Insert references into your paper using Mendeley’s Web Library

You can now export references from your Mendeley Web Library into the Microsoft Word Citation Manager — without opening your Mendeley Desktop.

The export feature uses Microsoft Word’s built-in citation tool. This feature is only available on Windows for Word 2010 and above.

To export your references:

  1. Open your Mendeley Web Library
  2. Select the references you want to export
  3. Click on Export to MS Word, which will download an .xml file.
  4. Open Word and go to “References” and then “Manage Resources.”
  5. Browse your folder and select the .xml file. Your references will be available in Word’s Citation Manager.

mm_img_nl_201702_ms-word-citation-toolThe number of citation styles in Word are limited but you can install more styles from BibWord.
MS Word’s citation system is not the same system used by Mendeley Desktop. Using both on the same document will yield two sets of citations and two bibliographies.

Mendeley.com

Introducing the new Mendeley.com

Mendeley.com
The new Mendeley.com

It’s here! We’re proud to unveil the new Mendeley.com!

The new website has a clean new design, makes it easy to find all the ways in which Mendeley can help you as an academic, and helps bring our homepage into line with the fresh designs once you log into your Mendeley account.

“We wanted to update the site and improve the overall visual language, layout and navigation to make it more consistent with our other apps as well as easier for users to navigate and use,” said Matt Coulson, Head of Product. “We also wanted to use it as an opportunity to bring the information on all our products, including recently released features, bang up to date.”

How we designed our website for you, our users

User-centered design is a major part of our design process here at Mendeley, and the website was no different.

Miklos Petravich, Senior UX Designer and lead design on the homepage project, met regularly with users to ensure the website met their needs.

“We got feedback on our initial designs for our homepage where we found out while most people like the clean minimalistic direction but in the early mockups we featured inspirational messages,” said Petravich.
“Through User Discovery, we learned our users are straight-talking, straight to the point,” he said. “We originally thought inspirational messages would be interesting but we listened and learned that this is not what our users want, they want information like a list of features.”

mendeley-home-inspirational-1
Inspirational messages test design

The new website also allows us to show all the exciting new tools and products we’ve been developing to help researchers.

“We were trying to find a balance between what Mendeley is still known best for — reference manager — and how researchers can discover the tools that Mendeley now has for collaboration and showcasing the impact of their own research,” Petravich said.

What’s Next?

Not everything we changed is about design, however. “We wanted to make it easier for our in-house teams to manage the website,” said Coulson. Behind our shiny new facade is an updated content management system.  “This makes it very straightforward to make additions or amendments to the new site without writing a line of code,” he said.

Our plans for the new website are to bring you fresher content and quick updates —information that should not only help new users discover Mendeley, but also help current users find information easier. In the future, we’re going to have a review of all the content on our site and update the information, and we’re going to continue to incorporate more of your feedback.

If you live and work, or even if you are visiting the London area, we’d love to have you in for a User Discovery session. The one-hour sessions are held at our offices in Finsbury Square, and we’ll not only give you a tour of our cool space, but also send you away with a bag of Mendeley goodies and a £50 Amazon* gift card.

And, let us know what you think about the new design in the comments section below!
*If you do not want an Amazon gift card, we will work with you to find a suitable, non-cash alternative.

Stats is becoming part of your Mendeley profile

stats

Stats is changing from being a private dashboard (only you can see) to being a part of your profile so that, as well as showcasing your work, your profile also shows the exposure and impact your work is having.

The features currently shown on the stats overview page will be shown in a tab in the profile: aggregated publication metrics (h-index, views, citations, readers), aggregated view and citation timeline and media mentions.

Your profile will show a single list of all your publications, where:
• you control which publications are showcased to viewers of your profile;
• we show you (and only you) a detailed view of the impact each of your publications is having individually.

Just like now, you control who sees your profile, and this will include your new stats tab. Your profile is public by default, with an option to make visible to only your followers, and an additional option to restrict your followers to only those you give permission to.

Mendeley integrates with ORCID — uniquely identify your research

ORCID ID

Searching for research is now easier than ever — but how do you know whose research you’re reading? Is the piece by John A. Smith, the Harvard researcher, or by John A. Smith, the internet blogger?

Mendeley is integrating with ORCID, the Open Research Contributor ID non-profit, to bring your unique research identification to your Mendeley profile.

Since it’s launch in 2012, ORCID has issued over 2.5 million unique identifiers to help researchers keep the record straight on what work is whose.

The integration is already live — you can create or connect your ORCID ID with your Mendeley profile today!

Verified integration

ORCID AuhorisationYou’ll can link your existing ORCID account or create a new one, and you’ll have a choice whether to import your ORCID profile information into your Mendeley profile.

Future plans

For now, that’s a one-off import, but we are working with ORCID on how to keep your profiles in sync, so you don’t have to keep filling the same information in again and again.

 

 

Mendeley Data is FAIR2

The FAIR side of Mendeley Data

Mendeley Data is FAIRMendeley hosts a Hack Day aimed at making Mendeley Datasets accessible by FAIR

Earlier this year we launched Mendeley Data, an open data repository where researchers from all disciplines can deposit their datasets. Because we want to support all fields of science, we allow all file formats, and are flexible in the kinds of metadata researchers have to provide. However, we still want to ensure that it is easy for others to find the data, access the data, and work with the data.

That’s where FAIR comes in. FAIR stands for Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable and is an approach for data developed since January 2014 by a wide range of scientific and research data organisations including the Dutch Techcentre for Life Sciences (DTL), and which Elsevier and Mendeley and others support strongly.

In the FAIR Data approach, data should be:

  • Easy to find by both humans and computer systems, with metadata that allow the discovery of interesting datasets;
  • Stored for long term such that they can be easily accessed and/or downloaded with well-defined license and access conditions, whether at the level of metadata, or at the level of the actual data content;
  • Ready to be combined with other datasets by humans as well as computer systems;
  • Ready to be used for future research and to be processed further using computational methods.

Community organizations and funding agencies are starting to recognize the importance of data being FAIR; for example the European Commission is providing researchers that receive funding through Horizon2020 with FAIR data management guidelines.

Mendeley Data wants to support researchers making their data available in a FAIR manner and so we’re delighted to be able to collaborate with the DTL, who are developing FAIR tools.

Mendeley Data is FAIR2

Hacking the data

Last Friday developers from DTL joined the Mendeley Data developers for a Mendeley hack day. The goal for the hack day was to extend Mendeley Data API, to be able to expose the FAIR metadata, which allows researchers to discover datasets in Mendeley Data based on detailed metadata attributes.

The end goal is that a researcher using a FAIR-enabled tool can carry out a detailed search operation (for example search for datasets about a particular disease condition) and find relevant results from a range of repositories, including Mendeley Data.

In order to enable this, ultimately, we need to create an endpoint which exposes detailed metadata for our datasets. We knew this would be a tall order for our hack day, so we created a proof-of-concept endpoint which exposed this metadata for some static/hardcoded instances of collections and datasets.

This was enough to show the FAIR Data Point in action, starting off accessing Mendeley Data, and then drilling down into these example catalogues and from there finding the example datasets.

By the end of the hack day we had:

  • Mapped our datasets’ metadata to the FAIR metadata layers of the FAIR Data Point, including W3C’s DCAT spec;
  • Implemented the proof-of-concept FAIR Data Point-compatible endpoint providing metadata which can be consumed by FAIR-enabled tools;
  • Demoed the Mendeley Data FAIR Data Point in action, navigating through the layers of FAIR metadata including the data repository (Mendeley Data), catalogue, datasets and data files.

The outcomes of the hack day were: a much better understanding of how to make our datasets available as FAIR resources, so they can be found, integrated and reused by researchers along with other FAIR datasets; and creation of an endpoint which is only a few steps away from being productionised and available to use by the community.

We really enjoyed working closely with Luiz, DTL’s CTO, and developers Rajaram and Kees to concretely and tangibly make progress towards making Mendeley Data datasets more findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable!

Follow Mendeley Twitter to hear when we launch this capability!

Mendeley celebrates Ada Lovelace Day: Get your free poster!

women-in-stem-teal-1

Today is Ada Lovelace Day! Today we, along with the rest of the world, honor the world’s first computer programmer, Ada Lovelace. It is a day to recognize and celebrate the achievements of women in STEM fields.

For today only (Tuesday, 11 October), we are giving away a limited edition of our Women in STEM poster, by artist and scientist Claudia Stocker. Email mendeley-community@mendeley.com and we will mail you the poster, anywhere* in the world. Please include your full name, mailing address, and phone number in the email, otherwise we can not send your poster. Entries accepted until the end of day (which is actually 11:00 GMT on 12 October, to accommodate the whole globe!)

We’re participating online, with short videos highlighting women in STEM careers who work with us at Mendeley, in hopes of being role models to encourage more girls to go into STEM careers. Follow our Twitter and Facebook and see what others are sharing under #ALD16.

Liked our short videos and want to see more? Check out our more in-depth Women in STEM series on YouTube:

 

*We will do our best to send it to your country. Occasionally, we have issues with customs in certain countries.

Win a pair of tickets to Ada Lovelace Day Live in London!

THIS CONTEST IS NOW CLOSED. THANK YOU!

ada-lovelace-day-logo

We’re happy and proud to sponsor and contribute to Ada Lovelace Day, held annually on 11 October. Mendeley is sponsoring the Ada Lovelace Day Live!, an annual celebration of the achievements of women in STEM. Ada Lovelace was the world’s first computer programmer, and a perfect figurehead to represent women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics field.

The event features an inspiring line up of seven women from across the UK STEM world — design engineer Yewande Akinola, planetary physicist Dr Sheila Kanani, science writer Dr Kat Arney, developer Jenny Duckett, mathematician Dr Sara Santos, computational biologist Dr Bissan Al-Lazikani, and climate scientist Dr Anna Jones — each of whom will be giving a ten minute talk about their work. The evening is being compèred by the fabulous Helen Keen.

Mendeley is offering two pairs of tickets to attend this incredible event*, held this year at the IET, Savoy Place, in London at 6:30p.m. on Tuesday 11 October. This contest is now closed. Two names will be drawn at random. Want to make sure you secure your place or need more tickets? Tickets are £20 general entry and £5 concessions, and are available from Eventbrite.

We will also be participating in the worldwide celebrations by interviewing and highlighting women in STEM careers here at Mendeley! Follow our Twitter and Facebook this week and next for new contests, interesting facts and links, and brief interviews. Get a headstart with our Women in STEM series on YouTube:

 

*Prize is for event entry only. Contest winners are responsible for their own transportation and stay in London.