Support free access to scientific journal articles arising from taxpayer-funded research. #OAMonday

At Mendeley, we believe in the power of the Internet to foster innovation, research, and education. We have worked with colleagues in the library, publishing, research, student, university, epatient, and advocacy communities to develop tools and promote policies that will make research more efficient so that we can address the great challenges of our time.

Requiring the published results of taxpayer-funded research to be posted on the Internet in human and machine readable form would provide access to patients and caregivers, students and their teachers, researchers, entrepreneurs, and other taxpayers who paid for the research. Expanding access would speed the research process and increase the return on our investment in scientific research.

We have a brief, critical window of opportunity to underscore our community’s strong commitment to expanding the NIH Public Access Policy across all U.S. Federal Science Agencies. The administration is currently considering which policy actions are priorities that will they will act on before the 2012 Presidential Election season swings into high gear later this summer. We need to ensure that Public Access is one of those priorities.

The highly successful Public Access Policy of the US National Institutes of Health proves that opening access can be done without disrupting the research process. Here’s an opportunity to get guaranteed legislative action on open access policies for all federal agencies that fund scientific research. Access is a global issue, so you don’t have to be a US resident to sign, you just need an email address:

Sign the petition here and please share with your colleagues.

On sharing research and the value of peer-review: Mendeley's response to #SOPA and the Research Works Act.

UPDATE: The RFIs have now been posted and there’s a petition opposing the RWA on whitehouse.gov.

The US White House Office of Science and Technology Policy recently issued a Request for Information on their existing policy requiring some federally-funded work to be submitted to Pubmed Central, where it’s freely accessible to the public. We were pleased to have the opportunity to respond and a summary of our response is below. Before getting into that, however, I’d like to take a little detour and talk a little about our mission and how that relates to the scholarly endeavor. Our mission at Mendeley is to help researchers organize research, collaborate easily with colleagues, and discover new research. Read More »

Self-archiving with Mendeley

Keeping with the Open Access week spirit, we’re taking this opportunity to show you how to publicly share your own research on Mendeley. Making it openly available for others to easily access means they are more likely to cite you in their own publications, and also allows your colleagues to build upon your work faster.

When you sign up for a Mendeley user account, a researcher profile is created for you. On this page, along with your name, academic status, and short bio, you will also see a section titled “Publications”. This section is where you can display work you’ve published or perhaps even work that’s not yet published.

So how do you add your publications to that list? Just drop your papers into the My Publications folder in Mendeley Desktop. Let me show you how, step by step.Read More »

New Web Release – Search Edition. Group search, better OA search and more!

This week’s update to Mendeley Web has a some search enhancements that should make it a little easier to find things on Mendeley Web. The main addition is search for groups. Now that we have over 50,000 groups created by people sharing research on a topic with their colleagues, publishing curated lists, or just having a bit of fun, finding groups by invitation or through your contacts’ profiles isn’t quite enough.Read More »

Mendeley is now more social: featuring collaborative groups, in-app tutorial, & updated citation styles.

This week we have released a new version of Mendeley with some major updates. The major new feature in Mendeley 0.9.8.1 is public collaborative groups.

What are groups?

Groups are a simple way for you to collaborate with your colleagues to create a shared collection of documents. Groups allow members to put together a list of papers and share notes. There are three types of groups:
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Dear researcher, which side of history will you be on?

Recently I was sitting at café Tryst in Washington D.C. along with Mendeley’s co-founders and a coffee house full of hipsters, Georgetown students, tourists, and a few politicos. In retrospect, perhaps this was the only setting possible to be discussing the future of research and our small part in it. We were surrounded by the common citizens who depend on the outputs of science, but had little to no power in changing its course for their benefit. More pointedly, they had no clue that science is being held back by the very people who are supposed to be advancing it.

We came to the conclusion that technology is finally at a point that if we don’t use it now, then we are holding back the progress of science. And what exactly are we to use technology on? Open science/data/access.

By our own hands

To understand how we (“we” meaning the research community) got here, we have to first briefly remember how the dissemination of science came to be the way it is. Read More »

Science Online London 2010 call for sponsors

Are you working for a company or institution in the field of science, or do you want to reach the thought leaders in science online? We are looking for sponsorship partners for our Science Online London 2010 conference on 3-4 September (Fri/Sat) at the British Library in St Pancras, London. Last year, our sponsors included institutions and companies like the Royal Institution of Great Britain, CrossRef, NESTA, AAAS/Science, and BioData.

As a sponsor, you will gain exposure to key scientific bloggers, communicators and thought leaders. Given the nature of the audience, we anticipate plenty of media coverage and ‘buzz’ through social media such as Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, FriendFeed and blogs. The conference is a golden opportunity to demonstrate that your company is a supporter of such tools for scientific communication, and a chance to promote your brands, products and services to an audience of passionate communicators.

If you would like to participate as a sponsor of Science Online London 2010 please contact Lou Woodley (l.woodley@nature.com).

Co-hosted by:

Fringe Frivolous and Science Online London 2009 Pictures!

What a weekend that was! We hosted the Fringe Frivolous Blogging Unconference (organized by Jenny Rohn) on our roof terrace on Friday night, and co-organized Science Online London 2009 (with Nature Network) at the Royal Institution on Saturday. Martin Fenner has already collected a few thoughts and blog posts on the conference.

Together with Richard P. Grant/F1000 and Virginia Barbour/PloS, I also gave a talk on “Real-Time Metrics in Science” – it went rather well until, five minutes into the discussion, an iPhone alarm started to ring and its owner didn’t stop it for a full 5 minutes. All told however, it was great fun – and we’ve vowed to return with Science Online London 2010 next year!

Without further ado, here are my 30 favourite pictures of the merry proceedings. Curiously, both the FringeFrivolous and the Solo09 set end with Gulliver, the BioMedCentral Turtle.

Fringe Frivolous Blogging Unconference @ Mendeley

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