeley learning lab! We think this is pretty cool.

Find out more about Felix by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here

Explore mindfulness to improve your research–life balance

The human mind can be trained to cope with and relieve stress. This training is called mindfulness. By increasing awareness of thoughts and emotions in a given moment, it helps to avoid getting carried away. Mindfulness is proven to improve mental and even physical health – and now Elsevier’s Researcher Academy is bringing mindfulness to researchers in a brand-new module.

See the new Mindfulness module

Elsevier-ResearchersAcademy-August2019-1_10-v2C

Why is mindfulness important to researchers? The work of a researcher can feel overwhelming. The pressures associated with funding, competition and deadlines can affect a researcher’s wellbeing and peace of mind. In turn, this can mean a poorer work–life balance, reduced work efficiency and burnout. Mindfulness can help researchers take charge over their own lives.

The new Researcher Academy module will explore the practice of mindfulness in coping with stress as well as improving mental health and overall wellbeing. It will include an exploration of the scientific background of the practice and step-by-step guide to mindfulness in daily research routines.

The Mindfulness module will go live on 14 November at 11:00 a.m. (UTC). Register today!

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Get more career guidance from Elsevier’s Research Academy here

Find out how to unlock your research potential with Elsevier’s Researcher Academy here

We hit another Advisor milestone!

Once a month, we like to comb through the Mendeley Advisor statistics to see if there’s anything we can learn about how we can make the program even better. (We also like to see if we’ve hit another milestone that we should celebrate with cake.)

And right now, the biggest milestone is the number of new Advisors in 2019!  We are pleased to say we have welcomed 1,045 new Mendeley Advisors to the community in 2019.

We’re also happy to see we have a good split of Advisors across the globe, with new Advisors based in 104 countries ranging from the Caribbean island of Saint Lucia to The Netherlands to Japan!

This chart shows the top 10 countries in terms of where new 2019 Advisors are based.

As always, we want to thank the Mendeley Advisors for sharing their love of Mendeley, and helping make reference management just a little easier!

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here

 

Advisor of the month: Merceline Obwaya

 

Merceline is a Library Assistant at the Kenyatta University Post Modern Library. Merceline grew up in a small village called Nyansara in Kisii County, Kenya. She earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Library and Information Science from Kenyatta University in December, 2014. She is passionate about providing timely and quality services to the community she serves.

 

How did you get into your field?
I love reading, but that’s not the reason I became a librarian. I love connecting people with the information they need to change their lives for the better. I love the hunt and the power of having the right information at the right time and teaching others to gain the skills too. I chose to pursue a degree in Library and information Science to accomplish all these through serving library/ information centres’ clients. I joined Kenyatta University Post Modern Library a few months after graduating and it has been exciting serving the University Community. It is amazing to work in a library!

Where do you do work the best?
In a relaxed and clean environment with people who are committed to their work and are self-driven.

How long have you used Mendeley?
I was first introduced to Mendeley in 2015 by my supervisor, who is currently the Deputy University librarian at Kenyatta University. Thanks Mr. Thuku!

What were you using prior to Mendeley and how does Mendeley influence your research?
Microsoft Word citations & bibliography. Mendeley is a one-stop solution when it comes to research. It makes referencing and citation so easier, allows one to read the saved PDF documents, make notes and add comments and even search the web catalog for more related reference documents and suggests more articles for further reading. It is an amazing tool.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor, and how are you involved with the program?
When I joined Kenyatta University, I realized most of the users I served had issues with citation and referencing. I took the challenge to learn more about Mendeley, so that I can help them rather than giving them several referrals to the reference experts. I joined the Librarian certification program in 2017 and I learnt and sharpened my skills in using Mendeley. I am involved in the library Information Literacy training sessions and one of the key issues addressed in the trainings is use of the reference management tools. I am the Mendeley expert in my library! I train the students and staff how Mendeley can make their research more enjoyable and easier.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?
No one in particular, but I wish to meet the Mendeley team. They have done so much to make referencing such an easier task, providing all the support and resources needed by the users to learn more about Mendeley. The people behind this magic.

What book are you reading at the moment?
In addition to the many articles I read while working, I am currently reading “Doors of opportunity: issues in personal development and achievement” by Sebuye Livingstone.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?
Learning is a continuous process. There is always something new to learn each day.

What is the best part about working in research?
Always learning to solve problems scholars face to make their research life better and interesting.

And the most challenging part about working in research?
When people assume that as an information professional you know everything, and that you can solve all the challenges they face in the research world.

What is one Mendeley “ProTip” you have?
All the Mendeley features are just where I exactly need them. The new Mendeley web importer is an amazing development! I can now save the subscribed articles without going through the long process of downloading them to my desktop folders first.

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Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here

Advisor of the month: Virginia Ballance

Virginia BallanceVirginia Ballance is the Nursing and Health Sciences Librarian at the University of The Bahamas. She works in the Hilda Bowen Library at the nursing school campus in downtown Nassau Bahamas.

How did you get into your field?
I loved studying and working in the library while I was at university and after graduate school studies sort of moved seamlessly into librarianship.

Where do you do work best?
In the library.

How long have you been using Mendeley?
I set up an account several years ago mostly to try it out. Last year the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research suggested I offer a workshop on reference management – we selected Mendeley because of the great features.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?
Years ago I used EndNote but in recent years, embarrassed to say, I wasn’t using anything…

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?
The Mendeley Advisor programme encouraged me to really learn to use the product and exploit all its features as well as providing me with the training materials (presentations that could be customized, posters and certificates) needed to run a workshop. Being an Advisor puts you in contact with a fabulous group of Mendeley users all over the world to share experiences using Mendeley. There are other great benefits such as having a larger account size and greater number of Mendeley groups.

Which researcher would you most like to work with, dead or alive?
Hard question – to be honest, I really enjoy working with the students and faculty here at the University of The Bahamas.

What book are you reading at the moment?
Homo Deus by Yuval Noah Harari and about 10 other books…

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?
I discovered Google Crisis Maps. This is a special project which gives access to satellite images and maps specifically for emergency situations. I was amazed to see details of the extent of the devastation on the two islands in the Bahamas that were hit by Hurricane Dorian on September 1, 2019. https://www.google.org/crisismap/weather_and_events

What’s the best part about working in research?
Seeing your name in print! Getting cited!

And the most challenging part about working in research?
Procrastination. Making time in the day or the week to work on writing especially when there are so many distractions.

What’s the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?
It can make your scholarly writing so much easier…

Do you have any advice for young researchers?
Absolutely – be brave, go to conferences, present your ideas, network, work with your colleagues, and let the librarians in your institution know what you are working on.

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Watch Virginia give advice on the best methods and tools to effectively collect, organize and retrieve a personal knowledge base as part of Elsevier’s recent Build My Knowledge webinar

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here