Efficiently building knowledge

By: Louise Springthorpe

BMK webinar image 2How much time do you spend adding to your knowledge base? Consider all the tasks involved: searching for data and literature; evaluating their relevance; downloading what you need; and then organizing everything, including your own experimental data, so that you can always find and share a given piece of information when it’s required.

We estimate that researchers spend one to two days per week on such tasks. Fortunately, there are ways to increase efficiency, leaving more time to focus on research projects.

One way is ensuring that information is easy to discover. Elsevier’s research solutions, like ScienceDirect, Scopus, Reaxys and Engineering Village, access high-quality collections of literature and data indexed with dedicated taxonomies. Articles and books are available in electronic formats to support efficient review, and data export is possible in a range of formats suitable for further analytics.

Mendeley is a popular and user-friendly platform for creating your own library. Its collaborative features allow multiple researchers to annotate documents and share information. Elsevier is also refining our text mining tools to improve library searching. For more reliable data capture, management and storage, we offer an ELN and cloud-based platforms, including Mendeley Data.

These cutting-edge solutions reflect Elsevier’s promise to build an ecosystem of solutions and services that help researchers achieve their goals more efficiently.

Join our Build My Knowledge: Effectively collect, organize and retrieve your personal knowledge base webinar where 3 fellow researchers will discuss how they effectively collect, organize and retrieve their personal knowledge base and provide insights on how they keep themselves organized in the era of information overload.

Date: Tuesday 10th September
Time: 10am Los Angeles, 1pm New York, 6pm London

Register here

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2017 Reaxys PhD Prize

Open for Submissions: the 2017 Reaxys PhD Prize

Today marks an important day in the chemistry calendar: the launch of the 2017 Reaxys PhD Prize! From now until March 13, talented and ambitious chemistry PhD students from all around the world will be sending their submissions, all hoping to show the Review Board that they deserve a place on the list of finalists.

It’s considered a high honor to be a Reaxys PhD Prize finalist. Each entry is judged in terms of originality, innovation, importance and applicability of the research. The reviewers also look at the rigor of approach and methodology and the quality and clarity of related publications. Recommendation letters and CVs are also considered. Hundreds of applications come in each year, with students from over 400 institutions having participated to date, and the Review Board have consistently praised the quality of the submissions.

It is the Review Board’s task to select the 45 finalists, who are invited to present their research at the Reaxys PhD Prize Symposium. This year’s event will be held in Shanghai in October, with travel bursaries and accommodations provided to ensure that the finalists can attend. The 2016 symposium was in London—you can see the highlights in this short video:

In addition to gaining recognition for their research excellence and an opportunity to present their work, all the finalists are invited to join the Reaxys Prize Club, a unique, international network of chemists from all researchers and career paths. Now with over 300 members, the Club has proven to boost the careers of young chemists, helping them to meet with other chemists, attend conferences, and organize events. Prize Club members also receive personal access to Reaxys and Reaxys Medicinal Chemistry and discounts on Elsevier books.

Being a finalist is an accolade in itself, but the participants all certainly hope to be selected as one of the three winners. The shortlisted best finalists make a final oral presentation of their research at the Reaxys PhD Prize Symposium, based on which, the Review Board Chairs select the winners. Each winner receives a prize of $2000 in addition to all the benefits that finalists get.

The competition is open to anyone who has just finished or is currently engaged in a PhD program where the research focus is related to chemistry. Previous finalists have hailed from institutions in Asia, the Americas, Europe and the Middle East—and they are all members of the Reaxys Prize Club, meaning it is a global network of dedicated and talented chemists.

Could you or someone you know be one of this year’s finalists? All the details about applying can be found here.

How a PhD prize is supporting chemistry’s bright young stars

By David Evans, Scientific Affairs Director at Reed Elsevier Properties SA

The fuel efficiency of our cars depends on the relative reactivity of the hydrocarbons in the fuel; in 2013 a PhD student published a paper describing a new material that can filter out the molecules that make our cars less efficient. A year later, a different PhD student published work that makes it possible to watch the tiny structures inside cells moving around in real-time, using a microscope.

Rising chemistry stars like these will be tomorrow’s leading scientists, developing solutions to many of the problems we face today. Recognizing their work and supporting their careers is vital, and that’s exactly what the Reaxys PhD Prize is for. The best known and respected of its kind, the Prize has attracted almost 2500 submissions from more than 400 universities in its six-year history.

Every year, 45 finalists are selected out of hundreds of submissions from chemistry PhD candidates and researchers who have recently been awarded their PhD, in a process managed by a review committee of renowned chemists. The finalists represent the world’s best young chemists, and their work is showcased at an annual Symposium.

Submissions are now open for the 2016 PhD Prize, and we’re preparing to see even more outstanding and impactful research this year.

Celebrating success
Imagine you’re just finishing your chemistry PhD and you’re standing at the foot of your career, wondering how you’ll be able to scale the mountain. You’ve done some really cutting-edge work already, but you have even bigger ideas. Now you need people to bounce them around with and a mentor to guide you.

The Reaxys PhD Prize gives exceptional young researchers a leg-up, helping them scale the difficult first part of their career and supporting them with lifetime benefits.

The two PhD students mentioned at the start of this article are previous PhD Prize winners and are now two of almost 300 members of an elite group – the Reaxys Prize Club. Each year the 45 new finalists are welcomed into the Prize Club, giving them the chance to network with some of the world’s best chemists.

The PhD Prize has been running since 2010, hence, Club members now hold a variety of positions in academia and industry, giving incoming members a great opportunity to find mentors and collaborators. Over 50 members are now in their first independent academic positions.

How it works
The 2016 PhD Prize is open to those who are in a chemistry PhD program or have completed their PhD after 1 January 2015, and who have published a peer-reviewed paper during their PhD. They apply online with their peer-reviewed paper, along with a CV (resume) and a letter of recommendation from their PhD supervisor.

Submissions are open until 8 February 2016, after this the review process will start, and once completed the review committee will select the 45 finalists. All 45 finalists automatically become members of the Reaxys Prize Club and a host of other benefits, including unlimited personal access to Reaxys and Reaxys Medicinal Chemistry and discounts on Elsevier Chemistry books and scientific conferences.

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All the finalists are invited to attend the 2016 Reaxys PhD Prize Symposium. Before the symposium, the review committee will publish a shortlist of applicants. At the Symposium, all the finalists will present their research at a poster session, and the shortlisted candidates will give oral presentations. The three winners will be chosen after the oral presentations and will each be awarded a cheque for $2000.

Are you up for the challenge? We are looking forward to seeing the exciting new research being done by today’s rising stars and to welcoming a new wave of members to the Reaxys Prize Club.

To stay updated on the finalists, shortlisted candidates and the winners, visit the PhD Prize website.