Developing a Global Education Ethos: We've teamed up with Think Global UK Japan

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Think Global UK Japan is a the first UK-Japan Forum on International Perspectives in Education, and will host its first events in Japan during August 2015. The aims of this organisation is to facilitate an exchange of ideas between Japanese and British teachers, to encourage a global outlook in the classroom, for both students and teachers, to embed a global perspective in teacher professional development in Japan and the UK, and to promote gender equality in education and in global leadership

During the events this August, teachers from the UK and Japan will meet in forums and seminars in Fukushima, Kyoto and Tokyo. They will exchange ideas and resources about how to encourage and develop a global ethos among teachers and students with the aim of developing a programme of forums in the UK and in Japan, and to offer seminars and training for teachers.

Today’s guest blog post comes from this new Mendeley partner as we work to support the development of a global education ethos to benefit both teachers and students.

The Think Global UK Japan Project is delighted to team up with Mendeley, who will be sponsoring their venture in Japan this summer, and working together for future events in the UK. Lizzy Murdock, Head of Biology at a London school and member of the Think Global team, came across Mendeley at a Pint of Science event and instantly saw the opportunity for a productive partnership with them.

There is a demand for access to research papers among teachers in the UK, and the need for a network to share this information. Mendeley could help bridge the gap between research institutions and schools, and allow teachers and researchers to communicate directly and share ideas. It could also easily allow this collaboration to happen on an international level, and offer a forum for discussion around areas of common interest and the research that informs these interests.

The Think Global team will be in Japan this August delivering workshops at three venues – in Fukushima, Kyoto and Tokyo. The workshops are for Japanese teachers and are all based on the theme of global citizenship and international awareness. The members of the Think Global team will be exploring these ideas through the perspectives of science, languages, humanities and technology. Representatives of Japanese universities will also be present at the workshops, and the team hope to build link with teacher training colleges and other Higher Education establishments as well as with schools across Japan.

There is a long history of research collaboration between the UK and Japan, extending back to the Meiji era when small groups of Japanese came to study at UCL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/about/japanese-pioneers . This project is a direct descendant of those programmes 150 years ago. It evolved naturally from the UK Japan Young Scientist Workshops, where British and Japanese students get together at top research institutions in the UK and Japan (such as Cambridge and Kyoto universities) to participate in real research projects with scientists. The teachers accompanying the students started to discuss teaching and learning in the two countries and saw the need for a separate event to develop ideas and share resources. This year sees the launch of the Think Global project, but there are already plans for a series of conferences and workshops in the UK next year, and talk of extending the programme so that in the future it is truly global. One way of doing this will be through the creation of an online forum for discussion for teachers.

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If you are interested in finding out more about the Think Global UK Japan Forum, please have a look at our website, or contact the organiser at rgallagher@thomas-hardye.net.

An advocate for encouraging more women into scientific research and STEM careers, in Japan Lizzy will be discussing how we can promote the sciences to girls as educators. Excitingly, the project will also be linking up with the World Assembly for Women in Tokyo – a global forum for discussion on how to promote “a society where women shine”. If you are interesting in this aspect of the project or in her workshop on bridging the gap between high school and university science, then contact her at e.murdock@skhs.net.

Let’s talk about science – Researchers’ Choice Award for science communication

Albert Einstein once famously claimed that “you don’t really understand something unless you can explain it to your grandmother.” Living this ethos, a new breed of fresh-faced, tech-savvy researchers are on a mission to break down the barriers and bring science to the masses.

Communication is forming a bigger part of the role of researchers, and for those in the early stages of their career, it can have a potentially huge influence on the trajectory of their career. Alongside the life-changing scientific research taking place every day, there’s also a lot of impressive communication effort in the background – how else would we know about it? And we think it’s about time these researchers get the recognition they deserve.

We’re looking for early career researchers who are brilliant at communicating their scientific ideas to the public. They must be currently living in the UK, affiliated with a UK university and have begun publishing no earlier than 2012. We want to see evidence that they have gone above and beyond the publication of their research paper, and used any kind of public activity to address misleading information about scientific or medial issues; bring sound evidence to bear in a public or policy debate or helped people to make sense of a rather complex scientific issue.

There are no restrictions on what or how – simply visit the dedicated Mendeley group and enter the researcher’s name, age, institute and the reason for the nomination, along with links to supporting evidence such as a blog, Twitter account or YouTube video.

We then encourage all nominees (and their nominators) to invite peers and colleagues to ‘like’ their nomination post – those posts with the most likes will make the shortlist, which will be put in front of our specially selected judging panel.

So, if you know someone who has the potential to be the next Brian Cox, why not give them the chance of receiving the recognition they deserve…and £1,500! Nominations are open until 30th September 2015, and the winner will be announced at this year’s Awards ceremony at the Royal Society in London on 5th November.

You can read more about the importance of science communication, and if you have any questions on the Awards or the nomination process, feel free to post on the group and we’ll get back to you.

Watch Buzz Aldrin's upcoming talk, courtesy of Mendeley

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Mendeley is really excited to be sponsoring another space-themed event at the Cambridge Union Society.

Following last month’s debate, which discussed whether space exploration was worth the cost, this Saturday (March 14th) we are proudly sponsoring a talk by the second man to walk on the moon, Buzz Aldrin! The event will start at 13:00 GMT and will include a Q&A with the famous moonwalker.

We’d like to offer the Mendeley community the opportunity to “attend” this wonderful occasion by watching the live stream of the event. Simply login into the Cambridge Union Society streaming service with the following details:

Username: Mendeley
Password: livestream

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For those of you in or near the Cambridge area, here is the Facebook event page for details and directions to the venue.

Enjoy!

Thirsty for Science: Mendeley teams up with Pint of Science

Cracking the Code credit Andrew Steele
Photo Credit: Andrew Steele

Some of the best scientific discoveries have occurred over a pint. The Eagle in Cambridge is famous for Watson and Crick’s custom, while an unnamed Mendeley Advisor has confessed to me that some of his best scientific collaborations and discussions occur during his institute’s weekly “beer hour.”

So what better way to discuss and learn the latest science in layman’s terms than over a pint of…well, a pint of your choice! Mendeley is about changing the way we do research, and Pint of Science is about changing the way we discuss research, so it was a clear win on both sides when we decided to team up and sponsor Pint of Science, including the upcoming Pint of Science Festival this May.




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Pint of Science co-founders Praveen Paul and Michael Motskin tell us more about this exciting partnership:

 

Pint of Science is delighted to team up with Mendeley this year to deliver our most popular theme in the festival ‘Beautiful Mind’. Beautiful Mind encapsulates anything that is happening in our incredible brains (well, most of our brains); neural connections, psychological curiosities, how neuron wiring affects who we are and what happens when this goes wrong. Some of the best scientists in the UK will present talks on how drugs affect your brain, why people get depressed, how we recognise faces, how aging affects the brain and many more mind blowing talks. Now you understand why it’s our most popular theme!

Pint of Science Logo with GlassesPint of Science and Mendeley is a natural collaboration. The Pint of Science team has over 300 volunteer organisers based across 17 universities in the UK. Our organisers are mainly postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers who are familiar with using Mendeley for managing references, papers and initiating collaborations. We are excited to work together and we hope it will continue for the years to come.

The partnership with Mendeley started by a chance conversation at an art fair between Mandy Knapp and a Mendeley fan. Mandy is an artist helping curate a unique art event ‘Creative Reactions’ for Pint of Science this year. Taking place in Cambridge, local artists have been invited to get involved with speakers and produce artworks to represent the 18 different Pint of Science events that will be happening in the city. We are thrilled to see the final exhibition in Cambridge on the 21st May.

Let me tell you a little bit more about Pint of Science. The festival takes place 18-20 May 2015. We will have around 400 scientists who will switch their lab coats for pints and come share and explain their research to the public in over 60 pubs across the UK. Each day of the festival has a wide selection of talks that will quench your thirst for knowledge. The events will take place in: Bath, Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Glasgow, London, Manchester, Oxford, Southampton, Teesside and York.

What’s also special about Pint of Science is that it is an international collaboration, and while the festival is running in 11 cities in the UK, it will also be held simultaneously in 30 other cities across another 8 countries that take part in the festival. You can find more information at www.pintofscience.com.

Quiz time in the Pub credit Andrew Steele
Photo Credit: Andrew Steele

Our mission is to bring people as close as possible to the primary source of knowledge. So close that you will be able to have a chat and drink with the speaker. Each evening you can expect at least two experts presenting their research, yet every event at Pint of Science will be different. They will vary greatly and will include engaging talks, discussion panels, demonstrations, live experiments and science comedy. Between talks you can expect fun quizzes, geeky puzzles, engaging stories and other interactive activities.

Now that you know all about it and you’re feeling a bit thirsty for fresh knowledge (and a drink) come and join us for the biggest and cosiest science festival out there: Pint of Science, 18-20 May 2015 around the corner in your local pub.

 

We hope you can join Mendeley and Pint of Science for a pint of (beer/juice/coffee/etc) this May. Which talk are you most looking forward to attending?