Medicine and Dentistry Top 5 Trending Papers for December 2018

During December we analysed millions of academic papers in Medicine and Dentistry to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the Medicine and Dentistry discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog page, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.

  • Topics in this list: Thrombectomy, Global Cancer Statistics 2018, Bungarus Caeruleus, Regional and National Causes of Under-5 Mortality, Sleep Quality of Medical Students

A) Thrombectomy 6 to 24 Hours after Stroke with a Mismatch between Deficit and Infarct (743 Readers)

The effect of endovascular thrombectomy that is performed more than 6 hours after the onset of ischemic stroke is uncertain. Patients with a clinical…

Nogueira R. et al. in New England Journal of Medicine (2017)

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B) Global cancer statistics 2018: GLOBOCAN estimates of incidence and mortality worldwide for 36 cancers in 185 countries (1191 Readers)

This article provides a status report on the global burden of cancer worldwide using the GLOBOCAN 2018 estimates of cancer incidence and mortality produced by the…

Bray F. et al. in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians (2018)

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C) Neuromuscular Effects of Common Krait (Bungarus caeruleus) Envenoming in Sri Lanka (64 Readers)

OBJECTIVE We aimed to investigate neurophysiological and clinical effects of common krait envenoming, including the time course and treatment…

Silva A. et al. in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases (2016)

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D) Global, regional, and national causes of under-5 mortality in 2000–15: an updated systematic analysis with implications for the Sustainable Development Goals (825 Readers)

Background Despite remarkable progress in the improvement of child survival between 1990 and 2015, the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 target of a two-thirds reduction of…

Liu L. et al. in The Lancet (2016)

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E) Sleep quantity, quality, and insomnia symptoms of medical students during clinical years: Relationship with stress and academic performance (160 Readers)

To determine sleep habits and sleep quality in medical students during their clinical years using validated measures; and to investigate associations…

Alsaggaf M. in Saudi Medical Journal (2016)

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That’s it for open access Medicine and Dentistry papers this month. If you like this curation, please let us know with a like or share.

 

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

 

Business, Management and Accounting Top 5 Trending Papers for December 2018

During December we analysed millions of academic papers in Business, Management and Accounting to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog page, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.

  • Topics in this list: Big Data Challenges, Business Model Innovation, Business Models for Sustainability, Sustainable Business Model Innovation

A) Critical analysis of Big Data challenges and analytical methods (1079 Readers)

Big Data (BD), with their potential to ascertain valued insights for enhanced decision-making process, have recently attracted substantial…

Sivarajah U. et al. in Journal of Business Research (2017)

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B) Fifteen Years of Research on Business Model Innovation: How Far Have We Come, and Where Should We Go? (613 Readers)

Over the last 15 years, business model innovation (BMI) has gained an increasing amount of attention in management research and among practitioners…

Foss N. et al. in Journal of Management (2016)

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C) Business Models for Sustainability: Origins, Present Research, and Future Avenue (350 Readers)

The recent global economic and financial crises have raised fundamental questions about the impacts of existing corporate business models on the sustainability of the global economy and society…

Stefan S. et al. in Organization and Environment (2016)

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D) Sustainable business model innovation: A review (161 Readers)

The capability to rapidly and successfully move into new business models is an important source of sustainable competitive advantage and a key leverage to improve the sustainability performance…

Lena A. et al. in Journal of Cleaner Production (2018)

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E) Debating big data: A literature review on realizing value from big data (591 Readers)

Big data has been considered to be a breakthrough technological development over recent years. Notwithstanding, we have as yet limited understanding of how organizations translate its potential…

Wendy Arianne G. et al. in Journal of Strategic Information Systems (2017)

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That’s it for open access Business, Management and Accounting papers this month. If you like this curation, please let us know with a like or share.

 

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

Engineering Top 5 Trending Papers for December 2018

During December we analysed millions of academic papers in Engineering to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the Engineering discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog page, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.

  • Topics in this list: Photovoltaics, Natural Fibres, Sustainable Manufacturing, Additive Manufacturing, Parkinson’s and Wearables

A) A review of transparent solar photovoltaic technologies (2049 Readers)

Energy is essential for economic development and growth. With the rapid growth of development and the drive to expand the economy, society demands more electricity…

Husain A. et al. in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (2018)

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B) A review of recent developments in natural fibre composites and their mechanical performance (1166 Readers)

Recently, there has been a rapid growth in research and innovation in the natural fibre composite (NFC) area. Interest is warranted due to the advantages of these materials compared to others, such as synthetic fibre composites, including low environmental impact…

L. P. et al. in Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing (2016)

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C) Opportunities of Sustainable Manufacturing in Industry 4.0 (987 Readers)

The current globalization is faced by the challenge to meet the continuously growing worldwide demand for capital and consumer goods by simultaneously ensuring a sustainable evolvement…

Stock T. et al. in Procedia CIRP (2016)

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D) Additive manufacturing methods and modeling approaches: A critical review (691 Readers)

Additive manufacturing is a technology rapidly expanding on a number of industrial sectors. It provides design freedom and environmental/ecological advantages.

Bikas H. et al. in International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology (2016)

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E) Wearable sensors objectively measure gait parameters in Parkinson’s disease (131 Readers)

Distinct gait characteristics like short steps and shuffling gait are prototypical signs commonly observed in Parkinson’s disease. Routinely assessed by observation through clinicians, gait is rated as part of categorical clinical scores…

Johannes C.M. S. et al. in PLoS ONE (2017)

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That’s it for open access Engineering papers this month. If you like this curation, please let us know with a like or share.

 

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

 

Agricultural and Biological Sciences Top 5 Trending Papers for December 2018

During December we analysed millions of academic papers in Agricultural and Biological Sciences to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the Agricultural and Biological Sciences discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog page, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.

  • Topics in this list: Phenotyping, Warming and Biodiversity, Pd-1, Habitat Fragmentation, Temperature Extremes

A) Translating High-Throughput Phenotyping into Genetic Gain (135 Readers)

Inability to efficiently implement high-throughput field phenotyping is increasingly perceived as a key component that limits genetic gain in breeding programs…

Araus J. et al. in Trends in Plant Science (2018)

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B) Changes in temperature alter the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (92 Readers)

Empirical evidence for the response of ecosystem functioning to the combined effects of warming and biodiversity loss is scarce. We show that warming…

García F. et al. in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018)

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C) Pan-tumor genomic biomarkers for PD-1 checkpoint blockade–based immunotherapy (257 Readers)

Programmed cell death protein–1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand–1 (PD-L1) checkpoint blockade immunotherapy elicits durable antitumor effects…

Cristescu R. et al. in Science (2018)

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D) Habitat fragmentation and its lasting impact on Earth’s ecosystems (1879 Readers)

We conducted an analysis of global forest cover to reveal that 70% of remaining forest is within 1 km of the forest’s edge, subject to the degrading effects…

Haddad N. et al. in Science Advances (2015)

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E) Temperature extremes: Effect on plant growth and development (809 Readers)

Temperature is a primary factor affecting the rate of plant development. Warmer temperatures expected with climate change and the potential for more extreme temperature events will impact plant productivity…

Jerry L. H. et al. in Weather and Climate Extremes (2015)

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That’s it for open access Agricultural and Biological Sciences papers this month. If you like this curation, please let us know with a like or share.

 

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

 

Computer Science Top 5 Trending Papers for December 2018

During December we analysed millions of academic papers in Computer Science to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the Computer Science discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog page, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.

  • Topics in this list: Internet of Things, Neural Machine Translation, Adversarial Nets, Big Data Prediction

A) A survey on Internet of Things architectures (1008 Readers)

Internet of Things is a platform where every day devices become smarter, every day processing becomes intelligent, and every day communication becomes informative. While the Internet of Things is still seeking its own shape…

Ray P. P. in Journal of King Saud University – Computer and Information Sciences (2018)

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B) Neural Machine Translation of Rare Words with Subword Units (563 Readers)

Neural machine translation (NMT) models typically operate with a fixed vocabulary, so the translation of rare and unknown words is an open problem…

Sennrich R. et al. in ACL (2016)

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C) Effective Approaches to Attention-based Neural Machine Translation (2020 Readers)

An attentional mechanism has lately been used to improve neural machine translation (NMT) by selectively focusing on parts of the source sentence during…

Luong M. at al. in None (2015)

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D) SeqGAN: Sequence Generative Adversarial Nets with Policy Gradient (1317 Readers)

As a new way of training generative models, Generative Adversarial Nets (GAN) that uses a discriminative model to guide the training of the generative model…

Yu L. et al. in JAMA Intern Med (2016)

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E) Randomly distributed embedding making short-term high-dimensional data predictable (60 Readers)

Making accurate forecast or prediction is a challenging task in the big data era, in particular for those datasets involving high-dimensional variables but…

Ma H. et al. in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018)

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That’s it for open access Computer Science papers this month. If you like this curation, please let us know with a like or share.

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

Staying healthy while you research: Live webinar on mental health, imposter syndrome and dealing with the stress of research

By Priyanka Kalra

impostorEver had the feeling that you have faked your way into your career and you don’t deserve to be where you are? Well, to prove that you are not the only one, there is actually an entire psychological concept called imposter syndrome devoted this feeling. According to Hugh Kearns, an expert on self-management, positive psychology and work-life balance, “imposter syndrome is that nagging feeling you have, that somehow you don’t belong, you haven’t earned your success and that at any moment you will be uncovered.”

The syndrome manifests itself strongly and comfortably within academia, given its elite nature and competitive atmosphere. In addition to feeling like a fake, research also shows that imposter phenomenon can impact researchers in ways that they “conduct less research and are less willing to present at conferences or publish.” These feelings and thoughts can manifest into insecurities resulting in or leading to anxiety and self-doubt.

So, the question then is, what can researchers do to control these feelings or keep them from effecting their work? Other than recognising these doubts and categorising them under the phenomenon of imposter syndrome, individuals can use other techniques to curb these feelings. According to Hugh, if the imposter feelings start to take over, researchers can focus on the evidence and separate imposter feelings and imposter syndrome from a real imposter. “The crucial feature of imposter feelings and the imposter syndrome is that there is clear evidence that you are not an imposter, but you still feel like one. So, if you want to know whether you are an imposter or not – look at the evidence,” he adds.

Yet, advice around these issues can be rather ambiguous and to concretely address these pertinent issues, Researcher Academy, with the help of Hugh Kearns, is devoting the month of November to discuss mental health and imposter syndrome. In a live webinar to take place on 23rd of November (2pm UTC), Hugh Kearns will discuss the not-so-exciting part of research and share techniques that can help you stay healthy while you work. The webinar will tackle the perineal issues within research that add stress and inhibit imposter feelings and will further ways of dealing with setbacks, strategies to efficiently counter imposter syndrome and most importantly, teach you how to switch off and take care of yourself. The webinar will give you a chance to interact with Hugh and ask any questions you have about maintaining a healthy research career. You can also join the Researcher Academy Mendeley group to ask any questions in advance which Hugh can make a part of the webinar.

See you then and happy researching!

 

Mendeley advisor of the month: Sunday Linus Makama (DVM, MFS, PhD, ERT)

makamaSunday Makama is a researcher with interest in Food and Environmental Health and safety, and currently works at the National Veterinary Research Institute (NVRI), Vom, Nigeria. He is a Chief Veterinary Research Officer (CVRO), Toxicology in the Biochemistry Division of the NVRI. He has researched into various aspects of Emerging Food borne viruses, Food and Environmental Toxicology, Nanotechnology, Ethnoveterinary medicine, and Antimicrobial and other chemical residues. Before his current position, Sunday has worked as a private Veterinary practitioner, then as a Sales and Technical representative of an Agro-allied Company. His research works were conducted in several institutions at different times including the Netherlands Food Safety Institute (RIKILT) and Wageningen University and Research (WUR), the Netherlands Institute for Public Health and Environment (RIVM) and Alterra, the Institute for Environmental Research, WUR.

Sunday holds a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree from the Ahmadu Bello University (ABU), Zaria. He also holds a Master’s degree in Food Safety (MFS) and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree in toxicology from the Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands. Sunday is also a certified European Registered Toxicologist (ERT).

How did you get into your field and what is your research story?

Towards the end of my Bachelors program in Veterinary College, I contemplated what I wanted to do with my Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree. Clinical practice, especially surgery fascinated me; so did issues of food safety and security as well as public health and environmental health and safety. I love finding answers to very intriguing questions, especially those that have significant impact on public health and environment. The research field provided a good opportunity to be involved in all these interests in a meaningful way. Afterall, multidisciplinarity is the spice of both fundamental and applied research. Now when I realized research and development was going to be the core of my career path, I wanted to be involved in doing something novel. The emerging (or re-emerging) fields in science like emerging technologies (nanotechnology) and emerging infectious diseases therefore, became my primary interests.

Where do you do your research/work the best? What kind of environment suits you?

A nice, clean and comfortable environment with lots of nature and a soft music (including those from nature) is a perfect setting for me. The only addition would be some tea.

How long have you been on Mendeley? 

Officially, I have been on Mendeley since January 2015

What were you using prior to Mendeley and how does Mendeley influence your research?

I used EndNote mostly and once in a while the Microsoft Word citations & bibliography. Mendeley has now become my main reference manager and with so much interactive and simple user interface, it is safe to say Mendeley plays a significant role in my research.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor and how are you involved with the program?

Working in a research environment with the inherent requirement of dissemination of your findings means lots of reading and writing. Finding a tool that is well amenable to your reading, writing and networking needs is a great relief that it will be inconceivable to ignore such an excellent support. Now, when you find a helpful tool that has aided your research work, it is only proper to share the good news. Being a passionate advocate for sharing of useful knowledge and seeing the enormous need around me, I decided to contribute my quota by transferring Mendeley knowledge to those that need it; and what a blessing it has been! I could liken my experience to that of the three Samaritan lepers (in Biblical times) who found food in the time Samaria was under siege and told themselves, “we do not well!” by not sharing the good news.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Hmmm… that’s a tough one. I think it will be Prof. dr. Marcel H. Zwietering of Wageningen University.

What book are you reading at the moment and why?

I am actually reading two books:

  1. Why Nations Fail by Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson
  2. The Richest Man in Babylon by George S. Clason (Read it several times).

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

The fastest person does not necessarily win the race.

What is the best part about working in research?

Getting to work in a multidisciplinary environment and overcoming the challenges of deciphering the unknown.

And the worst/most challenging part about working in research?

The weight of responsibility laid upon you by the fact that many depend on your findings to guide sometimes very critical decisions and policies.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is a sweet medley; a researcher’s best friend.