Mendeley contributes 2000 citation styles to the open citation style repository at citationstyles.org

Scholars looking to publish in one of the approximately 30,000 peer reviewed scholarly journals (per Ulrich’s) have a big problem on their hands. They have to prepare the text of their manuscript according to the style specified by the journal, process the images as specified by the journal, prepare the necessary disclosures, deposit datasets into the appropriate repositories, and do a host of other activities according to their field, and then every citation must be written in a specific format that is (often trivially) different for every one of the approximately 2000 publishers of peer-reviewed scholarly content. As if doing the research isn’t hard enough!

Slowly, ever so slowly, technology is changing this practice.Read More »

Is the time right for a preprint server for life science?

On the other hand, physicists like to say physics is to math as sex is to masturbation.Academics in physics, economics, or math often think that life scientists (like myself) are weird because life science doesn’t have a preprint server. Life science is a fast-paced discipline, but there’s no place where the latest research can be found, discussed, and where the primacy of results can be established. There’s a lot of value in life science research (the reproducible subset, that is) but instead of staking your claim to a finding shortly after you get the data, many researchers feel like they have to write a polished paper, submit it to a prestigious journal, and wait nerve-wracking months to years for the process of review, rejection, resubmission to finally make their results available to a subset of others in their field.As submission-to-publication times grow, fears of someone else getting there first grow and there are often accusations of “anonymous” reviewers asking for more experiments, just to delay the publication of a paper from a competing lab. What can be done about this? Read More »

On the future of our Open API: feature updates and eating our own dog food

There have been a few guiding principles that have directed the progress and business strategy of Mendeley from the very beginning, and chief among these is our mission to make research more collaborative and open. We want to build a bridge to a more modern way of using the web for scholarly communication.

To that end, we’ve been hard at work lately improving our Open API, as it’s a critical part of our strategy. We currently serve more than 100 million API calls per month to about 260 third-party apps. In addition, our API powers the analytics dashboard of the Mendeley Institutional Edition, and powers the Institutional Repository sync via Symplectics Elements. We hope to see the numbers of client applications grow, and to that end, we’ve made some fundamental changes to the API. Our overall goal is to further open up our data and extend third-party developers’ capabilities, so here’s a summary of recent and upcoming changes:Read More »

Make your citations look exactly how they should with Mendeley's visual citation style editor




Image via kalyan02

We’re very happy to announce the release of the first true “what-you-see-is-what-you-get” citation style editor for open source CSL citation styles – produced in collaboration with Columbia University Libraries and supported by a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Most academic journals insist that papers submitted to them conform to the journal’s own idiosyncratic style of citing research. This has led to a proliferation of thousands of different citation styles, often with only minuscule differences in things like the placement of commas or use of italics. To support their users in this arduous task, modern reference management tools like ours ship with 2789 different citation styles for use when formatting a bibliography in Word or Open Office.

It turns out that 2789 was still not enough!Read More »

Interview with eLife, a new tech-forward #openaccess journal

I recently caught up with the very busy eLife team to ask them a few questions, along the same lines as the PeerJ interview I did earlier this year. While there are many new open access journals launching every year, we think this one is special because they’re breaking the traditional mold in some significant ways: bringing transparency to reviews, implementing full open access as opposed to just free-to-read access, and redesigning the publication processes to implement modern technology. They’re also intending to be highly selective, somewhat breaking the newly popular megajournal mold from which PLOS ONE was cast and which most major traditional publishers have hastened to copy.Read More »

Liveblogging Open Science Summit

I’m here at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View for Open Science Summit. This is my third year at the conference and it’s so great to see so many familiar faces. I’ll be talking about the developments in open access over the past few years and updating this page as the day progresses.

9:00 – The day starts off with Tyler Neylon recounting the story of the Cost of Knowledge petition. He’s drawing from a historical view to project into the future of open access.Read More »

Mendeley in Your Neighborhood! Meet Mendeley's Head of Academic Outreach on his US East Coast Tour.

William Gunn, Head of Academic Outreach for Mendeley, and Elizabeth Iorns, cofounder and CEO of Science Exchange, are giving a series of career development seminars at east coast universities over the next few weeks. See below for the dates and locations and check your local event listings for more information.

Please stop by, I’d love to meet you!

Seminar Tour:

Tue 9/18 4PM Yale University

Anylan Center Auditorium, 300 Cedar St. New Haven CT
Wed 9/19 12:30PM Columbia University

701 W. 168th St. Hammer Health Science Room LL203, New York NY
Fri 9/21 4:30PM New York University

Smilow Seminar Room, Langone Medical Center, 550 First Avenue, New York NY
Mon 9/24 12PM Brown University

Brown CareerLab, 167 Angell Street, Providence RI
Wed 9/26 4:30PM Princeton University

Green Hall Room 0-S-6, County Road 526 & William St, Princeton NJ
Fri 9/28 9:30AM Harvard University

60 Oxford Street, Room 330, Cambridge MA
Mon 10/1 1PM UMass Med

Lazare Auditorium, S1-607, Medical School, Worcester MA
Tue 10/2 12PM Boston University

Room L-211/213 BU School of Medicine, Boston MA
Thu 10/4 3:30PM Dana Farber Cancer Institute

Smith building, Rooms #308/309, Boston MA
Fri 10/5 3PM MIT

MIT building 6-120, Cambridge MA

Making Openness Work: An interview with Barry Bunin of Collaborative Drug Discovery

I recently had the chance to sit down with Barry Bunin to talk about his new drug discovery platform, Collaborative Drug Discovery. As you may guess from the title, he’s taking a novel approach to drug discovery. Modern drug discovery faces huge challenges due to the economic inefficiency of the process where hundreds of millions of dollars must be spent to discover one new drug. The current model also makes it difficult to capitalize on all the interesting but not immediately drug-relevant data that’s generated in the process. CDD’s approach promotes collaboration as opposed to the traditional approach where different teams at different companies repeat much of the same work and suggests that companies will actually share information that leads to a mutual benefit, provided there’s a easy and secure way to do so. I’m delighted to share this interview with you of yet another company showing how openness and collaboration works for business.Read More »

Here's one solution for the reproducibility crisis in scientific research.

We talk a lot about open access here, but one thing we haven’t delved into as much as we could is the quality of the research. We have plenty of data on the attention the world’s academics are paying to research outputs (watch this space for more on this) but we haven’t done as much to address the quality aspect as we have done to address the quantity of freely available research via open access. Today, that’s all going to change.Read More »

Another science startup that's changing how research is done. An interview with Elizabeth Iorns of Science Exchange.

I recently had the chance to sit down with Elizabeth Iorns of Science Exchange to talk about her company and her vision for accelerating research and development and making research more efficient and reproducible. I really wish Science Exchange had been around when I was finishing my PhD. It would have saved me tons of time and saved the lab money, too.

Special note:
Elizabeth and I are offering a free seminar series on making the transition from academia to industry. If you’re interested in having us speak at your institution, please contact elizabeth.iorns @ scienceexchange.com.Read More »