Finding your next job or funding opportunity has never been easier!

Mendeley’s latest machine learning innovations joins the power of AI with Mendeley Careers and Mendeley Funding. This new product development is not only set to give your career a boost, it is also set to save you huge amounts of time as it ploughs through hundreds of thousands of job and funding opportunities to find the perfect matches for you.

MendeleyCareersSuggest
Mendeley Careers Suggest

Our world of ‘information overload’ has never been more of a burden for researchers as it is today. And, just like commercial industries, academia too is under pressure to deliver more results with fewer resources. Technology is often where we turn to help us get there. Both Mendeley Careers and Mendeley Funding now harness machine learning to help researchers by suggesting job positions and funding opportunities that are most relevant to their interests and expertise.

With around 120,000 open job adverts at any given time, Mendeley Careers is the world’s largest free online search engine for job opportunities in science, technology, and engineering. This platform already saves time for hundreds of thousands of researchers who now only need to visit one website to discover the latest job opportunities in their field.

The recent implementation of machine learning recommender technology has taken this service to the next level; enter Mendeley Careers Suggest. Now, job opportunities that match your profile can land in your inbox, ready for you to digest after a busy day in the lab.

MendeleyFundingSuggest
Mendeley Funding Suggest

Similarly, researchers are under a tremendous amount of pressure to secure funding to continue their research. Again, the time and effort involved in trawling through multiple grant funding platforms is nobody’s idea of resources well spent. Mendeley Funding was launched in 2017 to support researchers in their quest by cataloguing funding opportunities from across the globe. It boasts 22,000+ active funding opportunities from over 3,000 organizations, including the European Union, government departments in the United States like the National Institutes of Health, UK Research Councils, as well as foundations and many more.

Additionally, now that this single platform gathers together such a vast quantity of funding opportunities, Mendeley Funding also includes profile information about each funder; now you can discover new funders you may not even realize were out there waiting for you.

Since adopting the same machine learning technology as Mendeley Careers Suggest, researchers can receive email notifications that inform them of the latest funding possibilities that match their research and profile. Mendeley Funding Suggest is set to make your grant application tasks so much easier!

So now, at the end of a hard day in the lab or sitting behind your laptop crunching vital data, you can rest assured knowing that Mendeley Careers and Mendeley Funding are working hard behind the scenes to help you make the next move in your career or secure that vital funding for your research. And perhaps more importantly, because these matches are sent to you as soon as they become available, you don’t need to worry about missing out on opportunities or finding time each day to check for the latest job adverts. All of this is done for you…automatically.

Other related articles:

Elsevier Connect:
http://www.elsevier.com/connect/4-tips-to-get-your-dream-job-in-research
http://www.elsevier.com/connect/how-mendeley-supports-your-research-career-including-finding-one
http://www.elsevier.com/connect/authors-update/the-writings-on-the-wall-mendeley-stats-is-moving-to-your-profile
http://www.elsevier.com/connect/how-to-find-your-dream-research-job-without-swimming-through-a-sea-of-listings

Mendeley Blog:
https://blog.mendeley.com/2018/03/13/wellcome-trust-grant-funding-applying-for-investigator-awards/
https://blog.mendeley.com/2018/01/23/insights-into-the-national-aeronautics-and-space-administration-nasa-grant-research-funding/
https://blog.mendeley.com/2017/11/27/insights-into-funding-indian-department-of-science-and-technology/
https://blog.mendeley.com/2017/10/17/an-introduction-to-applying-for-a-nih-grant/
https://blog.mendeley.com/2017/09/29/tips-for-applying-for-eu-research-funding-erc-grants/

Want to work for a top science employer?

There are many brilliant workplaces in the world of scientific research.

It’s awards season again, and Science Magazine has pulled together its list of top 20 employers.

Mendeley Careers has opportunities from these leading firms. To find their latest roles, click the links below:

Ranking Employer Name Link to Jobs
1 Regeneron Link
4 Merck (Germany) Link
5 Novo Nordisk Link
7 Genentech Link
8 Eli Lilly Link
10 Abbvie Link
11 AstraZeneca Link
12 Syngenta Link
13 Roche Link
14 Novartis Link
15 Abbott Link
16 Boehringer Link
17 Merck Link
18 Monsanto Link
19 Celgene Link

Want more jobs?

New webinar on research careers

August is a good time of year for researchers to contemplate their next career move.

Depending on where you are in the world, the month of August can mean the start of a new semester or the lead up to a whole new academic year. Either way, it’s a good time to begin thinking about your next career move. Whether you’re a PhD or postdoc looking for the next academic opportunity, or an adjunct looking to take a leap of faith into a career in industry, Publishing Campus’ upcoming webinar will offer the guidance you need.

Join academic careers book author Natalie Lundsteen & Mendeley Careers product manager Heather Williams for a 40-minute webinar including presentations and Q&A on 24 August, at 1 pm UTC/3 pm CEST/ 9 am EDT.

Can’t make the live event? Register online to be notified once the webinar recording is available!

Make a Career in Research

24 August, at 1 pm UTC/3 pm CEST/ 9 am EDT

Speakers: Dr. Natalie Lundsteen, Assistant Dean for Career and Professional Development & Assistant Professor of Psychiatry in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Heather Williams, Sr. Product Manager for Mendeley Careers.

Register now

On Mendeley Careers: Brexit & Science – Brexit Means What?

As the United Kingdom departs the European Union, what is the future of British science and research?
As the United Kingdom departs the European Union, what is the future of British science and research?

On Mendeley Careers, we’ve just published an interview with Dr. Anne Forde of Cambridge University; we’re trying to get to the bottom of the complex issue of Brexit and Science in the United Kingdom:

“Brexit means Brexit” according to Prime Minister Theresa May; however, this statement masks a series of complex questions. For example, what will be the future relationship between the United Kingdom and European Union? Will Britain participate in European funding programmes such as Horizon 2020? Will researchers from the European Union still flock to Britain’s globally renowned universities to do their work? How are the universities adjusting to these seismic changes?

Click here to read the full interview.

The Power of Crowdfunding: A Chat with Ethan Perlstein

 

Ethan Perlstein

We love hearing about crowdfunded research projects. As an academic community that aims to bring together researchers from around the world, we get excited about the grass-roots appeal of science funded by enthusiastic peers. This week, we invited scientist and crowdfunding star Ethan Perlstein to sit down with us for a chat. His work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Nature, and Science. Ethan told us all about choosing alternative career paths, his recent fundraising campaigns and the new Perlstein Lab.

1) What’s your academic background?

I graduated from college in 2001 with a degree in sociology but I knew all along that I would go to grad school in biology. I worked summer internships at a small biotech company and at NIH in my last two years of high school and throughout college, so the transition was mostly painless. After getting my PhD in 2006, I took an amazing 5-yr independent postdoc position, where I managed a $1MM budget and a small team working in the area I dubbed evolutionary pharmacology. That position ended in 2012, the year I (and many others) encountered the buzz saw that is the postdocalypse. After two failed academic job search cycles, I exited academia to become an indie scientist and biotech entrepreneur focused on orphan disease drug discovery.

2) How did you learn about crowdfunding as a mechanism for funding your research?

I first heard about crowdfunding in 2010/2011 in the context of Kickstarter’s early successes in the arts. But I didn’t make the connection to the sciences until 2012 when I came across the mostly ecology folks who were participating in the SciFund Challenge (which has just launched its 4th round on the science crowdfunding platform Experiment). So if I had to pinpoint it in time, I’d say the summer of 2012 was when I started to consider crowdfunding a basic research project.

3) What led you to think it’s a viable mechanism to get actual science done?

When I realized that the most successful science crowdfunding campaigns were essentially asking for seed/exploratory funding (along the lines of the well established NIH R03 mechanism), I thought a compelling enough proposal could catch fire.

4) You previously did a crowdfunding campaign on RocketHub. Can you tell us about that experience? How much work was it, what was your strategy for success, what would you do different, and was it worth it overall?

Along with my Crowd4Discovery collaborators Prof David Sulzer and Daniel Korostyshevsky, we raised $25,000 for a basic pharmacology project to study the cellular distribution of amphetamines, including methamphetamine. It was a lot of work to run a social media campaign/offensive for two straight months. But we were rewarded with press coverage that stimulated almost half of our donations. For nuts and bolts advice and tactics, please see my published post-campaign analysis.

5) Now you’re opening your own independent lab. How big is the space, what are you working on, and how many people are in your lab?

Perlstein Lab is located in SF’s newest biotech incubator called QB3@953. Right now it’s just me and a team of advisors. The first team member has signed an offer letter, and I expect to fill out a 4-person team by the end of Spring. Perlstein Lab is initially focusing on a group of 47 related lysosomal storage diseases.

6) Besides funding, what have been the biggest hurdles? Are there some things you’d like to do that you can’t outside of a institution?

The “fundraising vortex” has been the biggest challenge by far, dwarfing all others. I’ve actually found few disadvantages to being outside the Edenic confines of the ivory tower, though paywalls are a constant annoyance. But I spent time and money building a brand for myself early in the process. That has gone a long way in terms of networking, opening doors, and getting key opinion leaders to take me seriously.

7) How are you handling requirements of journals to have ethics board approval for animal or human subjects research?

That’s a great question. Short answer is we haven’t crossed that bridge yet. Perlstein Lab’s platform is built on primordial animal models: yeast, worm, flies and fish. Only fish require regulatory approval. And since we’ll be operating in the preclinical space, we won’t be doing any research on human subjects.

8) There are some funding opportunities not available to you due to your independent status, but are there some available to you that wouldn’t be available to the average lab?

Yes. You don’t see academic labs get funding from angel investor networks. Instead they apply for SBIR/STTR grants to get nascent spinoffs off the ground. (Editor’s note: Ethan is reportedly closing on a lead venture investor now.)

9) What would you say to people who turn up their noses at the amount of money you raised in that campaign relative to the average R01?

I always remind them that the R01 isn’t really an apples to apples comparison. Rather the natural analog as I explained above is the R03, which is a smaller, non-renewable grant that funds exploratory projects. The idea here is that some R03s projects blossom into R01s. Just like in music and the arts, it’s one thing to crowdfund an album or a movie, but another thing to crowdfund a band or a movie studio.

10) What are your plans for the future? Any advice for postdocs who are considering this route?

I’m focused like a laser beam on assembling the Perlstein Lab team and becoming operational by the Spring. But I got here in large part by branding myself on my blog and on Twitter. The journey can start with a single tweet.

Mendeley in Your Neighborhood! Meet Mendeley's Head of Academic Outreach on his US East Coast Tour.

William Gunn, Head of Academic Outreach for Mendeley, and Elizabeth Iorns, cofounder and CEO of Science Exchange, are giving a series of career development seminars at east coast universities over the next few weeks. See below for the dates and locations and check your local event listings for more information.

Please stop by, I’d love to meet you!

Seminar Tour:

Tue 9/18 4PM Yale University

Anylan Center Auditorium, 300 Cedar St. New Haven CT
Wed 9/19 12:30PM Columbia University

701 W. 168th St. Hammer Health Science Room LL203, New York NY
Fri 9/21 4:30PM New York University

Smilow Seminar Room, Langone Medical Center, 550 First Avenue, New York NY
Mon 9/24 12PM Brown University

Brown CareerLab, 167 Angell Street, Providence RI
Wed 9/26 4:30PM Princeton University

Green Hall Room 0-S-6, County Road 526 & William St, Princeton NJ
Fri 9/28 9:30AM Harvard University

60 Oxford Street, Room 330, Cambridge MA
Mon 10/1 1PM UMass Med

Lazare Auditorium, S1-607, Medical School, Worcester MA
Tue 10/2 12PM Boston University

Room L-211/213 BU School of Medicine, Boston MA
Thu 10/4 3:30PM Dana Farber Cancer Institute

Smith building, Rooms #308/309, Boston MA
Fri 10/5 3PM MIT

MIT building 6-120, Cambridge MA