Empower Researchers to Reach Their Full Potential with Mendeley

mendeley resourcesPrevious articles about Mendeley have been directed towards researchers, and how they can benefit from this powerful online workflow ecosystem. Mendeley helps researchers, readers and authors build their knowledge, stay up to date on trends, organize, advance and showcase their research, track and store the data they generate, move their careers forward, and find funding. But Mendeley is important to you and your library as well. It can raise and sustain your perception as a valuable resource center for all the different constituencies within the university.

The Future Holds Legitimate Concerns

There’s no denying that librarians need and want to reinvent themselves. While libraries will not cease to exist, they are becoming a reimagined asset that you must define, promote and manage. You need to be recognized as the “Switzerland” of your institution, retaining control of resources and decision-making while simultaneously having the right avenues to content for any possible research objective or need.

In addition to your own challenges, your researchers are more stressed than ever. Broad-based collaboration is much more prevalent, especially among younger researchers. The scramble for research funding is shifting from local to global, and research from emerging markets is increasing in volume and value. Researchers continue to seek more entry points to open science. At the same time, they must keep up with the latest technological developments without losing focus on their research topics. Universities are competing harder than ever for every research dollar – and that competition is felt to varying degrees throughout each institution.

Not surprisingly, nearly all of you are forced to do more with less. No librarian has ever said that she or he has too much funding or too large a staff! With an increased workload and a decreased headcount, it’s necessary for you to streamline wherever possible. You’re responsible for managing a large number of databases and platforms, and simplification is critical if you’re going to be successful.

You Can Facilitate Change with Mendeley

As librarians, you love to provide guidance that leads to solutions. You want to be better at anticipating needs and supporting goals. Efficient processes are important to you. You also want to know how resources will fit into your budget. You’re on board with the evolution of your role and that of your library, and so is Mendeley. You have a golden opportunity to help your researchers unlock the future of science. Let Mendeley help you serve as the cornerstone for revolutionary discoveries. It’s the workflow resource your researchers want and need.

 

Showcase Your Research with Mendeley

mendeley difference

The last Mendeley article looked at Mendeley Data, and how it helps you manage your data while you focus on your research. But you also have to manage your research persona…and Mendeley can do that too. It enables you to inform your peers and the public about your academic accomplishments, extending your influence and your career prospects. In addition, Mendeley can help you discover, review and keep track of the profiles of other researchers who could inspire your work or just might end up being your future collaborators.

The Right Connections are Out There

Once you open a free Mendeley account and create a profile, you can join one or more groups, or form your own group to drive information sharing that highlights your research. In Public Groups, you can quickly make new connections by searching for people and finding researchers with similar interests. Your Mendeley feed suggests individuals you might want to follow as well. With only a minimal time investment, you immediately become part of a community – a network of eight million peers now able to learn about your research and your accomplishments.

While you’re shining a light on your research, you’re also opening new opportunities to partner with others working in your field or a related one. The diverse membership of Mendeley’s Research Network represents virtually every field of research, facilitating collaboration across the globe.

Mendeley’s Intelligence Complements Yours

Your research requires you to be highly disciplined, efficient and an expert in your field. Mendeley works that way as well, automatically capturing information like authors, title and publisher. By making organization and browsing easy, Mendeley broadens the reach of your research with minimal effort on your part.

By generating citations and bibliographies while you write, Mendeley shares your process with others and highlights your work. Mendeley enables you to easily see who’s viewing, downloading and citing your research. It gives you more chances to make important discoveries, whether on your own or as part of a team.

You can easily add your research interests to your Mendeley account, encouraging others with the same or related interests to follow you. You may also update your profile with your unique ORCID indentifier, and link with your Scopus profile, to further showcase your research information. Mendeley shows details such as your h-index, citations, readers and views during a given time period.

Don’t Keep Your Light Under a Basket

You have a golden opportunity to make a difference and inspire a community – perhaps the world – with your research. Mendeley can help you expand your impact while you’re focused on your work. Why not be part of a network of connections – and call attention to your achievements – when it’s so easy to do?

Get started! Sign up today.

Mendeley Advisor of the Month: July 2018

Mendeley july advisor of the month

Mendeley advisor of the month: Gabriel de Oliveira Ramos is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Artificial Intelligence Lab from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium). He obtained his PhD (with highest honours) and MSc degrees in Computer Science from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) in 2018 and 2013, respectively. Ramos’ research focuses on multiagent reinforcement learning and game theory, especially in the context of complex scenarios, such as traffic and smart grids.

How did you get into your field and what is your research story?

I started to write my first computer programs at 14 and developed, since then, my passion for Computer Science. Not much later, during my bachelor’s first year, I got in contact with Artificial Intelligence (AI) for the first time and decided that AI would be my research field. In the following years, I developed my research on different AI topics, including machine learning, game theory, and planning. In all cases, my research has always been motivated by real-world problems, like traffic, electricity grids, and logistics. Moreover, the theoretical properties of my methods have always played a role in my research.

Where do you do your research/work the best? What kind of environment suits you?

Any environment where I can balance insightful discussion sessions (with my peers) with silent study sessions. Good computer resources are also extremely useful, together with the traditional paper-and-pen combination.

How long have you been on Mendeley? 

I started using Mendeley in June 2013, just after I finished my masters, to organize the mess of my references at that time.

What were you using prior to Mendeley and how does Mendeley influence your research?

Keeping track of the literature is fundamental in science. Before using Mendeley, I had all my references grouped by topics into folders of my computer. The main problem, however, was to efficiently store my annotations and conclusions about such references. With Mendeley, I could finally store all my notes in an efficient and reliable way. Together with the nice search mechanism, it became easier for me to focus on my research.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor and how are you involved with the program?

I have been a Mendeley enthusiast since I started using it (indeed, it has considerably increased my productivity on specific tasks). As such, I always spread the word about it. Moreover, I contributed to Mendeley by suggesting important improvement several times. In this sense, I always felt as an informal advisor, which became a formal status in May 2015.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

My work has been inspired by so many brilliant researchers that I could not mention all of them here. Among them, I should definitely highlight Prof. Avrim Blum (TTI-Chicago), Prof. Michael Bowling (UAlberta), and Prof. Tim Roughgarden (Stanford), whose works motivated (and shed light on) my PhD research.

What book are you reading at the moment and why?

The second edition of Reinforcement Learning: An Introduction, by Sutton and Barto. It is always important to refresh such fundamental topics.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I attended some of the world’s most important conferences on Artificial Intelligence (ICML and AAMAS), and I enforced to myself the belief that, as a researcher, you should always be open-minded and eager for learning new things.

What is the best part about working in research?

You are always learning new ways of solving problems that could potentially improve people’s lives.

And the worst/most challenging part about working in research?

Sometimes (almost always, in fact) the answer is not the one you would expect. Although challenging, that is what moves science forward (and actually, that is one of the most exciting parts of doing science).

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley really makes your reference management easier.

Meet Tim Keitt – Integrative Biologist and Mendeley Power User

Tim Keitt is a researcher at the University of Texas at AustinDuring a recent trip to Texas for the Non-hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells meeting, I took a little side trip to the University of Texas at Austin to meet one of Mendeley’s power users. We talked about his research, new projects he is working on and how Mendeley helps him collaborate with his colleagues in South America.

How Dr. Keitt is using Mendeley in his research

Dr. Keitt finds a great deal of value in the collaborative aspects of Mendeley, allowing him to share papers with colleagues distributed around the globe, no matter what OS they use, but he also sees a lot of value in the development of a new citation infrastructure. One application he mentioned here was correction for “citation mutation”, the process wherein a citation gets repeated in successive papers slowly accumulating transcriptional errors until it no longer can be traced back to the original work.

Insights from Integrative Biology

It was really fascinating for me to hear him talk about ecosystem patterns because one of my earliest scientific fascinations was with fractals, a type of pattern found throughout nature. While much of his earlier research involved fieldwork, he’s started doing more molecular work with the advent of better molecular tools for studying and identifying species similarity.

In this respect, large scale biological datasets have become very important to him. One project, which may lead to the creation of a HapMap-style database for non-human species, has made him particularly aware of how idiosyncratic the metadata associated with database entries can be. While having access to larger-scale data has made some scientific questions more tractable, it has also raised its own set of challenges. He gave an example here which I think is instructive for many of the issues scientists are now facing as we put more and more data online and seek effective tools for facilitating collaborations.

In the early days of sequencing, each research group would have their own database with its own structure and that worked just fine, until confusion arose regarding how to refer to a specific sequence and people started to try to merge databases to prevent duplication. We now have the GenBank as a centralized repository for sequence information and sequences can be unambiguously identified by referring to their accession number, but we didn’t get there until editors started requiring that manuscripts reporting sequences contain the Genbank accession number.

Editors forced the issue in this case, but any effort to systematize the reporting of sequences initially would have faced challenges such as who controls the repository and why should a busy researcher bother submitting to it. Repeat that last sentence again, and if you’ve followed any of the discussion about online engagement of scientists with literature, it should sound very familiar.

From Molecules to Ecosystems

Dr. Keitt got his start working in the rainforests of the Amazon where he studied species variance in one of the most diverse ecosystems on planet. Later, he came to the University of Texas where he continues to work on the effect of ecosystem patterning on species diversity. While he no longer does a great deal of fieldwork, he still collaborates with colleagues in South America for ongoing projects. He’s done some work on the Bachman Sparrow in Texas and is really excited about a upcoming project studying coral in Micronesia.

www.keittlab.org/

Mendeley Webinars take us around the globe

Webinar ScreenshotLast week we hosted two Webinars for scientists and information professionals from the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), an international network of research institutions as well as governmental and non-governmental organizations. CGIAR is aiming to achieve sustainable food security and reduce poverty in developing countries using scientific research and research-related activities in the fields of agriculture, forestry, fisheries, policy, and the environment. We are always pleased to find out about new areas of research, and to see that many people are already using Mendeley. Over at CGIAR’s ICT and Knowledge Management Department, Mendeley is widely considered to be an “intuitive, easy-to-use tool for online reference management” – Thanks, Meena!

So how global is global, then? Looking at the attendees of last week’s webinars: very, very global! Mendeley is being used in so many diverse locations – there were CGIAR researchers, librarians, and knowledge management specialists from Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Colombia, Egypt, Germany, India, Malaysia, Nigeria, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Syria, the UK and the USA. And it’s great to see that we can help to make research easier.

We are planning to offer more webinars very soon. If you or your organization is interested in a tailor-made web seminar, please let us know at community@mendeley.com.