Advisor of the Month – Chinwe Chukwudi

We’re delighted to introduce Dr. Chinwe Chukwudi, Senior Lecturer of Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology at the University of Nigeria in Nsukka. Chinwe is currently a visiting fellow of the African Postdoctoral Training Initiative (APTI) at the Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland (USA).

Where did you start your research journey?

My research journey started at the Royal Veterinary College, University of London where I obtained my PhD in Molecular biology and Microbial genetics, and subsequently did my first postdoc, both sponsored by the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission in the UK.

While growing up in a semi-urban community in South East Nigeria, I had a first-hand experience of the impact of infectious disease burden in Africa. Knowing that the sufferings caused could be alleviated with dedicated research into these diseases spurred my interest in researching on therapeutics/interventions for infectious diseases.

What is your favorite place to work?

A scientific laboratory and/or classroom, anywhere in the world!

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

11 years (since 2011)

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Endnote

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

To help others unlock the immense benefits of using Mendeley for reference management.

Teaching Mendeley at University of Nigeria Nsukka in 2021

What is the most important thing about Mendeley that you think people should know?

It’s free and easy to use.

Is there a researcher you admire (dead or alive) that you would like to work with or meet, and why?

Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, USA who discovered the CRISPR/Cas9 genetic scissors that have revolutionized genome editing.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

I was at a drug repurposing conference this week, and realized how much the little we do as scientists could impact the lives of people/populations we may never know, and how much some of these people are helplessly waiting for us (scientists) to ‘discover’ a cure for their ailment.

What is the best part about working in research?

You get to explore your imagiNATION and make impact in the lives of people doing that.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Having no defined work time….you have to work in and out of ‘normal’ working time, including through the nights, weekends and public holidays!

Levity in the lab: a few favorite organisms decorating a mask.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Research is a commitment to serve humanity, and that should be the driving force and yardstick for the measurement of success for young researchers.


You can follow Chinwe and her work by visiting her LinkedIn profile, ResearchGate profile, or searching her OrchidID. Curious about the Mendeley Advisor program? visit our website.

Advisor of the Month: Bertha Santos

We’re pleased to introduce April’s Mendeley Advisor of the Month, Bertha Santos!

Bertha is an Assistant Professor of Transport Infrastructure Engineering in the Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture at the University of Beira Interior in Covilhã, Portugal.

How did you get into your field? 

I have always been fascinated by civil construction. When the opportunity arose to study civil engineering, I discovered my interest in the field of transportation engineering, in which I have been researching and teaching since 1998. Maintenance of transport infrastructures, road user costs, road safety and sustainable mobility are topics of my interest. 

Where do you prefer to work? 

I especially enjoy working at my university, surrounded by and interacting with colleagues and students. 

How long have you been using Mendeley?  

About 4-5 years. 

What were you using prior to Mendeley? 

I was using EndNote. 

Why did you decide to become an Advisor? 

As a higher education teacher, adequate referencing of scientific and technical documents is essential for me. To make students aware of this important aspect, and to support them in the use of referencing tools as a way to fight plagiarism, I became a Mendeley Advisor. 

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive, and why? 

I would like to meet and work with transportation researchers from around the world to exchange knowledge, experiences and understand their perspectives. Among the leading researchers in the field of transportation, I would like to work with Prof. Gerardo W. Flintsch of Virginia Tech and Prof. Fred Mannering of University of South Florida-Tampa, and continue to work with Prof. Luís Picado-Santos of Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon. 

What’s the most interesting book or article you’ve read recently? 

I have recently read several interesting documents on European strategies and policies to promote sustainable mobility in urban areas, especially those related to cycling and pedestrian transport modes. For those interested in this topic, I recommend reading: 

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week? 

Once again, I realized that perseverance and hard work are essential for our personal and professional evolution. 

What is the best part about working in research? 

Discovering new things and solving problems that help ensure people better living conditions. 

And the most challenging part about working in research? 

To convey research findings in a clear and supported way and inspire young researchers. Mendeley can help address these challenges. 

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley? 

I would like people to know that Mendeley is a precious tool that can be used in the process of researching, organizing, analyzing and referencing the information consulted in a given research area.

Do you have any advice for young researchers?  

My advice is don’t give up and enjoy the investigation process as much as possible. These are the two fundamental pillars of success in research. 


You can follow Bertha by viewing her profile on LinkedIn. Curious about becoming a Mendeley Advisor? Visit https://www.mendeley.com/advisor-community to learn more.

Advisor of the Month – Devarajan Rathish

Meet Devarajan Rathish, our July Advisor of the Month! 

Advisor of the Month - Devarajan Rathish
Advisor of the Month – Devarajan Rathish

Dr. Devarajan Rathish is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, located in the Anuradhapura district in North Central Sri Lanka. He studied medicine (MBBS), completed his master’s degree in public health (MPH) at EUCLID University and obtained a master of philosophy (MPhil) at the Rajarata University of Sri Lanka.

How did you get into your field?

I like teaching, treating, and researching. Also, I had a passion to work in a rural region of my country. Therefore, I choose to become a Lecturer in a faculty of medicine located in a rural region. And, now I am happy teaching medical students, treating patients, and doing research in Anuradhapura. My fields of interest are Pharmacology, Primary Care, Public Health, and Medical Ethics. 

Where do you do work the best?

I feel fortunate to work in fields that focus on broader aspects of medicine. It has given me an opportunity to achieve a diversity of knowledge. Further, I prefer to work in an environment where my teammates have competency, a strong sense of companionship, and a good work ethic. 

How long have you been using Mendeley?

I have been using Mendeley for six years. Since June 2015, I have been a Mendeley Advisor. I am happy to have introduced Mendeley to many undergraduates, postgraduates, and academic staff members of Sri Lanka. 

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

I used to make references manually. Thanks to my Mendeley advisor Dr. Buddhika Wijerathne (my previous colleague and now a general practitioner at Ropes Crossing Medical Practice, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia), I could learn Mendeley at the very beginning of my career. 

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

To share the treasure that I found – “Mendeley”. The need for Mendeley was felt by many of my academic colleagues who are involved in research work. Also, annual workshops on Mendeley had to be conducted as part of the “Research in medicine” module for the 3rd year medical undergraduates at the university. Thus, my role as an official Mendeley advisor was important. I extend my gratitude to the team Mendeley for extending their continuous support. They register my workshops on time and provide useful materials and merchandise as well. 

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

I would like to meet and work with Dr. David Nalin, Professor Emeritus, Center for Immunology and Microbial Diseases, Albany Medical College. He along with Dr. Richard Cash, and their colleagues “successfully tested the efficacy of an oral glucose-electrolyte solution, later known as oral rehydration therapy (ORT), to be used instead of intravenous fluid for the treatment of patients with severe cholera”. The Lancet called it “… possibly the greatest medical discovery of this century. And, the UNICEF describes its value as follows: “no other single medical breakthrough of the 20th century has the potential to prevent so many deaths, over such a short period of time and at so little cost”. The above are compelling reasons for my willingness to meet and work with him. 

What book are you reading at the moment? 

I am reading John Murtagh’s General Practice. The textbook describes the essentials of general practice in depth. It’s a great read for anyone that aspires to progress as a family physician, and I would recommend it to my colleagues and students. 

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

The new variants of Coronavirus. There will be a lot more to learn on the above topic during the next few months as well. 

What is the best part about working in research?

I like reviewing and referencing. It helps me broaden my existing knowledge.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Finding suitable collaborations and research grants have always been a challenge. However, once the above two are finalized the journey is much easier.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is a high-quality reference manager provided free of charge for all. 

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

“Research is seeing what everybody else has seen and thinking what nobody else has thought.” – Albert Szent-Györgyi (1893-1986) 


Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor? Learn more about the Advisor Community.

Advisor of the month: Nick Hood

Nick HoodWhat is your name and job title?

My name is Nick Hood and I am a Senior Teaching Fellow in Secondary Education.

Where do you work?

I work at the Moray House School of Education and Sport at the University of Edinburgh.

How did you get into your field?

I took the long way round. I spent some years in the military and aerospace before starting my own software business. Part of that business involved training others in programming and data manipulation, and that led me to become a physics and mathematics teacher. I moved into teacher education about eight years ago.

Where do you do work the best?

Honestly, I think my best work is in supporting people who find our programmes challenging. Part of my job is as a personal tutor, where I get to work one-to-one with people who struggle with aspects of our very intensive postgraduate courses. Sometimes this is more pastoral, but often it is about getting to grips with academic writing.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

About eight years.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Good old manual methods. I just typed what I wanted on the page.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

A friend and colleague was our local Mendeley Advisor and when she hinted that she would retire, I thought I’d step up.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

A scientist who had an idea that saved millions of lives, Robert Watson-Watt. Or, if I am allowed a fictional researcher, Hari Seldon from Asimov’s Foundation series of stories.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Barthes, R. (1980) Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, Hill and Wang.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

How to take photographs in infrared.

What is the best part about working in research?

I like learning how to manipulate and present data for understanding – sometimes that is a matter of drawing a picture.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Getting away from distractions that frustrate understanding of the thing you are trying to make sense of. We all know that moment when we can almost clearly see some complex idea, when we are so close that we can nearly touch it – and the email pings, or a knock at the door collapses it all like a house of cards.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is the smart choice for the complex task of managing your sources when writing for academic or professional purposes.

Do you have any advice for young researchers? 

Get organised early. Establish your workflow. Use tools that get out of the way of your research activities and your data.


Find out more about Nick by following and viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

 

Advisor of the Month: Andi Anto Patak

What is your name and job title?

My name is Andi Anto Patak and I am a senior lecturer at Universitas Negeri Makassar in Indonesia.

How did you enter your field and what is your research focus?

I completed my Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in English Education at Universitas Negeri Makassar, then went on to a Ph.D. in Measurement and Evaluation at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.

The development of extensive literacy and research has interested me for many years. I have published several Mendeley-themed papers in Scopus-indexed journals as well as two books about Mendeley, which both came out in 2012. My first was also the first ever Indonesian-language book about Mendeley (*editor’s note: maybe even the first book about Mendeley!*). It had a print run of 1,000: 300 copies were sold and 700 were distributed free to students and lecturers.

My second book was also in Indonesian and also had a print run of 1,000. With this book, 500 copies were sold and the remaining 500 were distributed free. Digital versions of both books are available online and for free.

Here are links to my books:

Mendeley: Citation & PDF Reference Manager plus Jejaring Sosial by Andi Anto Patak, Erwin Akib – Books on Google Play (published in 2012).

Hindari Plagiat dengan Mendeley by Andi Anto Patak, Erwin Akib – Books on Google Play (Published in 2015)

I hope that everyone who has a passion for writing can have easy access to Mendeley. My current research is focused on developing a Mendeley-based thesis submission model that helps to avoid plagiarism.

What is your history with Mendeley?

I have used Mendeley for more than eight years. In the first year of my PhD, I used EndNote. For a short while after I discovered Mendeley, I used the two solutions together. Then I found that reference management was simpler with Mendeley — it was more user friendly for writing dissertations and papers too. So I switched full time to Mendeley.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

Because I find Mendeley easy to use, I decided to become a Mendeley Advisor. I’m able to invite fellow international students in Malaysia and my colleagues in Indonesia to jointly use Mendeley for writing dissertations, articles, research papers and other publications.

What academics, researchers or librarians would you like to work with or meet?

Professor Wendy Sutherland Smith of Deakin University, Australia, who pioneered research on plagiarism.

What is the best part of working in research?

The best part of being a researcher is finding the gaps in knowledge where we can research. Also, I like when we can find the full text of all the relevant references for a research project!

And the most challenging part?

The most challenging part is trying to work with participants who do not honestly respond to data collection.

What is one thing that you want people to know about Mendeley?

I created a Facebook group to let people know about Mendeley events in Indonesia and get feedback from Indonesian Mendeley users. You can find it here: Indonesian Mendeley Community.

Find out more about Andi by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Advisor of the Month: Yahaya Gavamukulya

Editor’s note:  We’d like to congratulate Dr. Gavamukulya on finishing his PhD and inspiring a new group of Mendeley Advisors!

What is your name and job title?

I am Dr Gavamukulya Yahaya (PhD), a Lecturer in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Busitema University, Mbale – Uganda. I am also a dynamic Global Mendeley Advisor.

How did you get into your field?

Quite a very long story, but to sum it all up, passion led me where I am and has helped me stay here.

Where do you work the best?

In an environment with people who not only take me as a colleague, but get to learn and understand each and every one as an individual yet moving together as a team. Reciprocally, I really enjoy knowing everyone in my work environment as a person rather than just knowing them as colleagues, students, peers among others.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I have been using Mendeley for 6 years, 4 of which have been as an Advisor.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

It’s quite embarrassing, but I was adding references manually without any reference manager.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

With resources on the website, I taught myself how to use Mendeley and it took me some time before perfecting it. Once I perfected and became experienced in all the features, and with the gaps analysis in the communities I was living in, I decided to enroll as an Advisor in order to help train and enroll as many people as possible in order for them not to go through what I used to go through prior to discovering Mendeley. Additionally, research being at the core of our training, having a resource person with interest and expertise in guiding learners through Mendeley becomes an added advantage to the Institutions. I have so far recruited, enrolled and trained more than 1,700 Mendeley users globally.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Prof Kary Banks Mullis (December 28, 1944 – August 7, 2019), just to thank him for the revolutionary technology of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).

What is the best part about working in research?

Navigating uncharted waters and eventually creating a trail…

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Uncertainty…

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Mendeley is here to accompany them through the entire research journey.

Do you have an advice for young researchers? 

Passion, Passion, Passion, Patience, Perseverance and the correct team… It shall keep you there even when the going gets tough.

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Find out more about Dr. Gavamukulya by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here.

Join the Mendeley Advisors

Mendeley Advisor Community logo_ColorIn 2019, we welcomed tens of thousands of new users to Mendeley and the magic of good reference management. When it comes to discovering the platform, one of the best ways is through our brilliant Mendeley Advisor Community, which goes beyond recommendation to support users worldwide.

We are actively recruiting new Advisors for 2020. Could you be the next great Mendeley Advisor?

The Mendeley Advisor Community includes people from all over the world. Most Advisors are PhD students and early-career lecturers, but the community also includes librarians, tenured professors, government lab employees and corporate researchers.

Mendeley Advisors are the voice of Mendeley on campus, helping their peers use its great features to save time and reduce stress levels. They share their knowledge of Mendeley in classes, office hours and fun events on campus!

In 2019, the Advisors spread their love of Mendeley in all sorts of ways, including:

Besides the satisfaction that comes from helping your peers, Advisors receive a whole range of benefits, such as:

  • Increased free library storage
  • A coveted Mendeley T-shirt
  • Giveaways for your workshops
  • Invitations for speaking opportunities and to be profiled on Elsevier blogs
  • Sneak previews of new Mendeley products and features
  • A certificate to acknowledge your contribution to the community
  • Support, advice and collateral from the Mendeley Community team
  • Invitations to do UX and BETA testing, so you can be part of Mendeley’s development

It’s so easy to apply to be a Mendeley Advisor: just click here.

We’re looking forward to welcoming you to the Community.

Advisor of the Month: Felix Oke

Felix Oke: Anchor University, Lagos, Nigeria 

How did you get into your field and what is your research story?

I undertake research in linguistics with a focus on media studies. Recently, I have got a deep insight into an emerging field called digital humanities.

My research career began while I was working on my final year project as an undergrad. I enjoyed the affordances there are in carrying out field work in linguistics. Next, I engaged with a robust and more detailed research project in medical linguistics. Recently, my research activities have revolved around media discourse and digital humanities with special interest in digitising images of cultural heritage in Nigeria.

Where do you do your research? What kind of environment suits you?

As a faculty staff member, I make use of my office in Lagos, Nigeria and sometimes in the library. I enjoy the serenity of my workplace. In a few occasions, I take a research retreat.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I started using Mendeley in 2016.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Due to my passion for referencing, I engaged in the manual way of documenting sources judiciously. Since the time I came across Mendeley, my research experience has changed tremendously.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor and how are you involved with the program?

I was surprised by the wonders of Mendeley, so I decided to learn and master the software. Also, I have passion in reaching out to researchers who don’t have the knowledge of any reference manager in my country.

I love referencing generally. I was part of a team of developers put together to work on the style sheet for referencing online data. I have taught that aspect of referencing with graduate students as part of their requirements for a course in methodology. I have also taught Mendeley in our Summer School on Digital Humanities, to the ICT staff of University and to other faculty and doctoral researchers.

Which researcher would you most like to work with, dead or alive?

The researcher I would like to work with is James Cummings, Newcastle, UK. He is a digital humanist who specialises in coding, mining and visualising humanities data.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Currently, I am reading Goals by Brian Tracy. I would like to learn more about attaining to one’s life goals.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve done this week?

Teaching referencing to graduate students of the University of Lagos, Akoka, Nigeria, who have no prior knowledge of a reference manager like Mendeley.

What is the best part about working in research?

What I enjoy the most in research is the aspect of data interpretation or discussion.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

The most challenging part of research is data gathering.

What is one Mendeley “ProTip” you have?

I have discovered, over the years in Mendeley, the intricacy of what is called the “metadata”.

Biography

I am a doctoral candidate from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria and a lecturer in the Department of Languages and Linguistics from Anchor University, Lagos, Nigeria. My research interest borders on the intersection between language studies and digital software.

In my ongoing doctoral thesis titled “Construction of Identity and Ideology in Nigerian News Reports on Boko Haram Insurgency”, I have been able to show the trajectory of news discourse, critical discourse analysis and multimodal digital humanities in terrorism discourse. Recently, I have undertaken a research project on digitisation of cultural heritage in Nigeria.

Editor’s Note: Felix is too modest to say it here, but he has been working with his university to set up a Mendeley learning lab! We think this is pretty cool.

Find out more about Felix by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here

We hit another Advisor milestone!

Once a month, we like to comb through the Mendeley Advisor statistics to see if there’s anything we can learn about how we can make the program even better. (We also like to see if we’ve hit another milestone that we should celebrate with cake.)

And right now, the biggest milestone is the number of new Advisors in 2019!  We are pleased to say we have welcomed 1,045 new Mendeley Advisors to the community in 2019.

We’re also happy to see we have a good split of Advisors across the globe, with new Advisors based in 104 countries ranging from the Caribbean island of Saint Lucia to The Netherlands to Japan!

This chart shows the top 10 countries in terms of where new 2019 Advisors are based.

As always, we want to thank the Mendeley Advisors for sharing their love of Mendeley, and helping make reference management just a little easier!

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here

 

Advisor of the month: Virginia Ballance

Virginia BallanceVirginia Ballance is the Nursing and Health Sciences Librarian at the University of The Bahamas. She works in the Hilda Bowen Library at the nursing school campus in downtown Nassau Bahamas.

How did you get into your field?
I loved studying and working in the library while I was at university and after graduate school studies sort of moved seamlessly into librarianship.

Where do you do work best?
In the library.

How long have you been using Mendeley?
I set up an account several years ago mostly to try it out. Last year the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research suggested I offer a workshop on reference management – we selected Mendeley because of the great features.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?
Years ago I used EndNote but in recent years, embarrassed to say, I wasn’t using anything…

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?
The Mendeley Advisor programme encouraged me to really learn to use the product and exploit all its features as well as providing me with the training materials (presentations that could be customized, posters and certificates) needed to run a workshop. Being an Advisor puts you in contact with a fabulous group of Mendeley users all over the world to share experiences using Mendeley. There are other great benefits such as having a larger account size and greater number of Mendeley groups.

Which researcher would you most like to work with, dead or alive?
Hard question – to be honest, I really enjoy working with the students and faculty here at the University of The Bahamas.

What book are you reading at the moment?
Homo Deus by Yuval Noah Harari and about 10 other books…

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?
I discovered Google Crisis Maps. This is a special project which gives access to satellite images and maps specifically for emergency situations. I was amazed to see details of the extent of the devastation on the two islands in the Bahamas that were hit by Hurricane Dorian on September 1, 2019. https://www.google.org/crisismap/weather_and_events

What’s the best part about working in research?
Seeing your name in print! Getting cited!

And the most challenging part about working in research?
Procrastination. Making time in the day or the week to work on writing especially when there are so many distractions.

What’s the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?
It can make your scholarly writing so much easier…

Do you have any advice for young researchers?
Absolutely – be brave, go to conferences, present your ideas, network, work with your colleagues, and let the librarians in your institution know what you are working on.

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Watch Virginia give advice on the best methods and tools to effectively collect, organize and retrieve a personal knowledge base as part of Elsevier’s recent Build My Knowledge webinar

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here