How a PhD prize is supporting chemistry’s bright young stars

By David Evans, Scientific Affairs Director at Reed Elsevier Properties SA

The fuel efficiency of our cars depends on the relative reactivity of the hydrocarbons in the fuel; in 2013 a PhD student published a paper describing a new material that can filter out the molecules that make our cars less efficient. A year later, a different PhD student published work that makes it possible to watch the tiny structures inside cells moving around in real-time, using a microscope.

Rising chemistry stars like these will be tomorrow’s leading scientists, developing solutions to many of the problems we face today. Recognizing their work and supporting their careers is vital, and that’s exactly what the Reaxys PhD Prize is for. The best known and respected of its kind, the Prize has attracted almost 2500 submissions from more than 400 universities in its six-year history.

Every year, 45 finalists are selected out of hundreds of submissions from chemistry PhD candidates and researchers who have recently been awarded their PhD, in a process managed by a review committee of renowned chemists. The finalists represent the world’s best young chemists, and their work is showcased at an annual Symposium.

Submissions are now open for the 2016 PhD Prize, and we’re preparing to see even more outstanding and impactful research this year.

Celebrating success
Imagine you’re just finishing your chemistry PhD and you’re standing at the foot of your career, wondering how you’ll be able to scale the mountain. You’ve done some really cutting-edge work already, but you have even bigger ideas. Now you need people to bounce them around with and a mentor to guide you.

The Reaxys PhD Prize gives exceptional young researchers a leg-up, helping them scale the difficult first part of their career and supporting them with lifetime benefits.

The two PhD students mentioned at the start of this article are previous PhD Prize winners and are now two of almost 300 members of an elite group – the Reaxys Prize Club. Each year the 45 new finalists are welcomed into the Prize Club, giving them the chance to network with some of the world’s best chemists.

The PhD Prize has been running since 2010, hence, Club members now hold a variety of positions in academia and industry, giving incoming members a great opportunity to find mentors and collaborators. Over 50 members are now in their first independent academic positions.

How it works
The 2016 PhD Prize is open to those who are in a chemistry PhD program or have completed their PhD after 1 January 2015, and who have published a peer-reviewed paper during their PhD. They apply online with their peer-reviewed paper, along with a CV (resume) and a letter of recommendation from their PhD supervisor.

Submissions are open until 8 February 2016, after this the review process will start, and once completed the review committee will select the 45 finalists. All 45 finalists automatically become members of the Reaxys Prize Club and a host of other benefits, including unlimited personal access to Reaxys and Reaxys Medicinal Chemistry and discounts on Elsevier Chemistry books and scientific conferences.

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All the finalists are invited to attend the 2016 Reaxys PhD Prize Symposium. Before the symposium, the review committee will publish a shortlist of applicants. At the Symposium, all the finalists will present their research at a poster session, and the shortlisted candidates will give oral presentations. The three winners will be chosen after the oral presentations and will each be awarded a cheque for $2000.

Are you up for the challenge? We are looking forward to seeing the exciting new research being done by today’s rising stars and to welcoming a new wave of members to the Reaxys Prize Club.

To stay updated on the finalists, shortlisted candidates and the winners, visit the PhD Prize website.

Do you know an example of open access research helping the public good? Nominate the team for a $30k ASAP award!

The Public Library of Science, the Wellcome Trust, and Google recently announced the Accelerating Science Award Program. If you know someone who has applied or reused scientific research in an innovative way to advance science, medicine, or technology, you can nominate them for an ASAP award. The goal of ASAP is to reward people for publishing and re-using open access research and also to gather compelling use cases for open access.

This program has major support from publishers, funders, and the tech community and they have put up some serious prize money – $30,000 for each of three winners. The nomination period opened May 1 and runs through June 15. Potential nominees may include individuals or teams of scientists, researchers, educators, entrepreneurs, policy makers, patient advocates, public health workers, students, or anyone else, as long as they have reused open access research in a innovative way. The winners will be announced during Open Access Week in October 2013 in Washington, DC at an event hosted by SPARC and the World Bank. Mendeley is assisting by publicizing the event and gathering nominations, and Creative Commons, along with several other library organizations, publishers, and research organizations are also sponsoring the event.

More information is available at http://asap.plos.org/

Vote for Mendeley as best European startup in the London Web Summit

The London Web Summit is doing something a little different this year. Instead of having a panel of presumed experts judge sites and hand out awards, they’re opening up the process to everyone. Here’s your chance to tell the world that you value companies that are doing something truly useful for the world, as opposed to just another photo sharing or coupon pushing app. We’re now in the top 10 by votes, but we need a little more help. The research community may be small, but its voice is loud. Get yours heard.

 

 

Mendeley is "One to Recognise!"

We’ve got another addition to the trophy case here at Mendeley. Fast Track has given Mendeley a “One to Recognise” award. Fast Track champions the UK’s top-performing private companies and entrepreneurs and The Sunday Times Tech Track 100 league table ranks Britain’s 100 private tech companies with the fastest growth over the past three years. Co-founder Paul Föckler was presented with the award on the 16th of November and it puts us in very good company. Of course, we couldn’t have done this without the support of the million plus researchers that make our service as valuable as it is, so we are very grateful for the support we have received and are committed to making the next three years even better.

GO Team Mendeley!

Nominate Mendeley as Best International Startup at The Crunchies 2009!

It’s the Crunchie Awards season again, and you can help us get on the shortlist for Best International Startup! Just click this badge and submit the nomination on the Crunchies page:

http://crunchies2009.techcrunch.com/embed?ODpNZW5kZWxleQ==

If we get nominated, everybody who voted for us can come to our office and get a kiss from our development team. If you don’t want a kiss, you can also rub their bellies, which brings good luck. Don’t let this chance get away!

A belated photo from our TechCrunch Europas Award

It just occurred to me that, because I went on vacation immediately afterward, we didn’t yet post a photo of our TechCrunch Europas Award! Two weeks ago, we won the prize for “Best Social Innovation (Which Benefits Society)”. Wonderful title, isn’t it?

Mendeley wins TechCrunch Europas Award for Best Social Innovation

A big thank you to everyone who voted for us, to the Europas jury, to event organizer Mike Butcher and Moonfruit (for sponsoring the prize), and of course our team who made this possible!