Top 5 Trending Agricultural and Biological Sciences Papers in January 2019

Field of wheat

Top 5 Trending Agricultural and Biological Sciences Papers in January 2019

During January we analysed millions of open access academic papers in Agricultural and Biological Sciences to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the Agricultural and Biological Sciences discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.


A) Identification of ADAR1 adenosine deaminase dependency in a subset of cancer cells (20 Readers)

identification of ADAR1

Systematic exploration of cancer cell vulnerabilities can inform the development of novel cancer therapeutics. Here, through analysis of genome-scale loss-of-function datasets, we identify adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR or ADAR1) as an essential gene for the survival of a subset of cancer cell lines. ADAR1-dependent cell lines display increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes. Activation of type I interferon signaling in the context of ADAR1 deficiency can induce cell lethalit…

Hugh S. Gannon et al. in Nature Communications (2018)

B) Methylation-based enrichment facilitates low-cost, noninvasive genomic scale sequencing of populations from feces (337 Readers)

Methylation-based enrichment

Obtaining high-quality samples from wild animals is a major obstacle for genomic studies of many taxa, particularly at the population level, as collection methods for such samples are typically invasive. DNA from feces is easy to obtain noninvasively, but is dominated by bacterial and other non-host DNA. The high proportion of non-host DNA drastically reduces the efficiency of high-throughput sequencing for host animal genomics. To address this issue, we developed an inexpensive capture method f…

Kenneth L. Chiou et al. in Scientific Reports (2018)

C) Soil quality – A critical review (599 Readers)

soil quality graph

Sampling and analysis or visual examination of soil to assess its status and use potential is widely practiced from plot to national scales. However, the choice of relevant soil attributes and interpretation of measurements are not straightforward, because of the complexity and site-specificity of soils, legacy effects of previous land use, and trade-offs between ecosystem services. Here we review soil quality and related concepts, in terms of definition, assessment approaches, and indicator sel…

Else K. Bünemann et al. in Soil Biology and Biochemistry (2018)

D) Conserved fungal effector suppresses PAMP-triggered immunity by targeting plant immune kinases (12 Readers)

conserved fungal

Plant pathogens have optimized their own effector sets to adapt to their hosts. However, certain effectors, regarded as core effectors, are conserved among various pathogens, and may therefore play an important and common role in pathogen virulence. We report here that the widely distributed fungal effector NIS1 targets host immune components that transmit signaling from pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in plants. NIS1 from two Colletotrichum spp. suppressed the hypersen…

Hiroki Irieda et al. in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018)

E) Plant hormone-mediated regulation of stress responses (376 Readers)

Plant hormone-mediated regulation of stress

Background: Being sessile organisms, plants are often exposed to a wide array of abiotic and biotic stresses. Abiotic stress conditions include drought, heat, cold and salinity, whereas biotic stress arises mainly from bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes and insects. To adapt to such adverse situations, plants have evolved well-developed mechanisms that help to perceive the stress signal and enable optimal growth response. Phytohormones play critical roles in helping the plants to adapt to adver…

Vivek Verma et al. in BMC Plant Biology (2016)


That’s it for open access Agricultural and Biological Sciences papers this month. If you enjoyed this post, please let us know with a like or share.

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

 

Top 5 Trending Business, management and accounting Papers in January 2019

Busy street with a lot of people

Top 5 Trending Business, Management and Accounting Papers in January 2019

During January we analysed millions of open access academic papers in Business, Management and Accounting to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the Business, Management and Accounting discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.


A) Entrepreneurial self-efficacy: A systematic review of the literature on its antecedents and outcomes, and an agenda for future research (72 Readers)

Woman with laptop

With increased emphasis being placed on entrepreneurial thinking and acting in today’s careers, we have witnessed growing research on entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) over the last two decades. The present study provides a systematic review of the literature on the theoretical foundations, measurement, antecedents, and outcomes of ESE, and work which treats ESE as a moderator. Based on the review, an agenda for future research is developed and implications for entrepreneurship education and t…

Alexander Newman et al. in Journal of Vocational Behavior (2018)

B) Possibilities and Barriers for Using Electric-powered Vehicles in City Logistics Practice (104 Readers)

gasoline compartment of a car

This paper discusses the current developments, as well as the barriers and opportunities for using electric freight vehicles in daily city logistics operations based on the experiences from a number of running demonstrations. This paper discusses results from other studies and demonstrations that were published on electro mobility in city logistics in the last three years, as an update of an earlier state of the art review. Next, we present recent narratives based on the more than 100 electric f…

Hans Quak et al. in Transportation Research Procedia (2016)

C) Studying the links between organizational culture, innovation, and performance in Spanish companies (395 Readers)

graph showing the links between organizational culture, innovation and performance in Spanish companies

Innovation is considered to be one of the key factors that influence the long-term success of a company in the competitive markets of today. As a result, there is a growing interest in the further study of the determining factors of innovation. Today, the focus is on these factors related to people and behavior, emphasizing the role of organizational culture, as a factor that can both stimulate or restrain innovation, and therefore affect company performance. However, there is little empirical r…

Julia C. Naranjo-Valencia et al. in Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia (2016)

D) An Industry 4.0 Research Agenda for Sustainable Business Models (281 Readers)

mechanic fixing a car

In the Industry 4.0 world that is digitalizing and automating, sustainable business models exist but have not become mainstream. Opportunities for sustainable offerings exist by designing products for longevity, repair and recycling, such that sustainability is not only focusing on being more efficient, but also on using less raw materials and recycling more products. This changes the value proposition, supply chain, relation with the customer and financial justification of a business model. Thi…

Johannes Cornelis De Man et al. in Procedia CIRP (2017)

E) E-commerce Logistics in Supply Chain Management: Practice Perspective (229 Readers)

train rails and train running

E-commerce is booming with the development of new business model and will be continuously boosted in the several decades. With large number of enterprises carrying out E-commerce, logistics driven under the background has been largely influenced. This paper presents the state-of-the-art E-commerce logistics in supply chain management from a view of practice perspective. Worldwide implementations and corresponding models together with supporting techniques are reviewed in this paper. Typical E-co…

Ying Yu et al. in Procedia CIRP (2016)


That’s it for open access Business, Management and Accounting papers this month. If you enjoyed this post, please let us know with a like or share.

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

 

Top 5 Trending Computer Science Papers in January 2019

island with a beach

Top 5 Trending Computer Science Papers in January 2019

During January we analysed millions of open access academic papers in Computer Science to discover the top 5 articles being read by Mendeley users in the Computer Science discipline. We believe these papers will have an impact on the influential academic papers of tomorrow.

Mendeley Trending considers the number of people reading a specific paper, the change in number of new readers within a timeframe and how recently the paper was published.

Some of these papers can be viewed on the Mendeley Web Catalog, and to access others you may need to click on ‘Get full text’ to view it on the publisher’s site.


A) A survey on sentiment analysis challenges (230 Readers)

graph of sentiment analysis

With accelerated evolution of the internet as websites, social networks, blogs, online portals, reviews, opinions, recommendations, ratings, and feedback are generated by writers. This writer generated sentiment content can be about books, people, hotels, products, research, events, etc. These sentiments become very beneficial for businesses, governments, and individuals. While this content is meant to be useful, a bulk of this writer generated content require using the text mining techniques an…

Doaa Mohey El Din Mohamed Hussein et al. in Journal of King Saud University – Engineering Sciences (2018)

B) Opportunities and challenges in developing deep learning models using electronic health records data: A systematic review (162 Readers)

Infographics of the opportunities and challenges in developing deep learning models using electronic health data

OBJECTIVE Electronic health records (EHRs) are an increasingly common data source for clinical risk prediction, presenting both unique analytic opportunities and challenges. We sought to evaluate the current state of EHR based risk prediction modeling through a systematic review of clinical prediction studies using EHR data. METHODS We searched PubMed for articles that reported on the use of an EHR to develop a risk prediction model from 2009 to 2014. Articles were extracted by two reviewers, an…

Cao Xiao et al. in Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (2018)

C) Big Data in Smart Farming – A review (971 Readers)

Smart Farming is a development that emphasizes the use of information and communication technology in the cyber-physical farm management cycle. New technologies such as the Internet of Things and Cloud Computing are expected to leverage this development and introduce more robots and artificial intelligence in farming. This is encompassed by the phenomenon of Big Data, massive volumes of data with a wide variety that can be captured, analysed and used for decision-making. This review aims to gain…

Sjaak Wolfert et al. in Agricultural Systems (2017)

D) Scientific development of smart farming technologies and their application in Brazil (170 Readers)

graphs of scientific development of smart farming technologies

Smart farming (SF) involves the incorporation of information and communication technologies into machinery, equipment, and sensors for use in agricultural production systems. New technologies such as the internet of things and cloud computing are expected to advance this development, introducing more robots and artificial intelligence into farming. Therefore, the aims of this paper are twofold: (i) to characterize the scientific knowledge about SF that is available in the worldwide scientific li…

Dieisson Pivoto et al. in Information Processing in Agriculture (2018)

E) Hierarchical Attention Networks for Document Classification (1349 Readers)

graphs of hierarchical attention networks

We propose a hierarchical attention network for document classification. Our model has two distinctive characteristics: (i) it has a hierarchical structure that mirrors the hierarchical structure of documents; (ii) it has two levels of attention mechanisms applied at the word and sentence-level, enabling it to attend differentially to more and less important content when constructing the document representation. Experiments conducted on six large scale text classification tasks demonstrate that …

Zichao Yang et al. in Proceedings of the 2016 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies (2016)


That’s it for open access Computer Science papers this month. If you enjoyed this post, please let us know with a like or share.

Explore the Mendeley Web Catalog here.

Meet the team: Heather Williams

Heather Williams

Job title

Sr. Product Manager for Mendeley Careers

Introduction

I studied as a psychologist and majored in human-technology interaction (human factors). My first job was at the US DOD Human Systems Analyst Centers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Case in Ohio. Later I moved to LexisNexis, inspired by what I heard a couple of my grad school mates were doing there, I wanted to do that too. While I was at LexisNexis I learned of a User-Centered Design Group at Elsevier and I felt interested in creating designs for doctors, nurses and researchers and applied to move. I interviewed nine times and even created a prototype to get a position there, which worked. While at Elsevier, I got the opportunity to work in nearly each business unit in the company, and I’ve interviewed hundreds of our users in multiple fields and disciplines in health, science, technology and engineering.

After thirteen years, I relocated to Amsterdam from New York, still doing user understanding and design, but I moved in to an R&D group. While in this group I switched careers and moved into product management. I was now working with other designers and other disciplines. During this period, I got involved with a concept that developed into a full product launch – Mendeley Careers. I stayed with it. That launch moved me officially to Mendeley. Nearly nineteen years later, I still love working in this company.

But I also enjoy other fun stuff – making new memories with my family and friends over food and/or travel. I learned to enjoy running. I love to go to gigs. I like to ski when I can get to snow & altitude. I laugh easily and really like experiencing good design in all its forms.

When did you join Mendeley?

1 December 2016

What do you love most about your job?

I love all of it the most. I literally believe in the power of human connection to the users I serve and their connection to improvement of society and our planet.

What book did you most recently read?

The Platform Revolution. It was really good, but I should find something else to read next.

What’s one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

We believe in you. That might sound a bit cheesy, but helping others make improvements, increasing knowledge, is what motivates me so much about my role here at Mendeley.

How would you explain your job to a stranger on a bus?

I help researchers make better connections between their work and others. Hopefully it increases their chances for better collaboration and other research opportunities to help them move their work forward.

What’s the most exciting part of your job?

The problems we help solve.

What keeps you awake at night?

I sleep really well. Solutions to complicated problems often get resolved in my dreams. So I like my sleep ☺

Show your love for #MyMendeley!

As Mendeley Advisors, you do a great job speaking to the researcher community on your campus about the benefits of using Mendeley. But now we’re calling on you to spread the word even further! Take part in #MyMendeley by making a short video (15 seconds or less) about why you love Mendeley, and upload it to YouTube so we can share it across the social media universe.  (We’ve also raided the marketing giveaways cupboard, so we’ll be sending backpacks and t-shirts to the makers of our favourite videos.)

So here’s how it works:

  • Upload a short video of yourself to YouTube, telling us about why you love Mendeley – maybe how it helps you with your research, your favourite feature, or why you’d recommend it to others
  • Tag your video with #MyMendeley so we can find it and share it

What’s in it for you?

  • Mendeley Glory! We’ll be sharing the videos across our social media channels, so your wisdom will travel far and wide
  • Giveaways! We’ve got new t-shirts and some other fun things to send to the makers of our favourite videos

Looking for inspiration?  Check out Mendeley team members Rachel and Daniel’s videos.

Some tips for making a good video:

  • Keep your video short and snappy (15 seconds or less)
  • Use a fun background! Maybe your lab, a sign of your university or something else that shows where you are from. We used New York City’s famous Grand Central Terminal and Elsevier’s rare book room at our Amsterdam headquarters
  • Film somewhere that doesn’t have too much background noise
  • Give your video a catchy title, and feel free to tell us more about yourself, your research and how you use Mendeley in the description
  • Don’t forget to tag your video with #MyMendeley so we can find it!

We’re looking forward to seeing your videos.

 

Case Reports Live Webinar: How to write good case reports and get them published

Good case report foldersAs a scientific documentation on a single clinical observation, case reports offer timely and valuable information of best medical practices, especially on rare diseases. They show doctors how fellow practitioners have acted in similar situations and thus aid in the decision-making process. Not only do they significantly contribute to the medical knowledge pool, but they also help add to researchers’ portfolio. For those reasons, case reports have been a time-honoured and rich tradition in medical publication.

Writing a good case report, however, requires much more than just an interesting case. In fact, the most common reason for the rejection of case reports lies in writing styles. This can be a real challenge, especially for early-career researchers who are sharing their clinical experiences for the first time. Apart from that, it is also important to take into consideration the ethical issues and the journals to publish in. As suggested by Professor Oliver Kurzai, Editor-in-Chief of Medical Mycology Case Reports, case reports are often not as well cited as other publications, and therefore, publishing your work in the right journal will ensure it is read by the right people.

Case reports may sound quite overwhelming with all the work they demand. Yet, there are a lot of resources that can help you solve this puzzle. Adding to this knowledge, Researcher Academy, is hosting a webinar on How to Write Case Reports with Oliver Kurzai and Adilia Warris, the Editor-in-Chief and Editorial Board member of Medical Mycology Case Reports journal. The webinar will be held on Thursday, February 28th (2pm UTC) to give researchers a chance to interact with the editors who will talk them through the process of choosing suitable subjects, setting up and writing case reports, considering ethical issues as well as selecting an appropriate journal to publish in. You can now send the speakers questions in advance by joining the Researcher Academy Mendeley group and post your queries there.

Register for free here and see you at the webinar!

The importance of interoperability

We recognize that interoperability is vitally important to Mendeley users. Our users should be able to easily integrate what they are doing on Mendeley with other applications and tools. We also want to ensure that this workflow experience is seamless: moving from our platform to one that you use for different tasks should be quick and simple to do.

To help achieve this, we’ve always had and will continue to have an open public API (application programming interface). Many companies and developers use our API, because it’s the most stable way for them to integrate their products with Mendeley. Organizations like F1000, the Centre for Open Science (COS) and Altmetric.com have been using it freely for many years. We’re committed to maintaining this open API for third party developers. It’s available at https://dev.mendeley.com/

Last year, a Mendeley update went live that had the unintentional consequence of hindering interoperability. We made a change to the Mendeley Desktop application that broke some integrations with users’ local Mendeley database, including Zotero’s import tool, which resulted in it not working with Mendeley. We’re really sorry about this — it was never our intention to break these integrations and we should have picked this up in release testing.

We’ve heard a lot from our users about this and our team has been working behind the scenes on two things.

First, we clearly heard from users that they want to be more in control of how and when they can export their PDFs, annotations and highlights directly from Mendeley. Improvements were released in Mendeley Desktop version 1.19.3 and further improvements to the export process will be released as part of Mendeley Desktop version 1.19.4.

Second, we’ll work to release a long-term stable Zotero integration. This solution will be available in the 1.19.5 release of Mendeley Desktop towards the middle of this year. We’ll let everyone know the exact dates that this will go live as soon as we can. To be clear, users can still move their libraries to Zotero, it’s just that they can’t do it using the Zotero importer tool. Click here to find out how.

UPDATE January 2020: We previously told you that the solution to the long-term stable Zotero integration would be available in the 1.19.5 release of Mendeley Desktop in 2019. We are now planning to release this solution in 2020, and the version number will be 1.19.6 and not 1.19.5 as we previously indicated in this blog post. Mendeley Desktop 1.19.5 was released on 2 May 2019. You can find more information about our releases at: www.mendeley.com/release-notes

I must say a big thank you to the users who’ve spoken to us in detail about these issues. They’ve helped us better understand how they’re using and interacting with our platform. We’ve updated our procedures to incorporate this feedback, including improving our Customer Support information and services; and we’ve reviewed our testing procedures for new releases. Mendeley Desktop users can also get previews of upcoming releases by signing up for development releases in Mendeley Desktop if they want to, which makes new features and updates available before we roll them out more widely.

I’m excited by the developments we have in the pipeline. Our team is working hard to deliver these as soon as we can.

Laura Thomson, Head of Reference Management

What’s new with Mendeley? The Mendeley Advisor Briefing!

We tried something new recently: An Advisor Briefing Webinar that gives Mendeley Advisors a chance to give feedback on what we are cooking up here at Mendeley HQ. To be honest, we weren’t sure if you would be interested in spending an hour with us on the internet, but it turns out hundreds of you were! One of you even stayed up until 1:00 to join us live… Wow!

This Advisor Briefing session is now available as a recording for those who missed it or just want to watch it again.

In this session, we had two topics:

  • Product Manager Adrian Raudaschl introduced the new Event Management platform we are working on for Advisors. This platform is designed to help manage event registration and track attendance. If you are interested in testing the system, drop us an email: community@elsevier.com

 

  • Laura Thomson, Head of Reference Manager, gave a demo of the new Mendeley Reference Manager. The new Reference Manager is part of ongoing work at Mendeley to keep the software healthy. By strengthening the foundation of Reference Manager, we will be able to add new features and functionalities more easily. After watching the session, we’d love to get your feedback on the new Reference Manager Beta. While we don’t have feature parity yet in the new Mendeley Reference Manager, we are working on it.

Want to know more about what’s new at Mendeley?  You can watch the Advisor Briefing webinar here.

And here are a few more useful links:

Download the Reference Manager Beta

Give us feedback on the format of the Advisor Briefing

Want to know more about Advisors or apply to be one?  Visit us here.

Why we (need to) celebrate Ada Lovelace Day

img_6531-mobile-product-manager

Happy Ada Lovelace Day! It’s been seven years since it was founded by Suw Charman-Anderson. While that is an eternity in the tech world (think how many new iPhones have been released since!), there are things that move more slowly in tech than an app release schedule.

Our Mendeley Mobile Apps Product Manager shares her thoughts on why we still need to celebrate Ada Lovelace, and by association, all women in STEM.

A little history

Before we discuss why we still (should) celebrate Ada Lovelace day, let’s first look at who was Ada Lovelace.

Ada became countess of Lovelace through marriage, but before that she was educated in mathematics and logic. This was unusual for girls in her time, but her mother promoted her interests in these subjects. Through her interest in math, she met Charles Babbage, known as the ‘father of computers’. In the early 1840s, Ada wrote a set of notes on Babbage’s Analytical Engine, which were later recognised as being the first algorithm to be carried out by a machine. As such, she is known as the world’s first computer programmer. Not just the world’s first female programmer (how she is often referred), but the first programmer. Full stop.

In addition, her vision included the capability of computers going beyond just number-crunching, which is what many others including Babbage focused on at the time. She was a visionary beyond her time. She was also a woman, in a period where it was uncommon for even wealthy women to have enjoyed education that included mathematics or science. A more common pursuit for women in that time was to study more feminine subjects, such as music.

(Of course now we know there is a relationship between music and mathematics, and there are studies suggesting music can help with mathematics education.)

Today, women have far more opportunities than in Ada’s time. Though the gender ratio in technology and engineering is below 50-50, a considerable number of women work in tech these days. Yet, they are still under represented at tech conferences and in technology itself. Combine this with the varying statistics around salary disparities between men and women (in similar roles), and we are still facing different gaps that need to be closed.

Ada Lovelace Day is meant to bring awareness to great work done by women in STEM fields. Why? Because despite science education being available to girls and boys equally, we do not see the same number of men and women in these jobs. There are various unconscious biases we all have, and each of them may contribute to this disparity.

Computer Science as “Women’s work”?

History rarely goes in a straight line, and when it comes to women in tech, there have been a few interesting detours. Today, you imagine the typical dev team to be mostly men. The pendulum swung another way once upon a time. In the 1940s women were hired to work on the ENIAC machine, one of the world’s first computer. By the 1960s, Cosmopolitan magazine published an article showcasing “Computer Girls” and programming as a great career option for women. In fact, programming was considered a mostly feminine endeavour. Unfortunately, not for the right reasons. Employers expected programming to be low-skilled clerical work similar to typing and filing. The Cosmopolitan article even refers to it being akin to “planning a dinner party”. Developing hardware was considered the more difficult, and thus masculine, aspect of computers. Nonetheless, women continued to be hired even as the industry started to change and become more biased towards men, simply because there was such a demand for programmers.

Changing the discussion

The fact that we still need reminders about bias in STEM jobs favoring men over women says the discussion on this topic is far from done. Although it is definitely a gender discussion, it is also one of ability. I’d like to suggest a challenge and a change of perspective in that discussion. Perhaps if we stop thinking of classically STEM fields as “hard” versus for example the arts as “easy/easier”, or specifically feminine/masculine, then we may change the discussion for the next generations. I remember growing up being told that “Math is for boys”. Followed by “Math is hard”. It is universally known that our culture and societal expectations greatly influence our career choices. Ada Lovelace pursued math at a time when it was highly unusual for women. There is no way to know if and how much resistance she was met with along the way. We do know her family was well off, which certainly helped her in her studies and scientific pursuits.

The discussion should really not be about gender at all, even if today we focus on women’s achievements in STEM. Instead, let’s start opening up the conversation to say nursing and teaching are great careers for boys, and studying physics is just as exciting as linguistics. Then perhaps we do not only see more women in STEM fields, but more men in the arts and social sciences. When we are all pursuing careers where we can make a difference, and careers we love, these fields become a better place for everyone, regardless of gender.

Christine Buske received an HBSc in Biotechnology & Economics, and a PhD in Behavioral Neuroscience, from the University of Toronto. Since completing her PhD, she has left academia for a career in technology and loves all things mobile. You follow her on Twitter. Have you checked out the Mendeley mobile apps yet?  Mendeley is available on both iOS and Android.

 

 

 

Mendeley Bootcamp for German-speaking researchers

MENDELEY BOOTCAMP 2016

All scientists have one thing in common: The passion for our research. But growing requirements require fast and efficient cooperation, access to literature from anywhere, timely synchronization of laboratory results and to be in contact with other researchers worldwide. That sounds like a challenge, right? No more! With Mendeley you can easily optimize your everyday work and devote your time what actually really matters: your research.

Developed by scientists for scientists, Mendeley connects you worldwide with 6+ million users.

Join Mendeley Bootcamp 2016 for German speaking. An exclusive webinar series aimed to German speaking researchers focused on how Mendeley can help you manage your references, understand the impact of your research and showcase your work.

The webinar series will cover the use of Mendeley as:

* A powerful Reference Management Tool to Store, read, annotate and cite literature both individually and collaboratively anywhere on any device.

* A Scholarly Collaboration Network with a global community of 6+ mill researchers across all scientific disciplines to connect, collaborate and showcase their work.

* A personal analytics dashboard enabling researchers to evaluate the performance and societal impact of their publications via a concise and comprehensive collection of key performance metrics.

* A discovery tool with personalised Recommenders, Alerts, and media updates, enabling researchers to stay up to date in their fields.

* A data repository to securely store datasets online so they can be cited and shared.

BOOTCAMP SCHEDULE

Screen Shot 2016-10-07 at 12.39.11.png

Register now!
https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/RR7VP8G