2017 Reaxys PhD Prize

Open for Submissions: the 2017 Reaxys PhD Prize

Today marks an important day in the chemistry calendar: the launch of the 2017 Reaxys PhD Prize! From now until March 13, talented and ambitious chemistry PhD students from all around the world will be sending their submissions, all hoping to show the Review Board that they deserve a place on the list of finalists.

It’s considered a high honor to be a Reaxys PhD Prize finalist. Each entry is judged in terms of originality, innovation, importance and applicability of the research. The reviewers also look at the rigor of approach and methodology and the quality and clarity of related publications. Recommendation letters and CVs are also considered. Hundreds of applications come in each year, with students from over 400 institutions having participated to date, and the Review Board have consistently praised the quality of the submissions.

It is the Review Board’s task to select the 45 finalists, who are invited to present their research at the Reaxys PhD Prize Symposium. This year’s event will be held in Shanghai in October, with travel bursaries and accommodations provided to ensure that the finalists can attend. The 2016 symposium was in London—you can see the highlights in this short video:

In addition to gaining recognition for their research excellence and an opportunity to present their work, all the finalists are invited to join the Reaxys Prize Club, a unique, international network of chemists from all researchers and career paths. Now with over 300 members, the Club has proven to boost the careers of young chemists, helping them to meet with other chemists, attend conferences, and organize events. Prize Club members also receive personal access to Reaxys and Reaxys Medicinal Chemistry and discounts on Elsevier books.

Being a finalist is an accolade in itself, but the participants all certainly hope to be selected as one of the three winners. The shortlisted best finalists make a final oral presentation of their research at the Reaxys PhD Prize Symposium, based on which, the Review Board Chairs select the winners. Each winner receives a prize of $2000 in addition to all the benefits that finalists get.

The competition is open to anyone who has just finished or is currently engaged in a PhD program where the research focus is related to chemistry. Previous finalists have hailed from institutions in Asia, the Americas, Europe and the Middle East—and they are all members of the Reaxys Prize Club, meaning it is a global network of dedicated and talented chemists.

Could you or someone you know be one of this year’s finalists? All the details about applying can be found here.

Planned Downtime on 11 & 12 January 2017

Please be aware that due to essential maintenance work, on Wednesday, January 11th and Thursday, January 12th, 2017, some users may not be able to access Mendeley services between:

0600 and 0800 GMT

(Please check the World Clock Time Zone Converter to convert the time to your local time.)

During this time, users will be unable to sync Mendeley Desktop or their mobile apps, and all parts of the live site (feed, online library, stats, etc) will be unavailable. If the users are already logged into Mendeley Desktop before the downtime begins, they will continue to be able to use it offline.

Check our Support Twitter account @MendeleySupport for updates.

We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause.

The Mendeley Team

Mendeley Brainstorm – Hacking – We Have a Winner!

As our world is ever more networked, so too is it ever more vulnerable
As our world is ever more networked, so too is it ever more vulnerable

Many thanks to all those who entered the Mendeley Brainstorm related to Hacking; picking a winner given the well thought out answers was not easy, however in the end, we selected Dr. Frances Buontempo’s post.

Dr Frances Buontempo is a post-doc at City, University of London in the Centre for Software Reliability, http://www.city.ac.uk/centre-for-software-reliability working as a consortium on a H2020 project using diversity enhancements for security information and event management : http://disiem.lasige.di.fc.ul.pt/ She wrote:

We are increasingly see IoT devices (including toothbrushes?!) which a little investigation reveals is just using the default user name and password. Many problems are announced on https://cve.mitre.org/ and people reporting vulnerabilities they observe is vital. You then need a way to automatically monitor your machines; not everyone will have a home network set up to keep an eye on their fridge or kettle or toothbrush. I found the recent “nematode” (anti-worm worm) amusing; http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/10/31/this_antiworm_patch_bot_could_silence_epic_mirai_ddos_attack_army/ though it suggests a way to use offense as defence. A combination of proactively looking for problems, being aware of sensible measures like not using default or crack-able passwords, and also being more pro-active will help. In the long run, whatever you do to secure machines will be insufficient; in some ways it’s an arms race between sides. The trick is to catch problems early before any damage is done.

A sound prognosis. She also told us:

I am using Mendeley for my research, and have previously used it for a few personal projects. It’s a really easy tool to use, and visually much nicer than some other tools I’ve previously used.

Thank you, Frances!

Those who didn’t win this time are encouraged to respond to the latest Mendeley Brainstorm, regarding Open Data. Thanks again to all our participants.

Stats is becoming part of your Mendeley profile

stats

Stats is changing from being a private dashboard (only you can see) to being a part of your profile so that, as well as showcasing your work, your profile also shows the exposure and impact your work is having.

The features currently shown on the stats overview page will be shown in a tab in the profile: aggregated publication metrics (h-index, views, citations, readers), aggregated view and citation timeline and media mentions.

Your profile will show a single list of all your publications, where:
• you control which publications are showcased to viewers of your profile;
• we show you (and only you) a detailed view of the impact each of your publications is having individually.

Just like now, you control who sees your profile, and this will include your new stats tab. Your profile is public by default, with an option to make visible to only your followers, and an additional option to restrict your followers to only those you give permission to.

Mendeley integrates with ORCID — uniquely identify your research

ORCID ID

Searching for research is now easier than ever — but how do you know whose research you’re reading? Is the piece by John A. Smith, the Harvard researcher, or by John A. Smith, the internet blogger?

Mendeley is integrating with ORCID, the Open Research Contributor ID non-profit, to bring your unique research identification to your Mendeley profile.

Since it’s launch in 2012, ORCID has issued over 2.5 million unique identifiers to help researchers keep the record straight on what work is whose.

The integration is already live — you can create or connect your ORCID ID with your Mendeley profile today!

Verified integration

ORCID AuhorisationYou’ll can link your existing ORCID account or create a new one, and you’ll have a choice whether to import your ORCID profile information into your Mendeley profile.

Future plans

For now, that’s a one-off import, but we are working with ORCID on how to keep your profiles in sync, so you don’t have to keep filling the same information in again and again.

 

 

Mendeley Data is FAIR2

The FAIR side of Mendeley Data

Mendeley Data is FAIRMendeley hosts a Hack Day aimed at making Mendeley Datasets accessible by FAIR

Earlier this year we launched Mendeley Data, an open data repository where researchers from all disciplines can deposit their datasets. Because we want to support all fields of science, we allow all file formats, and are flexible in the kinds of metadata researchers have to provide. However, we still want to ensure that it is easy for others to find the data, access the data, and work with the data.

That’s where FAIR comes in. FAIR stands for Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable and is an approach for data developed since January 2014 by a wide range of scientific and research data organisations including the Dutch Techcentre for Life Sciences (DTL), and which Elsevier and Mendeley and others support strongly.

In the FAIR Data approach, data should be:

  • Easy to find by both humans and computer systems, with metadata that allow the discovery of interesting datasets;
  • Stored for long term such that they can be easily accessed and/or downloaded with well-defined license and access conditions, whether at the level of metadata, or at the level of the actual data content;
  • Ready to be combined with other datasets by humans as well as computer systems;
  • Ready to be used for future research and to be processed further using computational methods.

Community organizations and funding agencies are starting to recognize the importance of data being FAIR; for example the European Commission is providing researchers that receive funding through Horizon2020 with FAIR data management guidelines.

Mendeley Data wants to support researchers making their data available in a FAIR manner and so we’re delighted to be able to collaborate with the DTL, who are developing FAIR tools.

Mendeley Data is FAIR2

Hacking the data

Last Friday developers from DTL joined the Mendeley Data developers for a Mendeley hack day. The goal for the hack day was to extend Mendeley Data API, to be able to expose the FAIR metadata, which allows researchers to discover datasets in Mendeley Data based on detailed metadata attributes.

The end goal is that a researcher using a FAIR-enabled tool can carry out a detailed search operation (for example search for datasets about a particular disease condition) and find relevant results from a range of repositories, including Mendeley Data.

In order to enable this, ultimately, we need to create an endpoint which exposes detailed metadata for our datasets. We knew this would be a tall order for our hack day, so we created a proof-of-concept endpoint which exposed this metadata for some static/hardcoded instances of collections and datasets.

This was enough to show the FAIR Data Point in action, starting off accessing Mendeley Data, and then drilling down into these example catalogues and from there finding the example datasets.

By the end of the hack day we had:

  • Mapped our datasets’ metadata to the FAIR metadata layers of the FAIR Data Point, including W3C’s DCAT spec;
  • Implemented the proof-of-concept FAIR Data Point-compatible endpoint providing metadata which can be consumed by FAIR-enabled tools;
  • Demoed the Mendeley Data FAIR Data Point in action, navigating through the layers of FAIR metadata including the data repository (Mendeley Data), catalogue, datasets and data files.

The outcomes of the hack day were: a much better understanding of how to make our datasets available as FAIR resources, so they can be found, integrated and reused by researchers along with other FAIR datasets; and creation of an endpoint which is only a few steps away from being productionised and available to use by the community.

We really enjoyed working closely with Luiz, DTL’s CTO, and developers Rajaram and Kees to concretely and tangibly make progress towards making Mendeley Data datasets more findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable!

Follow Mendeley Twitter to hear when we launch this capability!

Mendeley Brainstorm: Open Data – The Wave of the Future?

Is the future of data more open?
Is the future of data more open?

“Pirate Politics” are on the march. The Pirate Party of Iceland tripled their representation in the October election. Many organisations, including the Mozilla Foundation, are clamouring for copyright reform to allow more data sharing. Is Open Data the wave of the future? What are the downsides? We are looking for the most well thought out answer to this question in up to 150 words: use the comment feature below the blog and please feel free to promote your research! The winner will receive an Amazon gift certificate worth £50 and a bag full of Mendeley items; competition closes January 11, 2017.

Pirates on the March

The Pirate Party of Iceland tripled their representation on October 29. Part of their appeal in a country as technology literate as Iceland may be their emphasis on open data and reform of copyright laws to allow the free sharing of information.

A Rebellion?

The Pirates’ success may be part of a wider reaction to the increasing restrictions afforded by copyright. For example, the tractor manufacturer John Deere recently argued in court that its ownership of the software in its vehicles extended beyond the point of their products’ sale. The Mozilla Foundation has also set up a campaign whose aim is to make copyright less stringent.

What Next?

As cultural guru Stewart Brand said, “On the one hand…information wants to be expensive, because it’s so valuable…on the other hand, information wants to be free because the cost of getting it out is getting lower and lower all the time.” Is the future of data open? What are the positives and negatives of a more open paradigm? Tell us!

About Mendeley Brainstorms

Our Brainstorms are challenges so we can engage with you, our users, on the hottest topics in the world of research.  We look for the most in-depth and well thought through responses; the best response as judged by the Mendeley team will earn a prize.

References

COYLE, D. (2016). How the digital age cuts through notions of material ownership. The Financial Times. [online] Available at: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/d24bd5dc-83c8-11e6-a29c-6e7d9515ad15.html?siteedition=uk#axzz4M10uYtFG [Accessed 3 Oct. 2016].

DE FREYTAS-TAMURA, K. (2016). Iceland’s Prime Minister Resigns, After Pirate Party Makes Strong Gains. New York Times. [online] Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/31/world/europe/icelands-prime-minister-resigns-after-pirate-party-makes-strong-gains.html?_r=0 [Accessed 2 Nov. 2016].

TURNER, Fred (2006). From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.