Advisor of the Month: William Hoyos

What is your name and job title?

William Hoyos, Ph.D. student in engineering

Where do you work/study?

Universidad EAFIT

How did you get into your field?

First, I studied bacteriology, then I studied systems engineering. I realized the application of engineering to medical problems and decided to pursue a PhD in engineering with an emphasis on artificial intelligence in medicine. Currently, I work on artificial intelligence models for dengue prediction and prescription.

Where do you do your best work?

I believe that my best work is in the application of engineering in medical problem solving. Besides, I am very good at sharing my knowledge with others. It gives me satisfaction and allows me to continue learning.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

About 7 years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I was using EndNote.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I love to teach. I like to share my knowledge with others. I am always willing to share new tools that make the research process easier for my co-workers. I am commonly demonstrating new features released by Mendeley.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

I would like to meet Andrew Ng. World pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence. Ng co-founded Coursera and deeplearning.ai.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, by Yuval Noah Harari.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

The application of fuzzy cognitive maps to assess causality in infectious diseases such as dengue.

What is the best part about working in research?

The positive impact your results generate for humanity.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Getting funding for research.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

A wonderful tool for research. A platform with capabilities to link researchers, organize bibliographic references, share knowledge, among other powerful features of Mendeley.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Yes, have passion and love for what they do. I think these are the two fundamental pillars of success in research.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Advisor of the Month: Adilson Rocha Ferreira

What is your name and job title?

My name is Adilson Rocha Ferreira and I am a researcher and teacher.

Where do you work/study?

Currently, I work at the Education Department of the State of Alagoas, in the Northeast of Brazil, a region well known for its beautiful beaches, natural beauty and a warrior and struggling people since its origins. As a PhD student in Education, I study at the Federal University of Alagoas, Postgraduate Program in Education, Education Center.

How did you get into your field?

I entered the Federal University of Alagoas in the Physical Education Degree course in 2009, finishing it in 2013, and since then I have been improving at other levels. In 2016 I concluded the Specialization Course in Media in Education and then the Master in Education. I am currently a PhD student in Education and in the Pedagogy course as well. In 2015, I obtained approval in a contest to provide places for elementary school teachers and since then I have been teaching Physical Education classes for students from 7 to 12 years old in public schools of the State Department of Education of Alagoas.

Where do you do work the best?

I believe that my best job is to develop research on digital technologies applied in the fields of education and health, with an emphasis on conventional digital games, exergames and gamification, in order to think other ways to learn, teach and exercise with the support of these technologies.

How long have you been using Mendeley?

Around the year 2016, at the beginning of the Master of Education course, I found Mendeley and since then I can’t live without it.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Prior to Mendeley, I had never used any other reference manager, I used to manage files in folders and elaborate citations and references manually, based on several manuals. From the experience with Mendeley, I was able to find others, but none of them captivated me as much as Mendeley!

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

Being part of the Mendeley team was what most instigated me to become a Mendeley Advisor, as it is very gratifying to contribute to Elsevier with feedbacks and promote Mendeley demonstrations for different groups in the academic community.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Currently I already work with researchers in whom I always dreamed of working together, such as Deise Juliana Francisco, Neiza de Lourdes Frederico Fumes, Fernando Silvio Cavalcante Pimentel, Lynn Rosalina Gama Alves, Flávio Anderson Pedrosa de Melo and César Augusto Otero Vaghetti. However, going further, I would like to meet and work with James Paul Gee, Humberto Maturana, Francisco Varela and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, who are scholars on which I base my research.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Silver, C., & Lewins, A. (2014). Using software in qualitative research: a step-by-step guide. 55 City Road, London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I am learning to play guitar. So any note or sound that I manage to make at that initial moment seems to me to be incredible achievements.

What is the best part about working in research?

For me, the best part of working as a team is to learn from the different skills that a team brings together, so that by collaborating with my skills I can learn and develop other skills.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

I continue to follow the same line of reasoning: deal with the difference! Respecting the adversary and knowing how far one can go are challenges that must be managed in group work.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

I would like everyone to know, especially those who are starting courses in higher education, that there is no longer a need to create countless folders and get lost in the middle of several files. With Mendeley, you can collect articles and similar items in one place, in the cloud, and carry with you wherever you go with just a Mendeley account.

Do you have any advice for young researchers?

Be organized in your readings by including Mendeley in your workflow. At first it may seem like extra work, but in the future, it will save many hours of your academic readings and writings.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

How to add your Mendeley Advisor certification to your LinkedIn profile

A LinkedIn profile is popular way to organize and showcase your education and career experience. This is also a great platform to add any licenses or certificates you achieve, like your Mendeley Advisor status.  

In this quick guide, we’ll help you add your Mendeley Advisor certification and badge to your LinkedIn profile.


First things first

Please make sure you have successfully registered as a Mendeley Advisor by visiting our Mendeley Advisor Community page, clicking “Register as an Advisor” and filling out the form.

Get started

  1. Sign into LinkedIn with your existing account, or if you are new to LinkedIn, create a new account for free
  2. Navigate to your profile and scroll down to the Licenses & certifications section
  3. Click the “+” icon to the right to add a new entry

In the new window, enter in your details:

  • Name = Mendeley Advisor
  • Issuing Organization = Mendeley (choose the first Mendeley result with the red logo that auto-populates)
  • Check the box next to “This credential does not expire”
  • Enter in the month and year you achieved your certification (this can be an estimate if you don’t know your exact date)
  • Leave credential ID blank
  • Credential URL = https://www.mendeley.com/advisor-community
  • Click “save”

And you’re all set. Now your Mendeley Advisor certification is proudly displayed on your LinkedIn profile for all to see. Congratulations!

Advisor of the month: Heidi Jørgensen

What is your name and job title?

My name is Heidi Jørgensen and I am a librarian.

Where do you work?

I work at University College Absalon, Campus Næstved, Denmark.

How did you get into your field?

I graduated in 1996 from The Royal School of Librarianship in Denmark. I was immediately offered a job at a public library but learned quickly that it was the academic part that had my interest. I was employed at The Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library in Copenhagen, both as a librarian but also as a consultant for the institutes. However the capital was not for me, I have therefore been working at University College Absalon for the past 18 years where we educate:
Bachelor in Biomedical Laboratory Science
Bachelor in Nursing
Bachelor in Occupational Therapy
Bachelor in Physiotherapy
Bachelor in Public Administration

Where do you do work the best?

When I am able to help students or teachers find scientific literature on exactly what they are looking for. Seeing that what they learn, allows them to move forward with their projects. For me, it is equally important whether they will learn to search databases such as PubMed, Scopus etc. or whether they will just learn to use Mendeley so they can cite their sources correctly.

How long have you been using Mendeley?

For six years and an advisor for five years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I have used RefMan/EndNote.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I became an advisor because this was the best way for me to get to know all about Mendeley and even to come up with new ideas on how to use it.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Tycho Brahe (1546 –1601). He was a Danish nobleman, astronomer, astrologer, alchemist, and writer known for his accurate and comprehensive astronomical observations.
Tycho was also famous for his contributions to medicine; his herbal medicines were in use as late as the 1900s. This is where we have a common interest and it would have been a privilege to learn from him.
We also have an expression in Scandinavia “Tycho Brahe days” which refers to a number of “unlucky days” – I think we all can relate to that.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Klaris, H. W. (2015). Skyggernes bog. Sorø: Tellerup.
(I used drag and drop from Mendeley)
[The Book of Shadows]. Every year I make a Christmas calendar for all the students at Absalon (10.000+) with gifts. It is an online event with quizzes about Christmas, Absalon, but indeed also about the resources that we, as a library, offer the students. Mendeley has been a part of our quiz since I started the tradition. This year we got more than 5.000 copies of this book to use as gifts. I thought I’d better read it.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I bought truffle mycelium and have now learned how to plant it along with the roots of a tree. If it works, I will know in approx. five years but then I should also be able to harvest both black and white truffles. I do not quite trust it, but it was very interesting!

What is the best part about working in research?

The best part for me, as a librarian, is when students realize that they are able to find the latest research within their field of study. It gives me hope that in the future when they work in our Health Care System they will keep doing this and provide the best care for our citizens.

And access! It is impossible to have access to all the resources that the users want. It is a matter of prioritizing which subscriptions you choose to subscribe to. Many are expensive and the funds are unfortunately not enough.

Do you have any advice for young researchers?

Stay updated. Make a search string that fits your subject area and create an alert. This will help you to stay updated.


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.