Mendeley & E-PIC event in Austria on November 21st and November 22nd

What helps researchers to do their jobs? How can you best organize your documents, generate citations and bibliographies in a whole range of journal styles with just a few clicks? We offer you the chance to get to know Mendeley in Austria – at TU Vienna (Nov 21st) and TU Graz (Nov 22nd).  You will hear about the enablement of reference management, support of international collaborations and researcher data insights.

Register Now

 The program:

  1. Welcome and Introduction
    Presented by: Jürgen Stickelberger, Account Manager Elsevier
  2. Overview of researcher and institutional solutions
    Presented by: Giovanna Bartens, Market Development Manager, Mendeley

    • Mendeley at a Glance
    • Mendeley Institutional Edition (MIE)
    • Live demo – Mendeley key features
    • Your research community within Mendeley
  3. Break
    • Mendeley Updates – Roadmap and Developments
    • Presented by: Virginie Wagenaar, Product Manager MIE
  4. Introduction to Elsevier Product Insights for Customers (E-Pic)
    Presented by: Chinmay Panigrahi, Product Manager E-Pic Q&A

 

TU Vienna:

Tuesday, November 21st
13:00 am– 16:00 pm

Contact person:
Ingrid Haas

Location:
Vortragsraum der Universitätsbibliothek
der TU Wien
Resselgasse 4, 5. OG
1040 Vienna

Austria

TU Graz:

Wednesday, November 22nd
10:00  am – 13:00 pm

Contact person:
Dr. Ulrike Kriessmann

Location: 
Bibliothek und Archiv der TU Graz,
Seminarraum BZK1012, 1.KG
Technikerstr. 4
8010 Graz

Austria

 

For further question please contact:

Tanja Giessner
Customer Marketing Manager
A&G Europe (Europe Central)
t.fischer.1@elsevier.com
t + 31 20 485 2366

Navigating through the digital quicksand: Announcing our next Talks@Mendeley!

Kristen Marhaver TED Global
Photo by Ryan Lash

We’re really excited to announce the speaker for the February edition of our Talks@Mendeley series, which showcases thought leaders from around the world to discuss science, technology and research issues with the Mendeley team and our community.

Kristen Marhaver is a Marine Biologist and TED Senior Fellow based in the Caribbean, who divides her time between developing ‘assisted reproduction’ methods for threatened coral species and working to change the way that scientists publish, organise, and communicate their research.

And while we certainly don’t hate corals (a requirement if you want to follow Kristen’s @CoralSci profile on Twitter) the latter part of her work certainly struck a chord with Mendeley, as we’re trying to do many of these same things for researchers around the world.

“I’m working to increase the power of science in society by challenging scientists and journalists to re-examine the inefficient publishing traditions of the past, challenging young scientists to approach the publishing process with fresh eyes rather than blindly adopting the traditions inherited from old academia”

Kristen’s talk: How to recognise digital quicksand: The modern pitfalls of science publishing and communication will discuss how the process of delivering scientific knowledge to the public is a wild maze loaded with unmarked traps. It will also provide some insights for scientists, journalist and publishers on how to identify and avoid those traps so that they can fulfil their noble duty of growing and disseminating the collective body of knowledge held by human society.

She will look at the reasons why science often fails to achieve its rightful place in society because of incentive systems that prevent focused and cohesive science communication to the public. One of the main issues she identifies is the tendency to treat science like a disposable product instead of a durable good, effectively reducing research to ‘click bait’ (something she recently wrote about in this Wired article).

Kristen Marhaver Diving in Curacao
Photo by Mark Vermelj

“There is also a big problem with many digital science tools that end up helping to insulate scientists instead of connecting them to each other and society in general, and with some of the current focus on open access, which can actually distract us from other facets of communication that matter for translating science for society.”

Spaces at the event are extremely limited, but if you’re in London on the 26th do drop us a line via email (alice.bonasio@mendeley.com) or the Team Mendeley Twitter Account. You can also Tweet your questions or comments to @MendeleyTalks and subscribe to the Mendeley YouTube channel to watch the live stream and video of Kristen’s talk!

Inspiring Women in Technology

Paula500

By: Paula Clerkin, 3rd year CS with AI student at the University of Nottingham

As a third and final year, I am having to come to terms with the end of my time at university. It’s pretty daunting thinking about leaving this lovely bubble of support and finding a proper job in the real world.

Over the past few years, I have tallied up a rather impressive number of attendances to careers events across the country. I like to think that I’ve learned new things at each event but I find I’ve always come away feeling a little disheartened and overwhelmed by the tough requirements and competition. These events manage to, rather heavy handily coerce attendees into applying for internships and grad schemes using impressive facts, figures and shiny benefits. These careers events are missing something. They don’t inspire their attendees.

Although I’ve been to many career events, I still don’t know what path I should take. This is why I am organising Inspire Women In Technology (WIT).

Inspire WIT is a day to celebrate the female individuals working within the technology industry. We have fascinating speakers from all walks of life talking about their personal experiences of working in the industry. They all have different backgrounds and areas, yet they share the same drive and passion for technology.

I find every one of our speakers inspiring. These are the ladies that I adamantly follow on Twitter, I read their blogs and I aspire to do what they do. But I want to know more; I want to know about how they got where they are, the stories behind the decisions they’ve made and I want to listen to their advice. And I know I’m not the only one.

I think it’s about time there was a day for everyone; tech enthusiasts, non-programmers, students at college and university, women and men, to come together and see how truly vast and impressive the technology industry is and how everyone can be part of it.

But it’s not just about talks. The second half of the day will consist of workshops, mini-events and networking opportunities. An Introduction to Programming for Beginners run by Code Club, How to Tackle a Technical Interview by Bloomberg and a live Ethical Hack in 10 by CapitalOne, are just a few of the workshops attendees can go to. There are of course and hardware hack and an all-important careers talk. There truly is something for everyone.

Although networking sounds formal, Inspire WIT attendees will be able to meet and mingle with representatives from the best technology companies around. I have added mini-events such as retro game stations, Oculus’ and a photo booth. There is no pressure, no speed-networking; the emphasis is on taking your time, asking all your questions and most importantly, being inspired and having fun!

I want Inspire WIT to be an opportunity for over 200 attendees to discover their potential and learn more about such a fascinating industry. If there is only one thing that Inspire WIT helped just one person discover, then we have done our job.

Cambridge Union Society Debates Right to be Forgotten

Cambridge Union Society

In May 2014, the European Court of Justice ruling saw Google and other search engines receiving thousands of requests to remove links to certain content deemed damaging to individuals. Sir Jimmy Wales from the Wikimedia Foundation is amongst those that have spoken out at length against the ruling. In the company’s first transparency report, it posted Google’s Removal Notices, something that Wales describes as akin to “removing the index from a book”.

As things stand, in Europe people have the right to request such removals if content relating to them is inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant or excessive in the light of elapsed time. However, apart from serious concerns raised with regards to self-censorship, it is argued that the Right to be Forgotten is actually a false promise, since the information itself is not corrected, but links to it are “silently deleted,” prompting outcries against lack of transparency and breach of public interest.

This is clearly a very complex issue, which impacts all areas of modern society, including academic research. One example would be if only the latest version of research papers were made available because certain information contained within them was deemed “inadequate” or “irrelevant”. This could potentially leave researchers unable to place current research into broader context, and different, less proven theories and perspectives within scientific debates could be excluded, leading to narrowed perspectives and possibly damaging the integrity of studies conducted within those filtered conditions.

It is, however, crucial to safeguard privacy and individual rights, but what is the best way of providing those mechanisms without causing broader infringements upon collective rights to information? The Cambridge Union Society, which is celebrating its 200th year of tradition in debating difficult topics, is now stepping up to tackle this thorny issue head on.

Mendeley is sponsoring this debate on the 23rd October 2014, which hopefully will spark some lively discussion and offer useful insights. Jan Reichelt, Co-founder and president of Mendeley will be opening up proceedings by addressing the assembly and Gabriel Hughes, who has a long tradition of working with Big Data and Analytics in companies like Google, Elsevier, and now Mendeley will give his personal perspective on some possible solutions. He will be joining other prominent speakers who will argue both sides of the issue.

The full line-up will be announced shortly and the event will also be live streamed. To be kept up-to-date with the latest and join the discussion make sure to join the Mendeley Right to be Forgotten group, and follow @mendeley_com @gabehughes or @alicebonasio on Twitter.

No time to learn new software? Let us teach you! New webinars for librarians and professors on 12/13 and 12/14.

If you’re like most people I know, you’d like to keep up with technology, but you just don’t have the time to sit down and spend a few hours learning how to use a new application. We understand. Give us an hour on the 13th or 14th and we’ll get you up and running, so you can enjoy the productivity enhancement with minimal time investment.

There will be two sessions, both at 2 PM EST on December 13 & 14. The first session will focus more on topics relevant to librarians, while the second one is designed for researchers in academic institutions. Both sessions will be introductory and suitable for folks with no prior experience, but will also give updates on getting the most out of newly released features. Please download and install Mendeley before the session so if you have any questions you’ll be able to ask them during the event.

We’ll discuss topics such as:Read More »

Join us for Alternative Metrics and the Future of Open Access, a conversation with Pete Binfield & Jason Hoyt, on 2011-10-27 at 1 PM EDT

Mendeley has some great events lined up for Open Access Week. William Gunn (Head of Academic Outreach) will be speaking at Open Science Summit the weekend of the 22nd, at the PLoS Open Access Week event with Heather Joseph on the 24th, at the UC Davis event on the 25th, and Mendeley NYC is hosting a online webcast with Pete Binfield (Managing Editor, PLoS) and Jason Hoyt (Research Director, Mendeley).

The Mendeley event will be conducted online via WebEx at 1 PM EDT on October 27.

Pete will discuss how the alternative metrics for impact that PLoS provides gives new insight into how OA content is used and shared. Jason will talk about how Mendeley built one of the world’s largest open catalogs of research and why that presents a perfect use case for Open Access.

We will put up a recording of the session afterwards, so check this post or our Youtube channel.

Registration is open until Oct 27

Date: Thursday, Oct 27th 2011
Time: 1:00 PM EDT
Presenter: Pete Binfield and Jason Hoyt


Read More »

Come learn how research is changing at the 2011 Open Science Summit on Oct 22-23 in Mountain View

The Open Science Summit brings together researchers, life science industry professionals, students, patients and other stakeholders to discuss the future of collaborative science and innovation. This year features in depth sessions on new models for drug discovery and clinical trials, personal genomics, the patent system, the future of scientific publications, and more. I went last year and made some good friends and learned a lot, so I would definitely recommend it to anyone involved in scientific research.

What: Open Science Summit
When: Saturday and Sunday, October 22-23rd 2011
Where: Computer History Museum, Mountain View, CA

p.s. All attendees get a special thank you gift from Mendeley, and there will also be some fun extracurricular activities, so don’t miss this.