Meet the Team: Susan Tyler Jenkins

Name: Susan Tyler Jenkins

Job title: Researcher Community Advisor, Mendeley Community Management Team

Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

I have a research background in art history and communication, and I worked in various roles for both community and corporate organizations in the US and Europe. My current interest is in the crossover fields of eco-psychology and contemplative practices, and the impact of green spaces on human health and urban societies. I’m also a meditation teacher with training in Buddhist study and practice. I spend my free time making wilderness walks and art.

When did you join Mendeley?

March of this year! I’m still getting acquainted.

What do you love most about your job?

I love being part of a delightful team that is supporting the development and furthering of knowledge in the world.

What book did you most recently read?

I often have two or three things going at once, in totally different genres. “Underground: A Human History of the Worlds Beneath Our Feet” by Will Hunt is a recent book on how connected we are through our explorations of caves, subways, and other places within the earth, told through a series of ever richer expeditions by the author, beginning when he was a teenager and discovered a hidden tunnel near his house. I also recently finished an audio version of the Chinese classic “The Romance of the Three Kingdoms,” which gives a lot of insight into the historical period at the end of the Han Dynasty (~180 – 260 CE) that gave China several of its most revered heroes.

What’s one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

That it’s not only a great way to find ideas for your research but also a way to build a network with people who have like-minded interests.

How would you explain your job to a stranger on a bus?

I support researchers from institutions all over the world in connecting with each other and in understanding the many ways that they can use the research tools and networks Mendeley has built.

What’s the most exciting part of your job?

I find meeting new people from all corners of the world to be the top perk, followed by seeing where new paths are (e)merging in research fields.

What keeps you awake at night?

Listening to too many podcasts!

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

The difference between a moor and a fen, both British English terms for types of peaty landscapes found in the British Isles. The British have so many words for describing different landscapes that we don’t have in American English, despite America having such a diversity of landscapes itself. Both the landscape and the language are fascinating to know.

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