How a PhD prize is supporting chemistry’s bright young stars

By David Evans, Scientific Affairs Director at Reed Elsevier Properties SA

The fuel efficiency of our cars depends on the relative reactivity of the hydrocarbons in the fuel; in 2013 a PhD student published a paper describing a new material that can filter out the molecules that make our cars less efficient. A year later, a different PhD student published work that makes it possible to watch the tiny structures inside cells moving around in real-time, using a microscope.

Rising chemistry stars like these will be tomorrow’s leading scientists, developing solutions to many of the problems we face today. Recognizing their work and supporting their careers is vital, and that’s exactly what the Reaxys PhD Prize is for. The best known and respected of its kind, the Prize has attracted almost 2500 submissions from more than 400 universities in its six-year history.

Every year, 45 finalists are selected out of hundreds of submissions from chemistry PhD candidates and researchers who have recently been awarded their PhD, in a process managed by a review committee of renowned chemists. The finalists represent the world’s best young chemists, and their work is showcased at an annual Symposium.

Submissions are now open for the 2016 PhD Prize, and we’re preparing to see even more outstanding and impactful research this year.

Celebrating success
Imagine you’re just finishing your chemistry PhD and you’re standing at the foot of your career, wondering how you’ll be able to scale the mountain. You’ve done some really cutting-edge work already, but you have even bigger ideas. Now you need people to bounce them around with and a mentor to guide you.

The Reaxys PhD Prize gives exceptional young researchers a leg-up, helping them scale the difficult first part of their career and supporting them with lifetime benefits.

The two PhD students mentioned at the start of this article are previous PhD Prize winners and are now two of almost 300 members of an elite group – the Reaxys Prize Club. Each year the 45 new finalists are welcomed into the Prize Club, giving them the chance to network with some of the world’s best chemists.

The PhD Prize has been running since 2010, hence, Club members now hold a variety of positions in academia and industry, giving incoming members a great opportunity to find mentors and collaborators. Over 50 members are now in their first independent academic positions.

How it works
The 2016 PhD Prize is open to those who are in a chemistry PhD program or have completed their PhD after 1 January 2015, and who have published a peer-reviewed paper during their PhD. They apply online with their peer-reviewed paper, along with a CV (resume) and a letter of recommendation from their PhD supervisor.

Submissions are open until 8 February 2016, after this the review process will start, and once completed the review committee will select the 45 finalists. All 45 finalists automatically become members of the Reaxys Prize Club and a host of other benefits, including unlimited personal access to Reaxys and Reaxys Medicinal Chemistry and discounts on Elsevier Chemistry books and scientific conferences.

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All the finalists are invited to attend the 2016 Reaxys PhD Prize Symposium. Before the symposium, the review committee will publish a shortlist of applicants. At the Symposium, all the finalists will present their research at a poster session, and the shortlisted candidates will give oral presentations. The three winners will be chosen after the oral presentations and will each be awarded a cheque for $2000.

Are you up for the challenge? We are looking forward to seeing the exciting new research being done by today’s rising stars and to welcoming a new wave of members to the Reaxys Prize Club.

To stay updated on the finalists, shortlisted candidates and the winners, visit the PhD Prize website.

Four perspectives on communicating your research, and then one more. #EB2012

I recently had an opportunity to attend the Experimental Biology meeting in San Diego. The Experimental Biology comprises 7 scientific societies who come together to have one (HUGE!) meeting once a year. There was tons of interesting science reported, from the science of Yogic breathing to the effects of fructose on the body, but most relevant to the Mendeley community as a whole was the panel discussion on communicating your science. The panel included a Nobel Laureate, Paul Berg, Joe Palca from NPR’s Science Friday, Megan Palmer from SynBERC, and Cara Santa Maria from the Huffington Post. This was a diverse panel and got quite exciting towards the end.Read More »

Tracking Scholarly Impact on the Social Web: An #Altmetrics Workshop

New ways of getting your work noticed via the web has been a very frequent topic of our posts here. We’ve written about raising your online visibility, making your work more discoverable, and many other aspects of getting your work noticed online. That’s why it makes me very happy to announce that a workshop is being convened to discuss these very topics. At the 3rd International Conference on Web Science (14-15 June), a workshop on tracking scholarly impact on the social web has been organized. Read the post for more details.Read More »

Lord Martin Rees, Evan Harris, and Aleks Krotoski confirmed as keynote speakers at Science Online London 2010

We are honoured to announce that our Keynote Speakers for Science Online London 2010 are Lord Martin Rees, Evan Harris and Aleks Krotoski.

Widely acknowledged as one of the world’s preeminent cosmologists, Lord Martin Rees is Astronomer Royal, President of the Royal Society and Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at Trinity College, Cambridge – in addition to being a prolific author and speaker. He has received countless awards for his varied contributions to his field, and was this year elected to deliver the Reith Lectures for the BBC. Billed by TED as ‘one of our key thinkers on the future of humanity within the cosmos’, Lord Rees has also served on many bodies here in the UK and abroad, dealing with education and international collaboration in science.

Evan Harris was a doctor before entering politics, eventually becoming the Liberal Democrats’ Shadow Minister in the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills and Shadow Minister for Science until May this year. He remains a strong voice for science within Parliament.

Aleks Krotoski is an academic and journalist who writes about and studies technology and interactivity. For her PhD in Social Psychology, she examined how information spreads around the social networks of the World Wide Web. She writes regularly for the Guardian and the Observer, and hosts a technology podcast called Tech Weekly. Just this February, she presented The Virtual Revolution for BBC Two – a documentary about the social history of the Web.

This will again be an amazing conference, aimed at changing the face of science. We are still a month away from the conference and have few tickets left, so you need to move fast if you want to join us.

You can follow the conference on Twitter @soloconf (comment with hashtag #solo10).

Science Online London 2010 call for sponsors

Are you working for a company or institution in the field of science, or do you want to reach the thought leaders in science online? We are looking for sponsorship partners for our Science Online London 2010 conference on 3-4 September (Fri/Sat) at the British Library in St Pancras, London. Last year, our sponsors included institutions and companies like the Royal Institution of Great Britain, CrossRef, NESTA, AAAS/Science, and BioData.

As a sponsor, you will gain exposure to key scientific bloggers, communicators and thought leaders. Given the nature of the audience, we anticipate plenty of media coverage and ‘buzz’ through social media such as Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, FriendFeed and blogs. The conference is a golden opportunity to demonstrate that your company is a supporter of such tools for scientific communication, and a chance to promote your brands, products and services to an audience of passionate communicators.

If you would like to participate as a sponsor of Science Online London 2010 please contact Lou Woodley (l.woodley@nature.com).

Co-hosted by:

Science Online London 2010: Registration and Wiki

The registration for the Science Online London 2010 is now open!

There are only 95 days left until the conference starts in early September, so hurry up and grab your ticket from our registration website!

We are all very excited and looking forward to seeing you in London at the British Library!

Wiki page

We are organizing an action packed conference and we want your input to help shape the sessions. To this end, we have added a Wiki to the Science Online London website. Please use the Wiki to give us your suggestions and we will be looking at them continuously and integrate as many of them as possible.

For more information please visit the Science Online London 2010 website or directly go to the Wiki page.

And don’t forget to register at our registration website!

Co-hosted by:

Contact us:

Sponsor the conference:
Potential sponsors should contact Lou Woodley (l.woodley@nature.com).

General enquiries:
For general enquiries, please contact Sebastian Arcq (sebastian.arcq@mendeley.com).

: Follow @soloconf, hashtag #solo10

: Discuss in the Nature Network Forum

: Discuss in the Solo10 FriendFeed Room

Mendeley co-hosts Science Online London 2010

September 3-4, 2010 — British Library

We are delighted to announce that Nature Publishing Group, Mendeley, and the British Library will host Science Online London 2010 on 3-4 September (Fri/Sat) 2010. The event will take place at the British Library in St Pancras, London.

The event will bring together members of the scientific community who are interested in the use of web technologies for collaboration and communication. Science Online London will this year run over two days, building on the success of two previous one-day events held in 2009 and 2008. The British Library’s spacious facilities, with free wifi, on-site cafes and exhibitions, will also allow for a greater attendance.

Further details of the event will be announced via the official web site. Discussion of sessions, facilities and other matters can be found on the Nature Network forum. Follow the conference on Twitter @soloconf and comment with hashtag #solo10.

Details on how to register will follow shortly. To cover the increased costs of hosting the event, registration will cost £50.

For more information please visit the Science Online 2010 website.

Co-hosted by:

Contact us:

Sponsor the conference:
Potential sponsors should contact Lou Woodley (l.woodley@nature.com).

General enquiries:
For general enquiries, please contact Sebastian (sebastian.arcq@mendeley.com).

: Follow @soloconf, hashtag #solo10

: Discuss in the Nature Network Forum

: Discuss in the Solo10 FriendFeed Room