Meet the Team- Sahil Sennik

Name: Sahil Sennik

Job title: L2 Service desk specialist

sahilIntro bio: The best way to describe myself would be pretty nerdy.  I enjoy playing around with technology, whether it be consistently specing my PC or making my home as smart as possible with sensors triggering coloured light bulbs to turn my room into a disco or EDM night club!  In my opinion, there’s nothing better to come home to.  Aside from that, I am a huge football fan and support Arsenal.  Come on you gunners!

 

When did you join Mendeley?  I joined Mendeley October 2016

What do you love most about your job? I really enjoy being a liaison between our customers and developers.  The way I see it, it’s a two-way street – on one hand, getting those really annoying or experience damaging bugs fixed and seeing our users enjoy the product and seamlessly use it is always a win.  On the other hand, delivering positive feedback and constructive criticism to our developers always helps us learn and grow stronger.  Being a part of that is invaluable.

What book did you most recently read? Cat and Mouse by James Patterson.  My favourite of the Alex Cross series so far!

What’s one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?  I don’t just see Mendeley as a reference management software.  It is an extremely powerful collaboration tool too.  As someone who may just want to meet people in the Scientific/research community, publish their work, or be part of a group where you can share ideas, Mendeley caters to that extremely well.  In summary, think of Mendeleyans as one huge family, where you can meet so many like-minded people and be a part of such a great community.

How would you explain your job to a stranger on a bus? Quite simply put – My job is to ensure your issues are mine.  You have a problem with the product I represent and I will do whatever I can to get it fixed, even if it takes days weeks or months.  It may be technical or something as simple as a spelling mistake.  If it bugs you, it bugs me, and therefore, it will bug our developers!

What’s the most exciting part of your job? It may seem quite trivial, but I’d have to say my weekly team meetings.  This is a meeting all about us and how we can help each other help our customers as effectively as possible.  The brainstorming and discussions held during the meetings really motivate me to start working on ideas as soon as possible.  Seeing them succeed and witnessing the positive outcomes really keeps me driven.

What keeps you awake at night? Cliffhangers from my favourite shows.  Why must we suffer this way!

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?  I recently helped one of my closest friends find a job after almost three months without one.  The whole experience really showed me how even the slightest intervention in a person’s life can mean the world to them.

 

Become a Mendeley Advisor!

advisors
Students at the University of State of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ) who attended a workshop lead by Carlos Filomeno, Mendeley Advisor

If you are a Mendeley lover who wants to share the benefits of good reference management and the value of Mendeley groups, now’s your chance. We are expanding the Mendeley Advisor community and we’d love to have you join us!

Thousands of your peers around the world have already become Mendeley Advisors and helped us the get the word about Mendeley out on their campuses.  The Mendeley Advisors serve as the Mendeley representative on campus and help us keep the user community thriving.

What Mendeley Advisors do:

They spread the word about Mendeley and good reference management in any way that makes sense. Here are some of the things that our current Advisors do:

  • Put up posters in the library, their offices and the student centre
  • Run informal one-on-one trainings
  • Host Mendeley drop in sessions through the library
  • Run Mendeley workshops
  • Include Mendeley in their curriculum
  • Wear Mendeley t-shirts
  • Post about Mendeley on social media like YouTube or Twitter
  • Anything else you can think of!

Essentially, Mendeley Advisors are our hands on the ground, helping potential users connect with the platform. We also consult with Advisors to understand the needs of users and to beta test new features.  You’re the first group of users we consult when we are considering adding a new functionality to the product.

But the Mendeley Advisor program isn’t just making Mendeley famous—there are also  some nice perks for you:

  • Be the Mendeley representative on your campus (a nice thing to add to your CV)
  • Get a special Mendeley Advisor account with more groups and increased storage
  • Connect with the team behind Mendeley
  • Be the first to know what we are working on and get early access to new features
  • Get access to the exclusive Mendeley Advisor forum
  • Receive free Mendeley giveaways for events
  • And most importantly: a flashy Advisor badge for your Mendeley profile so the whole world can see you’re a Mendeley guru!

Want to learn more about Advisors?  Read our Advisor of the Month column or apply on our Mendeley Advisor webpage.

Have questions?  Reach out to Daniel and Rachel from the Community Team at community@mendeley.com.

Meet the Team: Matt Stratford

Name: Matt Stratfordmatt

Job title: Senior Product Manager

Intro bio

I’ve had rather a lot of jobs, from teacher to barista to salesperson to conference organizer. I found a way into technology and that led to consulting and from there I was able to make a start in product management.

When did you join Mendeley?

I worked on account for Mendeley from May 2015, but I liked it so much I joined as a full-time employee in September 2016.

What do you love most about your job?

I love that product management is so wide-ranging in terms of what it demands you know about.

What book did you most recently read?

Usually, I have a small handful on the go at any one time. At the moment I’m on a user experience design kick. I finished UX for Lean Startups by Laura Klein last week and I’m part-way through Sprint by Jake Knapp. Away from work, I’ve just started The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses by Jesse Schell and I can tell already it’s going to be excellent.

What’s one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

I read all the feedback you send through the feedback widget on Mendeley Feed, even if I can’t respond to everything individually.

How would you explain your job to a stranger on a bus?

I work as part of a team which makes tools to help academic researchers discover and access information. My job is to identify problems that researchers have and to set the direction and priorities for the solution. But the thing about product management is that actually it involves a bit of everything. I talk regularly with customers and users, conduct user research, write software acceptance tests, evaluate web analytics, help out with interaction design, contribute to technology choices, support marketing campaigns, establish operations requirements, conduct analysis for business strategy… the list goes on! And the only way I can possibly do all this is to be super-organised and super-flexible and to invest lots of time in making day-to-day team processes work really effectively. It certainly keeps me busy!

What’s the most exciting part of your job?

I’m a pretty excitable person so there’s usually something most days that gives me some energy. But the most satisfying part of the job is when you hear first hand from someone that you’ve made their lives better by solving a problem they had. That feels worthwhile.

What keeps you awake at night?

Work doesn’t keep me up at night. I compartmentalize pretty well.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I learned that depending on how market demand is structured, it is theoretically possible that copyright holders profit from some levels of piracy. For instance, the existence of pirate copies of Microsoft Word helped it to become a de facto standard, which created more demand for legitimate purchases.

 

 

 

Meet the Team: Adrian Raudaschl

Name: Adrian Raudaschl

Job title: Product Manager

adrian

Intro bio (background): I originally trained and worked as a doctor in the NHS before transitioning into a product role for a medical start-up. My love of solving hard problems in the world of medicine and academia led me to my current role at Elsevier.

When did you join Mendeley? I joined in August 2017

What do you love most about your job? The opportunity to work with smart and talented individuals from a range of background on valuable problems in academia.

What book did you most recently read? Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

What’s the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley? Many people at Mendeley come from or are connected with people from academic backgrounds. We care deeply about the work we do here, and really want to help make things better in academia. This is not only limited to reference management, but also helping people find a job, build their professional network, discuss the latest research and store research data easily and securely. It is all part of a bigger picture of trying to make researcher lives better.

How would you explain your job to a stranger on a bus? I try to understand what the biggest pain points people are experiencing and build things to make their lives better. After defining what is important, it is about working with a team of engineers and designers to build out something which aims to solve the problems you have identified in the simplest way possible. If it works you iterate and make the solution better, if not we go back the drawing board and question our assumptions.

What’s the most exciting part of your job? Getting to meet and speak with academics about their profession and understanding their problems is a great part of my job. I also enjoy the challenge of taking a bunch of ideas and trying to work with my team on how best to apply our knowledge and resources to solve these problems. When it works well its incredibly satisfying.

What keeps you awake at night? Questioning myself that we are working on the most valuable problems for our users.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week? That we may be able to prevent cavities by colonising a genetically engineered variant of Streptococcus mutans. Interesting paper (https://www.mendeley.com/papers/modification-effector-strain-replacement-therapy-dental-caries-enable-clinical-safety-trials/).

 

Meet the team: Elizabeth Chesters

elizabeth chesters

Name: Elizabeth Chesters

Job title: UX Specialist

Intro bio (background): 

I’m Elizabeth, a user experience designer at Mendeley! My background is in Computer Science, and I’m a developer turned designer after studying Human-Computer Interaction. I’ve worked as both a developer and designer in a range of companies, moving from the agency and start-up life to in-house. Originally, I’m from the North of England, Manchester and have been braving London for the last 3 years.

When did you join Mendeley?

I joined Mendeley on the 18th December, 2017. It was definitely an interesting point of the year to join with most people on holiday!

What do you love most about your job?

I love the constant challenges of being a designer. There are so many ways to solve even the smallest of problems, which could actually have a huge impact on our users’ lives. Being a part of Mendeley, I’m beginning to understand the impact my design has on people’s lives and careers and how important my work is. I may not be finding a cure for cancer or training the next generation of ballerinas, but it feels amazing to be supporting those out there who are doing amazing work.

What book are you currently reading?

At the moment I’m studying how to be more inclusive with my designs, so, I’m reading A Web For everyone by Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery. It’s fascinating how much it expands your thinking. For example, designing for someone only capable of using your product with one hand, whether that be because of a permanent loss of limb, they’ve broken their arm or they’re a parent holding a child. Anyone can be impaired at any moment!

What’s one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

The feature I want people to know about is the Watched Folders feature. This is where can setup a folder on your computer to be ‘watched’, in your Mendeley settings. Mendeley then automatically syncs every document you put into the folder. This means you can download documents onto your machine and you don’t have to manually drag and drop everything into your Library.

How would you explain your job to a stranger on a bus?

I always explain my job as “making the web and technology less rubbish and more friendly for people.” I try to understand why people become frustrated because Alexa doesn’t understand them or discover how products should look at night when people are up late.

What’s the most exciting part of your job?

My users are probably the most exciting part of my job because of how varied they are. Working with new people every week keeps me on my toes. Every week we invite 8 users into the office, where we ask users to show us how they use Mendeley and gather feedback on our new products and designs. Each user has such unique research topics and intricate ways of using the same tool, which is fascinating to see.

What is your hidden talent?

I love learning languages and I can welcome and introduce myself in over 10 languages, including Arabic, British Sign Language, Sinhalese and Portuguese! My favourite part of coming into work in the morning is greeting each team member in their native language. People really appreciate the effort and it also helps break the ice when users come in for user research sessions.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

Every day I’m learning how screen readers work. Some screen readers actually pay attention to the visuals on the page. So, VoiceOver for Mac will group elements based on their visual style and if they look similar, like 5 words which look like 5 tags.

Meet the team: Daniel Christie

daniel christe

Daniel, residing in Philadelphia, PA is our main Mendeley Advisor Community contributor.  He brings a background in mechanical engineering & materials science research, and has been a long-time Mendeley user. We took some time with Daniel to find out what he loves about his job, and of course Mendeley!

How long have you been a researcher? 

I date my start in the research world from my high school days, so that works out to about 10 years. In that time I’ve gone from microfluidics, to drug delivery systems, to functional fabrics and other forms of 3D printed material systems to understand the way they deform and fail.

What excites you about serving the Mendeley Advisor Community? 

The energy & enthusiasm of a global group of researcher from all fields imaginable…there are fantastic discussions brewing in the community each and every day.

What book did you most recently read? 

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow…it’s a riveting, data-driven look at this amazing time we currently live in and what may lie ahead in our future.

What’s one thing you want people to know about Mendeley? 

That it’s an awesome research productivity tool – accessible wherever you are. Mendeley is a powerful way to not only annotate, organize, and cite reference – you can also share data and discover your next career opportunity.

How would you explain your current work to a stranger on a bus?

I blend my technical background with my passion for evidence-based learning strategies to help the world’s scientists and engineers work more productively and effectively.

What’s the most exciting part of your job?

I love traveling out to university campuses & conferences to show researchers new, slick ways of working with Mendeley. You might be surprised how many still don’t use reference managers, even in 2018…it totally transforms their world.

What keeps you awake at night?

Netflix. Otherwise, I sleep well most nights, so the saying doesn’t exactly work for me.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I come across plenty of interesting things every week I look for data points that point toward the future. One thing top-of-mind this week is that Tesla outsells Lexus and BMW, and is catching up to Mercedes quickly. That is impressive.

What do you think will be the next big discovery or development in your field? 

The tools that engineers use are becoming more intelligent and powerful by the day…from ideation to fabrication.  I think we’re on the cusp of an exciting era where we blend the best of human creativity with machine-partners to make us vastly more productive. For instance, true “computer-aided” design tools are coming online now. They leverage high performance computing algorithms to take problem descriptions and algorithmically synthesize thousands of potential designs that meet the goals and constraints, in the time it’d take an engineer to manually draw one design.