Join the Mendeley Advisors

Mendeley Advisor Community logo_ColorIn 2019, we welcomed tens of thousands of new users to Mendeley and the magic of good reference management. When it comes to discovering the platform, one of the best ways is through our brilliant Mendeley Advisor Community, which goes beyond recommendation to support users worldwide.

We are actively recruiting new Advisors for 2020. Could you be the next great Mendeley Advisor?

The Mendeley Advisor Community includes people from all over the world. Most Advisors are PhD students and early-career lecturers, but the community also includes librarians, tenured professors, government lab employees and corporate researchers.

Mendeley Advisors are the voice of Mendeley on campus, helping their peers use its great features to save time and reduce stress levels. They share their knowledge of Mendeley in classes, office hours and fun events on campus!

In 2019, the Advisors spread their love of Mendeley in all sorts of ways, including:

Besides the satisfaction that comes from helping your peers, Advisors receive a whole range of benefits, such as:

  • Increased free library storage
  • A coveted Mendeley T-shirt
  • Giveaways for your workshops
  • Invitations for speaking opportunities and to be profiled on Elsevier blogs
  • Sneak previews of new Mendeley products and features
  • A certificate to acknowledge your contribution to the community
  • Support, advice and collateral from the Mendeley Community team
  • Invitations to do UX and BETA testing, so you can be part of Mendeley’s development

It’s so easy to apply to be a Mendeley Advisor: just click here.

We’re looking forward to welcoming you to the Community.

Advisor of the Month: Felix Oke

Felix Oke: Anchor University, Lagos, Nigeria 

How did you get into your field and what is your research story?

I undertake research in linguistics with a focus on media studies. Recently, I have got a deep insight into an emerging field called digital humanities.

My research career began while I was working on my final year project as an undergrad. I enjoyed the affordances there are in carrying out field work in linguistics. Next, I engaged with a robust and more detailed research project in medical linguistics. Recently, my research activities have revolved around media discourse and digital humanities with special interest in digitising images of cultural heritage in Nigeria.

Where do you do your research? What kind of environment suits you?

As a faculty staff member, I make use of my office in Lagos, Nigeria and sometimes in the library. I enjoy the serenity of my workplace. In a few occasions, I take a research retreat.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I started using Mendeley in 2016.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?

Due to my passion for referencing, I engaged in the manual way of documenting sources judiciously. Since the time I came across Mendeley, my research experience has changed tremendously.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor and how are you involved with the program?

I was surprised by the wonders of Mendeley, so I decided to learn and master the software. Also, I have passion in reaching out to researchers who don’t have the knowledge of any reference manager in my country.

I love referencing generally. I was part of a team of developers put together to work on the style sheet for referencing online data. I have taught that aspect of referencing with graduate students as part of their requirements for a course in methodology. I have also taught Mendeley in our Summer School on Digital Humanities, to the ICT staff of University and to other faculty and doctoral researchers.

Which researcher would you most like to work with, dead or alive?

The researcher I would like to work with is James Cummings, Newcastle, UK. He is a digital humanist who specialises in coding, mining and visualising humanities data.

What book are you reading at the moment?

Currently, I am reading Goals by Brian Tracy. I would like to learn more about attaining to one’s life goals.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve done this week?

Teaching referencing to graduate students of the University of Lagos, Akoka, Nigeria, who have no prior knowledge of a reference manager like Mendeley.

What is the best part about working in research?

What I enjoy the most in research is the aspect of data interpretation or discussion.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

The most challenging part of research is data gathering.

What is one Mendeley “ProTip” you have?

I have discovered, over the years in Mendeley, the intricacy of what is called the “metadata”.

Biography

I am a doctoral candidate from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria and a lecturer in the Department of Languages and Linguistics from Anchor University, Lagos, Nigeria. My research interest borders on the intersection between language studies and digital software.

In my ongoing doctoral thesis titled “Construction of Identity and Ideology in Nigerian News Reports on Boko Haram Insurgency”, I have been able to show the trajectory of news discourse, critical discourse analysis and multimodal digital humanities in terrorism discourse. Recently, I have undertaken a research project on digitisation of cultural heritage in Nigeria.

Editor’s Note: Felix is too modest to say it here, but he has been working with his university to set up a Mendeley learning lab! We think this is pretty cool.

Find out more about Felix by viewing his Mendeley profile.

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here

We hit another Advisor milestone!

Once a month, we like to comb through the Mendeley Advisor statistics to see if there’s anything we can learn about how we can make the program even better. (We also like to see if we’ve hit another milestone that we should celebrate with cake.)

And right now, the biggest milestone is the number of new Advisors in 2019!  We are pleased to say we have welcomed 1,045 new Mendeley Advisors to the community in 2019.

We’re also happy to see we have a good split of Advisors across the globe, with new Advisors based in 104 countries ranging from the Caribbean island of Saint Lucia to The Netherlands to Japan!

This chart shows the top 10 countries in terms of where new 2019 Advisors are based.

As always, we want to thank the Mendeley Advisors for sharing their love of Mendeley, and helping make reference management just a little easier!

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here

 

Advisor of the month: Virginia Ballance

Virginia BallanceVirginia Ballance is the Nursing and Health Sciences Librarian at the University of The Bahamas. She works in the Hilda Bowen Library at the nursing school campus in downtown Nassau Bahamas.

How did you get into your field?
I loved studying and working in the library while I was at university and after graduate school studies sort of moved seamlessly into librarianship.

Where do you do work best?
In the library.

How long have you been using Mendeley?
I set up an account several years ago mostly to try it out. Last year the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research suggested I offer a workshop on reference management – we selected Mendeley because of the great features.

What were you using prior to Mendeley?
Years ago I used EndNote but in recent years, embarrassed to say, I wasn’t using anything…

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?
The Mendeley Advisor programme encouraged me to really learn to use the product and exploit all its features as well as providing me with the training materials (presentations that could be customized, posters and certificates) needed to run a workshop. Being an Advisor puts you in contact with a fabulous group of Mendeley users all over the world to share experiences using Mendeley. There are other great benefits such as having a larger account size and greater number of Mendeley groups.

Which researcher would you most like to work with, dead or alive?
Hard question – to be honest, I really enjoy working with the students and faculty here at the University of The Bahamas.

What book are you reading at the moment?
Homo Deus by Yuval Noah Harari and about 10 other books…

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?
I discovered Google Crisis Maps. This is a special project which gives access to satellite images and maps specifically for emergency situations. I was amazed to see details of the extent of the devastation on the two islands in the Bahamas that were hit by Hurricane Dorian on September 1, 2019. https://www.google.org/crisismap/weather_and_events

What’s the best part about working in research?
Seeing your name in print! Getting cited!

And the most challenging part about working in research?
Procrastination. Making time in the day or the week to work on writing especially when there are so many distractions.

What’s the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?
It can make your scholarly writing so much easier…

Do you have any advice for young researchers?
Absolutely – be brave, go to conferences, present your ideas, network, work with your colleagues, and let the librarians in your institution know what you are working on.

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Watch Virginia give advice on the best methods and tools to effectively collect, organize and retrieve a personal knowledge base as part of Elsevier’s recent Build My Knowledge webinar

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here

Do you have enough chairs?

  We noticed an interesting trend in the Mendeley workshops you are running.  Not only are you running more events, but they also seem to be getting bigger!  (We wanted to start sending out chairs as merchandise to help you accommodate all those extra attendees, but the mailroom guys said “Nooooo.” Apparently, the mailroom isn’t big enough!)

We think this growth is brilliant and we wanted to share the numbers with you:

As of September 10, 2019, you have run 275 events with more than 17,000 attendees this year.  Sessions have an average of 63 attendees.  In all of 2018, we had 125 events with close to 7000 attendees.  The average was number of attendees 55.

Breaking it down by month, we see that there is a steady growth in the number of attendees per event.  In January 2019, the average event had 50 attendees and by September 2019, events had an average of 78 attendees.

What’s driving the growth? Librarians!  (We always knew we loved them.)  We had virtual coffees with a few librarian Advisors to find out how you run events.  While some of you are getting 200 people in a room for a class, most of you are doing a lot of one-on-one support through the reference desk but we are counting all the drop-in sessions as one event.

Lessons we learned:  Not all events look the same! Some are a traditional class, but some are more individual coaching sessions spread out over the entire semester. We love them all, so keep at it and let us know if you need a merchandise to support your drop-in sessions.

Regardless of the form your event takes, we are happy to support it.  To get merchandise and other support, register your event on the Mendeley Advisor Community page.

So it looks like maybe we don’t need more chairs yet, just bigger boxes to mail off all the merchandise!

 

 

Advisor of the month: Serge Kameni Leugoue

Editor’s note:  Serge helped welcome our 10,000th Advisor-generated user of 2019 in early June.

How did you get into your field and what is your research story?

I am involved in animal sciences, particularly animal reproduction research. I came across this research field because of my will to improve livestock practice in sub-Saharan Africa and especially in Cameroon. As a matter of fact, livestock remains labour intensive, leading to poor yield and subsequent insufficiency in protein availability on market regardless of the hard work of farmers. Furthermore, they solely rely on natural mating which limits their profits. Despite being on increasing pressure to farm as cost effective as possible, and taking into account the rapid increasing of population, producers are facing a critical challenge which on my view can be tackled using assisted reproductive techniques. My background is biology, indeed I obtained my bachelor with a major in animal physiology at the University of Dschang, Cameroon. I started a master’s in plant pharmacology, but I rapidly switched to animal sciences and I moved to South Africa, to the University of Stellenbosch where I have refined my knowledge and lab practice in animal sciences close to Dr. Helet Lambretchs who gave me, in collaboration with Dr. Gilbert Ateufack from the University of Dschang, the opportunity to be part of the amazing voyage to the unknown reality that science allows to illuminate. I am a PhD student in animal sciences at the University of Dschang, Cameroon and my research project focuses on small ruminant’s assisted reproduction. Currently, I am on a research stay at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, where we are working on the development of biodegradable food packaging.

Where do you do your research?

The research I am involved in requires me to be outside for sample collection and to be in the lab for analysis. I am at my ease in both sites, but I generally prefer to be outside because I can browse and appreciate the beautiful landscapes of Africa in miniature – Cameroon and breathe some fresh air.

How long have you been using Mendeley? 

I have been on Mendeley since 2015. Indeed, I was introduced to the software at the beginning of my master studies in South Africa by the librarian in charge of the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Stellenbosch and have used it ever since. I want to say thanks again to Yusuf, the librarian, it has been of great help and it’s still the case.

What were you using prior to Mendeley and how does Mendeley influence your research?

Before Mendeley, I was using the MS Word reference. Of course, it wasn’t that efficient. I remembered one day that my system crashed, I lost all my resources and I had to rebuild it from the beginning.

Mendeley has drastically changed my research, now I am safe from losing my resources, I can access them anytime and anywhere, and I receive consistent suggestions of research papers – no need to browse the whole internet to stay updated. In addition, I can connect with others, find careers and funding opportunities.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor?

I am part of those who believe that right tools should be shared with others. For me, Mendeley is one of these excellent tools, that is the reason why I decided to become an Advisor and assist others to be more efficient by optimizing their research work with Mendeley.

What researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Tu Youyou. She is the first Chinese woman to win a Nobel Prize in 2015 for her work in creating an anti-malaria drug that saved millions of lives in Asia and Africa. She relied on traditional Chinese medicine in her discovery of artemisinin and dihydroartemisinin, which have helped significantly improve the health of people living in tropical climates. She made me think of the year I worked in plant pharmacology.

What book are you reading at the moment and why?

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. Recently, I attended a training course in France where we discussed cell culture and of course Hela cells. I then dug a bit about the origin of those cells and I found that they were derived from the cancer cells of Henrietta Lacks. The title of this book is just fascinating “immortal life” it effectively highlights how we have been moved forward with research – opening novel perspectives.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

Life is really an adventure and should not be taken as a long and calm stream. Whatever the challenge you meet, keep going, you won’t win anytime but do your best.

What is the best part about working in research?

Without hesitation, being at the forefront of pushing the world forward by trying to improve living conditions, bringing your own stone to the big building.

And the most challenging part about working in research?

Patience, nowadays being patient is not that a shared value, especially when working in a team, yet research that produce actionable results requires time, thus patience.

What is one Mendeley “ProTip” you have? 

Being able to import the resources straight to the appropriate folder of the library using the web plugin. It’s really time saving as you can import and tidy up everything at once. I think also being able to share your unpublished data is an important point as generally most of the research is not published, but at least you can share it with others.

Serge’s Biography :

I obtained my High School certificate with a major in mathematics and physics and I then jumped in to university where I received my Bachelor Degree in Animal Physiology from the University of Dschang, Cameroon in 2011. I received my Postgraduate Diploma in 2012 and I moved to the University of Stellenbosch in the Republic of South Africa for a one-year research stay. Back in Cameroon, I completed my MSc in 2015 in the same field as my bachelor. While being a full-time PhD student at the University Dschang in Cameroon, I am currently on a 6-month research stay at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in Italy.

I am a member of the Cameroon Forum for Biological Sciences (CAFOBIOS).

I am a Mendeley Advisor!!!

I share a special interest for environment protection, so I am involved in several NGOs as United voices to Serve Forests and Environment (USFE) International, which is an organization that design and implement actions towards environment preservation.

I am an amateur chess player.

 

Interested in becoming a Mendeley Advisor yourself? Find out more about the Advisor Community here

Advisor of the Month: Gustavo Bernardi Pereira, Federal University of Paraná, Brazil

How did you get into your field and what is your research story?

Since my childhood, I have been passionate about learning how things work as well as any quirky stuff I can find. Because of this “quirky stuff” side, I ended up starting a bachelor in physics and maths. However, something was missing… the “how things work” side. So, I decided to change my degree to Industrial Engineering at Federal University of Parana.

In the meantime, I got a scholarship to study MEng. Manufacturing Engineering at the University of Warwick. Back to the quirky stuff… my project was called “Manufacture of functional polymer-composite materials for electromagnetic applications by extrusion”. Even though it was a challenging project, my supervisor at the time suggested I use a reference manager called “Mendeley”. As most of the students, I did not pay enough attention to her and made it without using it.

Back in Brazil I began a Masters in Process Mining. As soon as I started studying it, I realized that working only on the research itself would consume much more energy than I expected (as you often have to redo your work). At this point I decided to optimize my research process. And I decided to follow my former supervisor’s advice and start using Mendeley.

Where do you do your research/work the best? What kind of environment suits you?

Usually I like to balance two environments: loud and talkative (to generate the ideas) and quiet and surrounded by nature (to organise the ideas).

How long have you been on Mendeley? 

I first heard about it in 2013. However, it was only in 2016 I started exploring its features and using them effectively.

What were you using prior to Mendeley and how does Mendeley influence your research?

I used to have a notepad file with a list of references, which I pasted in to the document at the end. When I found out what Mendeley could do for my research, I must confess I was bit sceptical in the beginning. As I started using it, the intuitive environment changed my mind and now I am very comfortable about swapping my notepad to Mendeley.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor and how are you involved with the program?

Seeing my Master’s peers struggling to finish a 6 page assignment because of the references brought my attention to simple problems around me. So I became an Advisor and since then I have been holding teaching sessions for many groups in the university.

Which researcher would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?

Leonardo da Vinci is one researcher I would like to meet and work with. Possibly because of his broad range of skills in different areas.

What book are you reading at the moment and why?

Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely. The book talks about how decisions you assume are being made rationally sometimes are not really something you have a choice about.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned this week?

Well… some people say it is possible to use a biological virus to improve computing power hahaha https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsanm.8b01508

What is the best part about working in research?

Having your research used by someone else (to help someone, not to have citations) is the best part.

And the worst/most challenging part about working in research?

Dealing with egos, in my humble opinion, is the biggest challenge we have been facing in science as it jeopardises both the speed and the environment in which the research is made.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?

Unless your notepad file still can solve your problems, use Mendeley…. for the greater good.

 

Follow Gustavo on Mendeley

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