29 November 2010 by Jason Hoyt

We held another Mendeley Open Office on Friday, November 26, 2010. Trying something new, we are now doing talks. And as promised, here is the talk I gave on increasing the visibility of your research. I’ve added speech bubbles to the slides to give some of them more context in case you were not here to listen to it live. I also added a little more information that wasn’t on a few of the slides on the actual evening. This was a Friday evening talk, with dozens of people happily enjoying beverages and mingling, so needed to be kept short.

One thing that is important to point out is that improving your career means marketing it, just like you would take a grant writing course to improve your odds of funding. Some people might look down on this; they’ll be the first to be left behind in a world where finding the needle in a haystack of millions of research articles is more and more dependent upon academic search engines such as Mendeley, Google Scholar, or PubMed. This is becoming known as ‘Academic SEO’ and is a variant of SEO or Search Engine Optimization. And just like regular SEO, there are expected methods you should be doing to get your content indexed. There are of course things that you shouldn’t do, and that’s where we need to start drawing the line and is a discussion for another time.

If you are having trouble reading some of the text, then click on the menu and ‘View Fullscreen’ option.

Jason Hoyt is Chief Scientist & VP of R&D at Mendeley. Where, among other projects, he oversees the indexing of content and the search/recommendation engines. Follow him on twitter @jasonHoyt

Tags: , , , , , , ,

3 Responses to “Academic SEO – Market (And Publish) or Perish”

  1. Sjurdur Says:

    very interesting blog! But made wonder. What is the ethical line of SEO that shouldnt be crossed?

  2. Mr. Gunn Says:

    I would say it’s the same as SEO in web page search results – Keep the searcher in mind and don’t engage in practices that have promoting visibility as an end in itself, such as having keywords for a popular topic in your paper when they’re clearly not relevant, or giving your paper a title that ranks well but doesn’t describe what the paper is actually about.

  3. J├Âran Says:

    if you are interested in academic seo (or ASEO as we call it), you might like to read our articles we published about this and the possibilities of abusing it:

    http://sciplore.org/blog/2010/01/02/academic-search-engine-optimization-make-your-articles-better-findable/

    http://sciplore.org/blog/2010/12/18/do-you-trust-google-scholar/