Day 3: Top 40 Apps in Binary Battle to benefit science

This is the third of four parts announcing the top 40-ish Apps entered into the Mendeley-PLoS Binary Battle. To see the first batch of apps, check out Day One. And Day Two with the second batch is here. Check back tomorrow for the final batch of apps.

As a reminder, the top 10 apps will be announced in two weeks and the overall winners will be announced November 30th

Now, in order of entry received date, the third batch of apps to benefit science: Read More »

Day 2: Binary Battle Top 40 Apps benefiting science

This is the second of four parts announcing the top 40-ish Apps entered into the Mendeley-PLoS Binary Battle. To see the first batch of ten apps, check out Day One. Check back tomorrow for the next batch of 10 apps.

As a reminder, the top 10 apps will be announced in two weeks and the overall winners will be announced November 30th

Now, in order of entry received date, the second batch of 10 out of 40 apps to benefit science: Read More »

Hack4Knowledge @ Mendeley: living bibliographies, visual search and more #h4k

This weekend saw dozens of hackers converge on the Mendeley offices in New York and London for a weekend of fun, games, and changing how research is done. Hack4Knowledge arose from internal Mendeley hackdays, where our developers are released from the tyranny of Trac tickets and given free rein to build whatever crazy idea comes to mind. Some of our best ideas have come out of these events, so it only made sense to open our doors and invite in the broader developer community. On Saturday the 11th, the offices in London and New York were opened; food, beer, and entertainment were secured; and a few dozen hackers sat down for a weekend of code and camaraderie. There were 10 teams that presented their work at the end of the weekend. Some of the projects are live and linked so you can check them out, for the others I’ve included screenshots or links to the code repository.
Read More »

PLoS joins Mendeley as co-sponsor of the Binary Battle!

The Public Library of Science, the world’s largest Open Access publisher, has joined Mendeley in co-sponsoring the Binary Battle, the contest to build the best apps that make science more open using PLoS and Mendeley’s API’s. This brings the prize money to be won up to $16,000 plus other cool gifts and the opportunity to get your entries in front of a panel of influential judges from technology, media and science.

What is the Binary Battle?

The Mendeley & PLoS Binary Battle is a contest to build the coolest, most popular, and most useful application using Mendeley’s open database of over 90 million research papers, usage statistics, reader demographics, social tags, and related research recommendations or PLoS’s Search API which provides PLoS content for your desktop, web, or mobile application. You can find the full details on the Mendeley API Binary Battle page or read the announcement from PLoS.Read More »

Get Excited and Make Things: Mendeley is a research platform

Don't Keep Calm and Carry On

Image via blackbeltjones

The Mendeley API has been public since August and we now have tons of cool projects using the unique social research data available through the Open API. There are plugins for WordPress and Drupal, data mashups like Readermeter, a mobile app for Android(coming soon), and there’s even a basic app that shows papers related to a tweet.
Check out the App Showcase to see some of these and get information on how to use these great tools your fellow academics have created. I’ve put up a page showing the WordPress plugins in action here, and for many of the others, just click through to check them out.

Hey Developers! Want to know how can you get in on all this fun? Just step right over to our shiny new developer portal and you’ll find all you need to get started. Documentation, developer support, and more. How about hacking something together this weekend?

If you just want to show your profile or your group papers on a page, we’ve made that easy for you. Just click the embed button in the about box on the group overview page to get a customized code snippet you can use anywhere you can put HTML, such as profile pages or blog sidebars. To embed your profile, click on My Account and select “Edit My Profile”. On the right, you’ll see the embed option. More details here.

Announcing the Mendeley Open API – Call for proposals

It’s almost here, the Mendeley Open API that third-party developers can use to create their own mashups. The API won’t be immediately available to everyone quite yet, but we would like to invite any developers interested in early access to submit a proposal of what you envision building.

The call for proposals is open until Friday, May 14th. Selected developers will be notified between now and May 21st.

For more information on how to submit your proposal please see the Open API page.

For more information about the API methods please see the API methods page.

If you take a look at our feedback page you will quickly see how many feature requests we are getting on a daily basis. We would love to implement all of them, but unfortunately that isn’t possible. Additionally, many researchers require niche-specific tools that are not suitable for inclusion in a general purpose tool such as Mendeley. The obvious solution to both of these problems is to open up the data and let creative developers and inspired academics create what they need on top of that data.

With the Open API, you will have access to both aggregated statistics and your own library. Developers can create applications to improve your research experience (for privacy reasons, you will need to authenticate yourself before third-party applications can access your data). Libraries and publishers can build simple Web apps to pull in article-level metrics to enhance what you see when visiting their websites.

We are extremely excited to see what the community and developers, who for years have not had access to this type of data, can create with the API tools. For far too long, this type of data has been siloed away from the general developer community; even worse, the end-user researchers. The richness of academic knowledge is finally in an accessible and open form, so that “Silicon Valley” and other creative developers around the world have a practical means to participate in scientific research. The world is now connected to academia.

Jason Hoyt, PhD | Research Director

Follow Jason and Mendeley on twitter for more announcements