Top 5 Trending Agricultural and Biological Sciences Papers in January 2019

Field of wheat

Top 5 Trending Agricultural and Biological Sciences Papers in January 2019

During January we analysed millions of open access academic papers in Agricultural and Biological Sciences to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the Agricultural and Biological Sciences discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.


A) Identification of ADAR1 adenosine deaminase dependency in a subset of cancer cells (20 Readers)

identification of ADAR1

Systematic exploration of cancer cell vulnerabilities can inform the development of novel cancer therapeutics. Here, through analysis of genome-scale loss-of-function datasets, we identify adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR or ADAR1) as an essential gene for the survival of a subset of cancer cell lines. ADAR1-dependent cell lines display increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes. Activation of type I interferon signaling in the context of ADAR1 deficiency can induce cell lethalit…

Hugh S. Gannon et al. in Nature Communications (2018)

B) Methylation-based enrichment facilitates low-cost, noninvasive genomic scale sequencing of populations from feces (337 Readers)

Methylation-based enrichment

Obtaining high-quality samples from wild animals is a major obstacle for genomic studies of many taxa, particularly at the population level, as collection methods for such samples are typically invasive. DNA from feces is easy to obtain noninvasively, but is dominated by bacterial and other non-host DNA. The high proportion of non-host DNA drastically reduces the efficiency of high-throughput sequencing for host animal genomics. To address this issue, we developed an inexpensive capture method f…

Kenneth L. Chiou et al. in Scientific Reports (2018)

C) Soil quality – A critical review (599 Readers)

soil quality graph

Sampling and analysis or visual examination of soil to assess its status and use potential is widely practiced from plot to national scales. However, the choice of relevant soil attributes and interpretation of measurements are not straightforward, because of the complexity and site-specificity of soils, legacy effects of previous land use, and trade-offs between ecosystem services. Here we review soil quality and related concepts, in terms of definition, assessment approaches, and indicator sel…

Else K. Bünemann et al. in Soil Biology and Biochemistry (2018)

D) Conserved fungal effector suppresses PAMP-triggered immunity by targeting plant immune kinases (12 Readers)

conserved fungal

Plant pathogens have optimized their own effector sets to adapt to their hosts. However, certain effectors, regarded as core effectors, are conserved among various pathogens, and may therefore play an important and common role in pathogen virulence. We report here that the widely distributed fungal effector NIS1 targets host immune components that transmit signaling from pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in plants. NIS1 from two Colletotrichum spp. suppressed the hypersen…

Hiroki Irieda et al. in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018)

E) Plant hormone-mediated regulation of stress responses (376 Readers)

Plant hormone-mediated regulation of stress

Background: Being sessile organisms, plants are often exposed to a wide array of abiotic and biotic stresses. Abiotic stress conditions include drought, heat, cold and salinity, whereas biotic stress arises mainly from bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes and insects. To adapt to such adverse situations, plants have evolved well-developed mechanisms that help to perceive the stress signal and enable optimal growth response. Phytohormones play critical roles in helping the plants to adapt to adver…

Vivek Verma et al. in BMC Plant Biology (2016)


That’s it for open access Agricultural and Biological Sciences papers this month. If you enjoyed this post, please let us know with a like or share.

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

 

Top 5 Trending Business, management and accounting Papers in January 2019

Busy street with a lot of people

Top 5 Trending Business, Management and Accounting Papers in January 2019

During January we analysed millions of open access academic papers in Business, Management and Accounting to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the Business, Management and Accounting discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.


A) Entrepreneurial self-efficacy: A systematic review of the literature on its antecedents and outcomes, and an agenda for future research (72 Readers)

Woman with laptop

With increased emphasis being placed on entrepreneurial thinking and acting in today’s careers, we have witnessed growing research on entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) over the last two decades. The present study provides a systematic review of the literature on the theoretical foundations, measurement, antecedents, and outcomes of ESE, and work which treats ESE as a moderator. Based on the review, an agenda for future research is developed and implications for entrepreneurship education and t…

Alexander Newman et al. in Journal of Vocational Behavior (2018)

B) Possibilities and Barriers for Using Electric-powered Vehicles in City Logistics Practice (104 Readers)

gasoline compartment of a car

This paper discusses the current developments, as well as the barriers and opportunities for using electric freight vehicles in daily city logistics operations based on the experiences from a number of running demonstrations. This paper discusses results from other studies and demonstrations that were published on electro mobility in city logistics in the last three years, as an update of an earlier state of the art review. Next, we present recent narratives based on the more than 100 electric f…

Hans Quak et al. in Transportation Research Procedia (2016)

C) Studying the links between organizational culture, innovation, and performance in Spanish companies (395 Readers)

graph showing the links between organizational culture, innovation and performance in Spanish companies

Innovation is considered to be one of the key factors that influence the long-term success of a company in the competitive markets of today. As a result, there is a growing interest in the further study of the determining factors of innovation. Today, the focus is on these factors related to people and behavior, emphasizing the role of organizational culture, as a factor that can both stimulate or restrain innovation, and therefore affect company performance. However, there is little empirical r…

Julia C. Naranjo-Valencia et al. in Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia (2016)

D) An Industry 4.0 Research Agenda for Sustainable Business Models (281 Readers)

mechanic fixing a car

In the Industry 4.0 world that is digitalizing and automating, sustainable business models exist but have not become mainstream. Opportunities for sustainable offerings exist by designing products for longevity, repair and recycling, such that sustainability is not only focusing on being more efficient, but also on using less raw materials and recycling more products. This changes the value proposition, supply chain, relation with the customer and financial justification of a business model. Thi…

Johannes Cornelis De Man et al. in Procedia CIRP (2017)

E) E-commerce Logistics in Supply Chain Management: Practice Perspective (229 Readers)

train rails and train running

E-commerce is booming with the development of new business model and will be continuously boosted in the several decades. With large number of enterprises carrying out E-commerce, logistics driven under the background has been largely influenced. This paper presents the state-of-the-art E-commerce logistics in supply chain management from a view of practice perspective. Worldwide implementations and corresponding models together with supporting techniques are reviewed in this paper. Typical E-co…

Ying Yu et al. in Procedia CIRP (2016)


That’s it for open access Business, Management and Accounting papers this month. If you enjoyed this post, please let us know with a like or share.

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

 

Top 5 Trending Computer Science Papers in January 2019

island with a beach

Top 5 Trending Computer Science Papers in January 2019

During January we analysed millions of open access academic papers in Computer Science to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the Computer Science discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.


A) A survey on sentiment analysis challenges (230 Readers)

graph of sentiment analysis

With accelerated evolution of the internet as websites, social networks, blogs, online portals, reviews, opinions, recommendations, ratings, and feedback are generated by writers. This writer generated sentiment content can be about books, people, hotels, products, research, events, etc. These sentiments become very beneficial for businesses, governments, and individuals. While this content is meant to be useful, a bulk of this writer generated content require using the text mining techniques an…

Doaa Mohey El Din Mohamed Hussein et al. in Journal of King Saud University – Engineering Sciences (2018)

B) Opportunities and challenges in developing deep learning models using electronic health records data: A systematic review (162 Readers)

Infographics of the opportunities and challenges in developing deep learning models using electronic health data

OBJECTIVE Electronic health records (EHRs) are an increasingly common data source for clinical risk prediction, presenting both unique analytic opportunities and challenges. We sought to evaluate the current state of EHR based risk prediction modeling through a systematic review of clinical prediction studies using EHR data. METHODS We searched PubMed for articles that reported on the use of an EHR to develop a risk prediction model from 2009 to 2014. Articles were extracted by two reviewers, an…

Cao Xiao et al. in Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (2018)

C) Big Data in Smart Farming – A review (971 Readers)

Smart Farming is a development that emphasizes the use of information and communication technology in the cyber-physical farm management cycle. New technologies such as the Internet of Things and Cloud Computing are expected to leverage this development and introduce more robots and artificial intelligence in farming. This is encompassed by the phenomenon of Big Data, massive volumes of data with a wide variety that can be captured, analysed and used for decision-making. This review aims to gain…

Sjaak Wolfert et al. in Agricultural Systems (2017)

D) Scientific development of smart farming technologies and their application in Brazil (170 Readers)

graphs of scientific development of smart farming technologies

Smart farming (SF) involves the incorporation of information and communication technologies into machinery, equipment, and sensors for use in agricultural production systems. New technologies such as the internet of things and cloud computing are expected to advance this development, introducing more robots and artificial intelligence into farming. Therefore, the aims of this paper are twofold: (i) to characterize the scientific knowledge about SF that is available in the worldwide scientific li…

Dieisson Pivoto et al. in Information Processing in Agriculture (2018)

E) Hierarchical Attention Networks for Document Classification (1349 Readers)

graphs of hierarchical attention networks

We propose a hierarchical attention network for document classification. Our model has two distinctive characteristics: (i) it has a hierarchical structure that mirrors the hierarchical structure of documents; (ii) it has two levels of attention mechanisms applied at the word and sentence-level, enabling it to attend differentially to more and less important content when constructing the document representation. Experiments conducted on six large scale text classification tasks demonstrate that …

Zichao Yang et al. in Proceedings of the 2016 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies (2016)


That’s it for open access Computer Science papers this month. If you enjoyed this post, please let us know with a like or share.

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

Changes to the Elsevier manuscript sharing policy: how they affect Mendeley & you

On April 30th, Elsevier updated its policies regarding how Elsevier papers may be used to more closely align with the STM Association principles and to address usage on social networks, which have become popular since the last time the policy was updated (yeah, it was that old!) For Mendeley and other sites on which research is shared, the main thing is that there are fewer restrictions on what sorts of use are permitted, but we also get some technical help with a new article tagging proposal.

What it means for a Mendeley user

The day-to-day experience of a researcher using Mendeley won’t change. We plan to use the new machine-readable information in the PDFs to improve our catalog search, recommendation features, and article-level information available via the Mendeley API. We would also like to encourage researchers to add the new author manuscripts to their researcher profiles.

While we continue to dream of and work towards a world where all research is available to anyone without restriction, this is a welcome step forward. At Mendeley, we worked closely with Elsevier to ensure these changes help the whole scholarly communications ecosystem – researchers, publishers, librarians, and developers of new technology – and found Elsevier a willing and forthcoming partner in our work to meet the changing needs of of researchers. For any new startups that have bold new ideas about how to make research better, get in touch with Alicia or Alexandra – they don’t bite!

What we like about the policy

  • We like that the policy is much simpler to understand. The old policy was complicated and had all sorts of exceptions. Simpler policies allow us to provide a better user experience.
  • We like that the policy is not too prescriptive re: sharing platforms. The online world changes rapidly and it’s good that Elsevier is signaling willingness to work with existing sites and whatever YikYak-for-research might be yet to come.
  • We like that author manuscripts have a CC license applied. This helps remove the uncertainty about reuse permissions.
  • We like that the policy isn’t just words – a proposed new standard for article tagging, to be developed in collaboration with sharing platforms and other publishers, will make it easier for us to build advanced search and discovery features, as well as to provide better article usage stats to Scopus, Altmetric.com, Plum Analytics, etc. Importantly for stats, the machine-readable tags will now include information such as article license & document version.

The above changes aren’t just good for us, they’re good for everyone – Mendeley user or not. We understand that researchers need a range of tools and services to support their work, so we worked hard to ensure these changes help the whole scholarly communications ecosystem – researchers, publishers, librarians, and developers of new technology. Of course, we’re on the progressive end of things at Mendeley, so there are some parts of the policy we don’t feel goes far enough.

What we don’t like about the policy

  • The author manuscript embargo. We believe that libraries and researchers will still value the permanently archived, DOI-linked, more readable and fully-citable version of record, regardless of the prevalence of author manuscripts. We’re not alone in our dislike of this, either. Harnad and Kevin Smith single this out as the main issue. Here’s the thing – it’s entirely reasonable for Elsevier to worry that IR copies might end up substituting for publisher copies. If librarians and researchers do actually value the permanently archived, DOI-linked, and variously enhanced version of record, you need to make your voices heard on this so that we can get policies based on evidence and demand, not worry and risk projections.
  • The NC-ND bit of the Creative Commons license on author manuscripts. The NC license will create confusion about use of the work in academic settings and the ND license will cause uncertainty in applications such as text-mining. For what it’s worth, we have been told the license isn’t intended to restrict use in classrooms or text mining.
  • The distinction between commercial and non-commercial sites. We don’t like that for-profit enterprise is singled out as if we’re somehow more risky to partner with. Mendeley reached out to Academia, ScienceScape, MyScienceWork, Pubchase, Sparrho and others for guidance as we worked with Elsevier, and their feedback has helped shape the policy. We would therefore like to suggest that the disdain we sometimes encounter within academia for for-profit enterprise is misplaced.
  • Overall, we think the positives outweigh the negatives. Though there’s bound to be some cases where one particular part of the policy has an outsized and unforeseen effect – this is inevitable when trying to restrict use of digital content – they are not presenting this policy as cast-iron and immutable for the next decade, so please let them know if some part of the policy is really ill-suited to your particular application.

    There’s one other thing we’d like to mention. It’ll do no good if this overture from Elsevier is ignored or repudiated, so we’d also like to suggest that criticism of the policy be done with a fresh set of eyes. We’re not suggesting that the past be forgotten and we’re certainly no stranger to grand-standing and revolutionary rhetoric, but we also think good behavior should be rewarded if there is to be more of it. Embargo aside, this does lift the burden somewhat on those trying to innovate in the scholarly communications space, so that’s why it is, on balance, a positive step forward in our eyes.

    Avoiding Research Pitfalls: Kristen Marhaver Talks@Mendeley


    Kristen 1

    Last week we welcomed Dr Kristen Marhaver to Talks@Mendeley. She travelled all the way from the Carmabi Research Institute in Curacao – one of the oldest research centres in the Caribbean where she studies coral reefs – to discuss how researchers can communicate their work more effectively, and what pitfalls they are likely to encounter along the way.

    She started off by explaining that her keen interest in Science Communication (and Digital Science in particular) came from a passion for the ocean, her concern over its collapse, and a wish to make a positive contribution towards conservation.

    She expanded on the theme of her recent Wired Article, talking about the problems that come from treating scientific research as a disposable commodity rather than a durable good, to be built incrementally over time.

    Science News

    “We have this situation where a paper that took 5 years to produce, which addresses 500 years of biology, gets 3 days of press attention. My question is, what happens in day 4? The media noise simply doesn’t match the severity of the problem.”

    The main problem, she believes, stems from the fact that science is not the news, but gets treated as such. And by approaching it as an ephemeral commodity, we’re doing a huge disservice to the research community and society in general.

    “Science News shouldn’t be something that ages. It shouldn’t be taboo to talk about science that was published last week, that is just absurd.”

    She also pointed out that Twitter is becoming a useful aggregator of science news:

    “We’ve reached a sort of speed limit on Twitter in we can’t produce enough news for a new tweet every five seconds, but that then creates a space for citizens to float things they believe are important back up to the surface, hence the #InCaseYouMissedIt phenomenon”

    Bad Translation

    Kristen also highlighted the problems around diluting or sensationalising scientific messages in order to make it more palatable or newsworthy. Since researchers don’t usually get to go on book tours or press tours to talk about their message, there is often a real danger of their work getting irrevocably misinterpreted along the way.

    “The main issue here is that scientific research is so specialized that there will be very few people in the world, apart from the original researcher, who are qualified to interpret and critically analyse that output, and to translate it to a broader audience.”

    There is, however, hope in the fact that we’re increasingly seeing the Internet acting as a platform for expert translators of this content.

    “You now have things like Altmetrics aggregating all the chatter around scientific research. When I first started talking about this a few years ago, there was really no way for the average citizen to look at a piece of research and figure out what gravitas it had, and what its real importance was.”

    However, she believes that altmetrics should not merely focus solely on counting mentions and other social interactions, but should prioritise aggregated content, curating expert opinions in such as way as to make research clearer and more accessible to the average person. At the moment, Altmetrics is something that is on the radar of the scientific community, but not exactly common knowledge to the general public. And that, says Marhaver, is something that really needs to change.

    “Every paper should come with a lay summary. This kind of tool is something that everybody should know about, and should be on every search search bar: Tell me more about this research in a language that makes sense to me

    That is actually something that chimes with some recent initiative by Mendeley and Elsevier, like the recently launched STM Digest , which aims to provide lay translations of scientific papers produced by experts with in-depth knowledge of the subject.

    OA Fundamentalism

    “It’s hard for conservationists to pick their battles wisely, but sometimes you have to let small things go to win the bigger fights.”

    Kristen draws parallels here with the Open Access debate, saying there are papers that people simply need to have access to, and that some content needs OA more urgently than others. This is something that scientists have actually started to address by self-sorting based on OA importance, publishing papers with broader societal impact into Open Access journals and more specialized content in others. She recognises that Elsevier initiatives such as Atlas are a good start, but wants them to go further

    “My dream is that all the big publishing houses took a small percentage of the most important papers in areas such as food security and conservation, things that they recognised that the public really needed to know about, and just opened those up?”

    Talking to Ourselves

    “We used to be in the proverbial scientific Ivory Tower talking to ourselves and it was considered shameful and even corrupting for scientists to mingle with the common folk”

    We like to think that things have moved on since then because these conversations now happens on the Internet, but the danger is they don’t actually manage to reach the general public.

    “You can’t simply rely on creating social networks around scientific content because content is too rare, if your content is PDFs, you don’t have new ones to add very often, unlike Twitter and Facebook. We also need to ask ourselves whether we’re creating great things with our knowledge, or are we just making more click bait?”

    Q&A

    Before going on to answer questions from the Mendeley team, Kristen finished on a positive note:

    “Science Communication is booming, and baby corals are growing.”

    And that just has to be a good thing.

    Mendeley's top time-saver tips for early career researchers.

    So you’ve slaved away all year long, passing up pool party and barbecue invitations to feed the needs of the research beast, and you’ve finally got something to show for it. The next question is how do you get it published, where, and what do you do after that so it doesn’t end up with two readers, one of which is your mom? We won’t presume to tell you where, but we do have a few tips for things to consider, which you may have missed because you were slaving away at the bench or in the library like a good student and not reading up on all the cool stuff that’s happened this summer in the exciting world of academic publishing. So here’s our summary of the new (and we presume you’ve already heard the old from your PI).Read More »

    Do you know an example of open access research helping the public good? Nominate the team for a $30k ASAP award!

    The Public Library of Science, the Wellcome Trust, and Google recently announced the Accelerating Science Award Program. If you know someone who has applied or reused scientific research in an innovative way to advance science, medicine, or technology, you can nominate them for an ASAP award. The goal of ASAP is to reward people for publishing and re-using open access research and also to gather compelling use cases for open access.

    This program has major support from publishers, funders, and the tech community and they have put up some serious prize money – $30,000 for each of three winners. The nomination period opened May 1 and runs through June 15. Potential nominees may include individuals or teams of scientists, researchers, educators, entrepreneurs, policy makers, patient advocates, public health workers, students, or anyone else, as long as they have reused open access research in a innovative way. The winners will be announced during Open Access Week in October 2013 in Washington, DC at an event hosted by SPARC and the World Bank. Mendeley is assisting by publicizing the event and gathering nominations, and Creative Commons, along with several other library organizations, publishers, and research organizations are also sponsoring the event.

    More information is available at http://asap.plos.org/