guest blog  Getting Grant Funding for Your Startup

Jan Reichelt, Co-founder and President of Mendeley, talks about his experience of using grants from funding bodies such as EUREKA and the Technology Strategy Board to help grow the company.

guest blog  Getting Grant Funding for Your Startup

By: Elitsa Dermendzhiyska, Co-founder of Grant Central

Is there such a thing as a free lunch when it comes to startup funding? That’s the question hanging in the air as I sit down with Jan Reichelt, co-founder of Mendeley, a research collaboration platform boasting over 3 million users and touted as one of the startups most likey to change the world for the better. If anyone had the answer, that would be Jan: on top of a Series A funding and acquisition by Reed Elsevier, over the past 6 years Mendeley has won a slew of national and EU grants whose precise number Jan seems to have lost track of.

Equity-free money in the form of grants holds a special allure for bootstrapped, cash-starved startup founders – an allure Jan is quick to dispel. Grants are like a sweetener, he says. They are nice to have, but startups shouldn’t count on them. Even if you get one, the money can be slow to come in, so you need to have other funding sources ready at hand.

Back in 2008, when Mendeley applied for the EUREKA Eurostars grant scheme, the startup had already secured seed funding and was eyeing VC investment to develop its research collaboration platform. The grant wouldn’t make or break Jan’s vision; rather, it just turned out to be the right fit at the right time.

Jan wouldn’t recommend the grant route for most startups, invoking the somewhat laborious process of obtaining and managing the funds. The amount of time you have to dedicate to writing the application through to forming a partnership to reporting and monitoring the project is only justified if you can find the right fit between your goals and the purpose of the grant, he says.

Grants such as the ones offered by Eurostars exist for two main reasons: to encourage research or to facilitate collaboration between academia and businesses. Mendeley fit both requirements, as the startup was looking to engage with academic experts in crowdsourcing and modern semantic technologies in order to provide real-time impact analysis for its platform users.

With the grant, the startup was able to create a win-win consortium by partnering with the Estonian Technology Competence Centre in Electronics-, Info- and Communication Technologies (ELIKO) and Austria’s Competence Centre for Knowledge Management (Know-Center).

Besides fit, another consideration businesses need to keep in mind is the rigidity of most EU grant schemes vis-a-vis VC funding. Grant applications often call for specific development plans and growth projections over 2 to 4 years down the line – something almost unthinkable for startups used to changing direction (or “pivoting”) on the go. A grant entails pre-committing to a certain course of action and any later changes, while possible, require reasonable justification and official permission from the government funders. A helpful strategy, Jan offers, is to make up a story and define your roadmap broadly enough to leave room for flexibility.

Grants require founders to maintain constant communication, as rules call for regular financial and technical reports to keep the funding authorities apprised of any progress, delays and changes to the project. Consortium agreements and allocation of responsibilities among partners also come with their own set of communication challenges. One example is deciding who would own the IP developed, – an issue that can become tricky if there are two or more commercial partners involved. Further still, aligning academic and business needs may require careful treading – or what Jan aptly describes as “hand holding” – in order to keep the theoretically appealing in line with the practical commercial realities.

Grant funding can appear rather rigorous to founders tied in the day-to-day running of business, and Jan, who tackled the initial Eurostars application by himself, concedes that the initial learning curve can be steep. Apart from hammering out a comprehensive application, he needed to then setup solid management and reporting processes in the post-grant period. And yet grants, while no free lunch, offer an opportunity for startups to grow on their own terms if they can muster the management skill, clear vision and R&D potential.

Have you had any experience of applying for similar grants? Share them with us in the comments!

academic features  A look at Mendeley Readership Statistics

By See Wah Cheng, Product Manager at Mendeley

We live in an age where knowledge dissemination happens at an incredible speed, researchers are always looking for ways to evaluate new discovery. Mendeley’s vision has always been to accelerate research, and by crowdsourcing readership statistics, we provide a new way for you to look at the impact of research articles.

What is Mendeley Readership?

Mendeley Readership is one measure of how researchers engage with research on Mendeley. Simply put, it is the number of Mendeley users who have added a particular article into their personal library. You can see this number on the article pages on our Research Catalog. Furthermore, based on our anonymised aggregated statistics, we can provide demographic insights such as geographical info, discipline and academic status of readers.

How does it compare with traditional metrics?

Mendeley Readership is a measure which complements traditional bibliometrics such as citation counts by showing an early indicator of the impact a work has, both on other authors within the same field as the work’s author as well as non-authors such as clinicians, policymakers, funders, and interested members of the public. Additionally, some early research into the relationship of Mendeley readership with traditional citations has found evidence supporting that Mendeley readership counts correlate moderately with future citations. If you are interested in digging deeper into the existing research on the meaning of Mendeley readership, we suggest starting with “Do altmetrics work? Twitter and ten other social web services” (Thelwall, Haustein, Larivière, & Sugimoto, 2013), and also looking at a more recent research study (Zahedi, Costas, & Wouters, 2014) from CWTS, Leiden University. A more comprehensive listing of research related to Mendeley readership statistics can also be found in the altmetrics group on Mendeley. Scholarly Activity, including Mendeley Activity, has recently been endorsed by the Snowball Metrics initiative as part of their global standards for institutional benchmarking.

Our API

Mendeley believes in open data. Via our API, researchers and developers around the world can gain access to Mendeley Activity, including Readership Statistics. Scopus, the world’s largest citation database, has recently added Mendeley Activity to their article pages, and our data is used by all of the leading altmetrics services, including ImpactStory, Plum Analytics, and Altmetric.com. Visit our Developer Portal for more info.

We are constantly improving our service. For example, we have made all demographic insights available (instead of just the top 3 disciplines as was previously the case), in addition to data on countries and academic statuses. Future work will further refine the data we make available to include more detail on how researchers are engaging with research on Mendeley.

Join the Conversation 

Finally, if you are interested in the topic of altmetrics, why not go along to 1am:London 2014, taking place on the 25th and the 26th of September 2014? We might see you there!

events 2  Cambridge Union Society Debates Right to be Forgotten

In May 2014, the European Court of Justice ruling saw Google and other search engines receiving thousands of requests to remove links to certain content deemed damaging to individuals. Sir Jimmy Wales from the Wikimedia Foundation is amongst those that have spoken out at length against the ruling. In the company’s first transparency report, it posted Google’s Removal Notices, something that Wales describes as akin to “removing the index from a book”.

As things stand, in Europe people have the right to request such removals if content relating to them is inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant or excessive in the light of elapsed time. However, apart from serious concerns raised with regards to self-censorship, it is argued that the Right to be Forgotten is actually a false promise, since the information itself is not corrected, but links to it are “silently deleted,” prompting outcries against lack of transparency and breach of public interest.

This is clearly a very complex issue, which impacts all areas of modern society, including academic research. One example would be if only the latest version of research papers were made available because certain information contained within them was deemed “inadequate” or “irrelevant”. This could potentially leave researchers unable to place current research into broader context, and different, less proven theories and perspectives within scientific debates could be excluded, leading to narrowed perspectives and possibly damaging the integrity of studies conducted within those filtered conditions.

It is, however, crucial to safeguard privacy and individual rights, but what is the best way of providing those mechanisms without causing broader infringements upon collective rights to information? The Cambridge Union Society, which is celebrating its 200th year of tradition in debating difficult topics, is now stepping up to tackle this thorny issue head on.

Mendeley is sponsoring this debate on the 23rd October 2014, which hopefully will spark some lively discussion and offer useful insights. Jan Reichelt, Co-founder and president of Mendeley will be opening up proceedings by addressing the assembly and Gabriel Hughes, who has a long tradition of working with Big Data and Analytics in companies like Google, Elsevier, and now Mendeley will give his personal perspective on some possible solutions. He will be joining other prominent speakers who will argue both sides of the issue.

The full line-up will be announced shortly and the event will also be live streamed. To be kept up-to-date with the latest and join the discussion make sure to join the Mendeley Right to be Forgotten group, and follow @mendeley_com @gabehughes or @alicebonasio on Twitter.

 

guest blog  Crowdfunding brings clubfoot treatment to children in the developing world

This Mendeley guest post talks about how a crowdfunding campaign is bringing an innovative research design from Stanford University to children in developing countries struggling with clubfoot.

By Janeen B. Gingrich, MSW, Associate Director of Philanthropy, miraclefeet

When I first heard about miraclefeet and clubfoot, I felt compelled to get involved. I had done a lot of work towards ending social problems in the US, many of which felt unsolvable, and I had seen untreated clubfoot growing up in Thailand. But now that I was a new mom, this issue really resonated with me even more. Why? Because untreated clubfoot is a problem that can be solved. Once you start talking to more people about it, you wouldn’t believe how common it is. Clubfoot affects one out of every 750 children worldwide, making it one of the most common birth defects in the world. Yet it is one most people might not even be aware of.  In the US, Europe and the UK, it is usually detected in utero and treated without surgery shortly after birth, allowing the child to live a healthy, active lifestyle. In fact, Mia Hamm, Kristi Yamaguchi, Steven Gerrard and Troy Aikman – all very successful athletes – were born with clubfoot and received proper treatment.

guest blog  Crowdfunding brings clubfoot treatment to children in the developing world

In contrast, 80% of children born with clubfoot in the rest of the world have no access to treatment. A treatment that, from start to finish, costs an average of $250 total.

Unfortunately, children, and then of course, adults, living with untreated clubfoot face incredible hurdles their whole lives. Often they are shunned from society – left alone and hidden away as youngsters because the family is ashamed. Because walking is so difficult, they are usually unable to attend school. These children are subject to higher risk of neglect, poverty, physical and sexual abuse.  They might end up begging or working unsafe jobs and facing a life of discrimination and pain. Below is a photo of a young father in India who lives with untreated clubfoot (on left) and his son Pradeep, who was also born with clubfoot, but is being treated in a miraclefeet-supported clinic.

guest blog  Crowdfunding brings clubfoot treatment to children in the developing world

The miraclefeet brace is a low-cost ($20) foot abduction brace developed at the Stanford d.school through the Design for Extreme Affordability course, in collaboration with miraclefeet, Clarks Shoes and Suncast, to treat clubfoot using the non-surgical Ponseti method. Brace compliance is the most important variable in achieving a good treatment outcome: corrected feet and the ability to walk, run and play as any child should be able to.

The lightweight, child-friendly design includes easy-on, easy-off accessibility through detachable shoes and built-in stability for standing and walking.

Bracing has been one of the biggest hurdles in scaling up Ponseti treatment globally.  Having an off-the-shelf, inexpensive foot abduction brace keeps the cost of treatment low. Over a ten-year period, this brace could enable as many as 1.6 million children to live active  and productive lives for a relatively small investment. 

You can check out and support the miraclefeet campaign here If you have any experience of using crowdfunding for research or are interested in the subject, make sure to join the discussion in our Mendeley Crowdfunding Group

api  New Android Kit Released for Mendeley API

We have been very busy at Mendeley looking at how to improve the Developer Experience for the community that builds cool stuff on the Mendeley API.

For those who don’t know, API stands for Application Programming Interface and it’s what allows your product to talk to other products, opening up your data and functionality to outside developers.

api  New Android Kit Released for Mendeley API

So far we have well over 100 active clients developing with the Mendeley API, which is not too shabby. These include Android and Kindle clients like Scholarley and KinSync, Altmetric, which tracks what people are saying about papers online, and Labfolder, an app that helps researchers organise their protocols and data.

api  New Android Kit Released for Mendeley API

We want developers to make A LOT more apps for Mendeley though, so we listened to feedback and put together a new and much improved API and sleek Developer Portal, where we’re now collating a whole bunch of tools and resources to support our developer community.

api  New Android Kit Released for Mendeley API

We also have a growing API Team at Mendeley including Joyce Stack, who’s dedicated to Developer Outreach. If you’re wondering what exactly that is, here’s some first-hand insight on what her job is like. Just don’t call her an Evangelist, she hates that…

The latest step in this journey was to release an SDK (That’s Software Development Kit to you and me) to make things simpler for Android developers wanting to work with Mendeley. An early public access version is now available on GitHub which provides model objects and packages and takes care of authentication.

We’ll of course be looking to improve the API  because, as any good geek knows, no code is ever finished and we know there’s a long way to go! With that in mind please send us your feedback. You can email api@mendeley.com and reach out to @mendeleyAPI on Twitter.

For  all the latest news on the API and Developer Tools, also be sure to follow the Mendeley API Blog

events 2 elsevier  Finding Better Ways of Mining Scientific Publications

Mendeley is supporting the 3rd edition of the International Workshop on Mining Scientific Publications, which will take place on the 12th September 2014 in London. The event will bring together researchers and practitioners from across industry, government, digital libraries and academia to address the latest challenges in the field of mining data from scientific publications.

Kris Jack, Chief Data Scientist at Mendeley, is part of the organizing Committee, which also includes The Open University and The European Library. Following a very successful call for papers, he is now looking forward to a very busy and productive day of presentations and discussions:

“We’ve had a record number of high-quality submissions this year, so were really spoiled for choice in putting together the agenda, which combines long papers, short papers, demonstrations and various presentations. We also worked with Elsevier to engage directly with the research community, which is really fantastic.”

As part of that ongoing outreach, Gemma Hersh, Policy Director at Elsevier, will be giving a brief presentation and answering questions from the participants regarding the company’s recently updated Text and Data Mining policy, and how it can best support the evolving needs of the research community.

As in previous years, this workshop is run in conjunction with the Digital Libraries conference – DL 2014 – and participants can register on the City University London website to attend the entire conference or just the workshops/tutorials.

See the full programme below, and for the latest updates be sure to follow @WOSP2014  or send any questions to @_krisjack or @alicebonasio on Twitter

 

PROGRAM

09:00-09:10

Introduction

09:10-09:45

Keynote talk

Information Extraction and Data Mining for Scholarly Big Data

Dr. C. Lee Giles

09:45-10:10

Long paper

A Comparison of two Unsupervised Table Recognition Methods from Digital Scientific Articles

Stefan Klampfl, Kris Jack and Roman Kern

10:10-10:30

Short paper

A Keyquery-Based Classification System for CORE

Michael Völske, Tim Gollub, Matthias Hagen and Benno Stein

10:30-10:50

Short paper

Discovering and visualizing interdisciplinary content classes in scientific publications

Theodoros Giannakopoulos, Ioannis Foufoulas, Eleftherios Stamatogiannakis, Harry Dimitropoulos, Natalia Manola and Yannis Ioannidis

10:50-11:10

Break

11:10-11:35

Long paper

Efficient blocking method for a large scale citation matching

Mateusz Fedoryszak and Łukasz Bolikowski

11:35-12:00

Long paper

Extracting Textual Descriptions of Mathematical Expressions in Scientific Papers

Giovanni Yoko Kristianto, Goran Topic and Akiko Aizawa

12:00-12:20

Short paper

Towards a Marketplace for the Scientific Community: Accessing Knowledge from the Computer Science Domain

Mark Kröll, Stefan Klampfl and Roman Kern

12:20-12:40

Short paper

Experiments on Rating Conferences with CORE and DBLP

Irvan Jahja, Suhendry Effendy and Roland Yap

12:40-13:00

Short paper

A new semantic similarity based measure for assessing research contribution

Petr Knoth and Drahomira Herrmannova

13:00-13:10

Presentation

Elsevier’s Text and Data Mining Policy

Gemma Hersh

13:10-14:00

Lunch

14:00-14:35

Keynote talk

Developing benchmark datasets of scholarly documents and investigating the use of anchor text physics retrieval

Birger Larsen

14:35-14:50

Demo paper

AMI-diagram: Mining Facts from Images

Peter Murray-Rust, Richard Smith-Unna and Ross Mounce

14:50-15:05

Demo paper

Annota: Towards Enriching Scientific Publications with Semantics and User Annotations

Michal Holub, Róbert Móro, Jakub Ševcech, Martin Lipták and Maria Bielikova

15:05-15:20

Demo paper

The ContentMine scraping stack: literature-scale content mining with community maintained collections of declarative scrapers

Richard Smith-Unna and Peter Murray-Rust

15:20-15:35

Break

15:35-16:00

Long paper

GROTOAP2 – The methodology of creating a large ground truth dataset of scientific articles

Dominika Tkaczyk, Pawel Szostek and Lukasz Bolikowski

16:00-16:25

Long paper

The Architecture and Datasets of Docear’s Research Paper Recommender System

Joeran Beel, Stefan Langer, Bela Gipp, and Andreas Nürnberger

16:25-16:50

Long paper

Social, Political and Legal Aspects of Text and Data Mining

Michelle Brook, Peter Murray-Rust and Charles Oppenheim

16:50-17:00

Closing

 

guest blog  Improving Long term Healthcare with Crowdfunded Community Partnership

Collaboration and community are at the heart of bringing research to life in ways that make a real difference to people’s lives, specially when it comes to advances in healthcare. So this time we give a shout out to an interesting crowdfunding project that was launched yesterday to try and do just that:

By Chaitenya Razdan, Co-Founder and CEO, Care + Wear

Everyone has had a close friend or family member undergo some type of medical treatment and witnessed just how taxing it is; lives are completely altered for both the patient and their caretakers. Having experienced it first hand, Susan, Caroline and I combined our backgrounds to create a functional and fashionable treatment accessory that provides protection while increasing comfort during treatment.  We began with a simple concept for patients with PICC lines – the Band.

Through the development of the Band, Care + Wear was born.

PICC lines (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters) are used to administer long-term intravenous medications like chemotherapy, IV antibiotics, and TPN nutrition. Today, over 6 million are inserted annually and this number is growing quickly.

We knew that if we were going to reach as many patients as possible we would need to inspire a community effort.   First, we put together an experienced advisory board consisting of doctors, nurses, strategic growth and marketing professionals and successful entrepreneurs who have each dedicated countless hours to helping build Care + Wear. Then, we reached out to the industry’s leading foundations and now proudly call the American Cancer Society, F Cancer and the Tyler Robinson Foundation partners.

We have made significant progress since the Band was developed this Spring thanks to our advisors, partner foundations and most importantly the patients.  We’ve heard countless stories of how the Band would have, and could improve a patient’s journey through long-term medical care.  We are more inspired to bring our dream to life every day.

But in order to bring the Band to life, we needed a platform to reach more patients around the country, their friends and family, caretakers, nurses, doctors and colleagues and to spread the word. We not only want people to know that there is a product out there but also want to raise awareness for the community as a whole.

Crowdfunding gives Care + Wear an avenue to spread awareness to those living with PICC lines and their own communities. We have been overwhelmed with the excitement around the Band and are looking forward to making a difference.

Today we are proud to announce the official launch of Care + Wear. With cutting-edge designs and features, we hope to be able to help comfort, protect and inspire patients with fashionable medical accessories that also help support our foundation partners.

All the funds pledged will help us manufacture and distribute the first Bands to hospitals and patients, with a portion being donated to our foundation partners. Visit our Indiegogo campaign page to support us!

Receiving long-term medical treatments is an arduous process that often can be debilitating and leave you weak and without hope. It’s about time that we did something to help patients and their families. So join us, this is only the beginning.

If you’re interested in the subject, make sure to join our Crowdfunding Group on Mendeley and let us know what you think!

Keeping science open has always been part of Mendeley’s mission. There are many ways we achieve this, but our developer portal throws opens the Mendeley platform for developers to create and build tools to make researchers’ lives easier using Application Programming Interfaces — known as APIs. It is thanks to the Mendeley API that some of your favorite Mendeley third-party apps exist, like KinSync, PaperShip and Scholarley, to name a few. Even higher education is getting into the API game.

And now our API website has a fresh new look and a beta release. The team is currently working with a technical writer to improve the documentation, and are also busy trying to get SDKs out for mobile and other languages for a major release sometime later this year.

Think you’re ready to hack? Know any code monkeys interested in building tools to make researchers’ lives easier? Visit our Dev Portal to learn more and follow our brand-new Mendeley API blog. And meet the team behind the API in this months’ “Meet the Mendeley Team.”

start up life mendelife meettheteam  Meet the API Team!

 

Joyce Stack – Developer Outreach

start up life mendelife meettheteam  Meet the API Team!Joyce Stack completed a BSc. (Hons) Computer Science from The Open University while working in a startup in Co. Cork, Ireland. She moved to London in 2005 to join one of the City’s leading exponents of agile techniques at that time to work as a Java Developer. She is now working in the Developer Outreach role in Mendeley.
Connect with her on Twitter @MendeleyStack

How do you describe your role on the API Team?

Mainly my role is to be the “physical manifestation” of the API at conferences, meetups and hackathons.

Also, my role is to ensure we are engaging with all our clients and potential clients on the main social channels e.g. Twitter, Stack Overflow, blogs, etc.

My main responsibilities are to build up an excellent developer experience and support people in building great apps and demonstrating the value of our dataset to new potential clients. Basically, engaging with our developer community to drive adoption. Also, I’m the conduit between clients, both internal and external into the platform team and product teams, from an API perspective.

What is your favourite part about working for Mendeley?

I get fed a lot. There is always a fridge full of food, ice-cream, fruit and drinks.

Primarily, though I was never one for endless iterations of work, I like the variety in this role. I get to wear many hats, e.g. product owner, support person, coder, debugger, marketing, blogger.

What do you enjoy doing in your free time?
Take trips away to new places (8 so far this year), drinking brown beer and keeping fit with boxercise, spinning and weights.

Matt Thomson – Senior Software Developer

start up life mendelife meettheteam  Meet the API Team!Matt was born and grew up in Scunthorpe in the North of England. After graduating with an MMath from the University of Cambridge, he moved to London to join a telecommunications software provider, before joining the platform team at Mendeley in 2012.

How do you describe your role on the API Team?

I’m one of the developers of the Mendeley API, responsible for building new features, keeping the API running smoothly, and making sure that it meets the needs of all of our client developers, both internally and externally.

What is your favourite part about working for Mendeley?

The problems are challenging, our technology stack is exciting, and the people are friendly and supportive. I bet everyone says “the people”, though.

What do you enjoy doing in your free time?

I’m a big fan of live comedy, and performed improvised comedy for a number of years, most notably at the Edinburgh Fringe with London’s (now defunct) Fat Kitten Improv. I also enjoy exploring London’s green spaces and pubs, and am a long-suffering follower of Scunthorpe United.

Dr David Ingram —Principal Engineer

David’s background is a mix between working in the computer industry and academia — he has a PhD in operating systems, did post doc research in distributed systems, and worked for both AT&T Labs and Google.

How do you describe your role on the API Team?start up life mendelife meettheteam  Meet the API Team!

My role is currently to look at the API both from within and from external client perspectives. I try to make sure the most important client needs are met while keeping the implementation clean and maintainable.

What is your favourite part about working for Mendeley?

The best thing about Mendeley is our goal, to improve the productivity of researchers everywhere.

What do you enjoy doing in your free time?

In my free time when I’m not hacking, I teach dance.

Congratulations and thank you to Vicky Pyne!

Vicky recently participated in a video for our Women in STEM series (you can see these stories on our YouTube channel, including some of our own Mendeley employees), and we loved her passion for the topic, both as a medical student and someone with a decade of experience of working for technology companies.

Luckily for us, she has the same passion for Mendeley!

Vicky is in her final year of medical school at the University of Bristol. “My major research days are still ahead of me,” said Vicky, who has already done several projects throughout her university career, including looking at the efficacy of bariatric surgery, the aetiology and management of a rare obstetric condition called ‘Chronic Histiocytic Intervillositis,’ and a ‘big data’ study on the performance of mature medical students as they become mature junior doctors.

 

mendeley advisors community relations advisor of the month  Congrats August Advisor of the Month — Vicky Pyne!

How long have you been on Mendeley?
Since my second year [of medical school] in 2011.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?
EndNote and the inbuilt MS Word References tool.

How does Mendeley influence your research?
Mendeley speeds up my research by allowing me to quickly save papers to a place where I can easily find them in the future.

It’s also made a huge difference in terms of creation of my references as well – this used to be such a headache and wasted a lot of time that could be have been spent doing more useful things to improve the quality of my work.

It’s a more subtle change but I think it’s also allowed me to review more papers simultaneously to truly integrate their messages into my own work in a way that just having the files stored on my hard-drive wouldn’t give me. Finally, I imagine its saved my printing costs as well as there’s no need to print and manually highlight stuff!

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?
When I first found the tool, it took almost no time to realise that this was going to be really useful. I thought it’d be good to be more involved in it and it’s nice to get the ‘Pro’ features for free!

How have you been spreading the word about Mendeley?
I share the link on the Facebook group for my year and always point it out to friends when our big yearly projects come around. I offer support to anyone who’s having problems – although they rarely need it!

What book are you reading at the moment and why?
I’m currently reading “The Book Thief” by Markus Zusak. For most of the academic year, I don’t get much chance to read for pleasure but I like to get into some books when the summer holidays come around.

Any fun fact people might be surprised to learn about you?
I started dancing at the age of 3 and almost went to stage school at the age of 11. I sometimes wonder how different my life would have been if I’d gone down that route instead!

What is the best part about being a researcher?
You find yourself asking a question and you are able to go and find out the answer – sometimes it’s rather surprising and just creates a whole set of new questions. Learning and exploring is what life is all about!

And the worst?
It can be frustrating when you can’t access a paper you need as it’s behind a paywall – I understand that journals need to make money to survive but it feels there should be another way to do this that doesn’t hinder further research.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?
That it just works. It’s simple to use and I can trust it completely. I’m not wasting time trying to learn a tool when I should be learning about my field of study.

We’re very pleased to announce that Mendeley Desktop 1.12 is now available, and will appearing as an auto-update for all users over the next couple of days.  This release resolves two popular user requests, as well as numerous bug fixes.

Print PDFs from Mendeley Desktop

Printing has been our #2 user request for some time (second to an Android app, which is currently in progress), so it’s great to be able to deliver.  To print a PDF, simply open it in a Mendeley reader tab, select the “File” menu at the top, and click “Print…” or press CTRL+P (CMD+P on MacOS).

new release 2  Mendeley Desktop 1.12 Available Now

From there, you have some standard print options, and the option to include or exclude your annotations.  When you include annotations, sticky notes will have a marker to the side of the document, with the full note text appended to the end of the document, in the same format that our “Export PDF with annotations” feature uses currently.

new release 2  Mendeley Desktop 1.12 Available Now

Mark as read

Automatically marking documents as read was previously quite aggressive in Mendeley Desktop.  If you opened a PDF in a tab, it was marked as read instantly.  This meant that it wasn’t a very accurate indicator of whether a document had actually been “read” or not, only opened.  We had a lot of feedback related to this, and have redesigned this system in an attempt to make it a little bit smarter.

Now the document is only marked as read once it has been scrolled most of the way through and has been opened for a reasonable period of time, dependent on the length of the document.  Without interfacing with your brain, we can’t actually check whether you’ve read a document or not, so in the case where this doesn’t quite catch something, you can still change the read/unread status of a document manually by toggling the read/unread dot.

new release 2  Mendeley Desktop 1.12 Available Now

With this change made, we feel comfortable adding read/unread support to our Mobile and web applications in the near future also.

What’s next?

The majority of our time recently has been spent supporting a company-wide migration away from numerous private APIs and services, to having all our apps communicate and sync using our new public API (currently in beta).  This is an absolutely huge piece of work, but when it’s done and stabilised, will result in a much faster and more stable base for us to iterate on and bring you value faster.  We are expecting to start rolling out this new version around September/October.

Before then though, we’ll be doing a small release with some fixes to the citation plugins, and the ability to import MEDLINE files from PubMed.  This has been another long-standing request for people who need to do systematic literature reviews across hundreds or even thousands of PubMed articles at a time.

If you’re interested in helping us test new features, you can opt-in to experimental releases via the “Help” menu in Mendeley Desktop. (you can opt out at any time to return to the last stable release).  Please report any issues you find to support@mendeley.com

Thanks a lot.