Mendeley Bootcamp for German-speaking researchers

MENDELEY BOOTCAMP 2016

All scientists have one thing in common: The passion for our research. But growing requirements require fast and efficient cooperation, access to literature from anywhere, timely synchronization of laboratory results and to be in contact with other researchers worldwide. That sounds like a challenge, right? No more! With Mendeley you can easily optimize your everyday work and devote your time what actually really matters: your research.

Developed by scientists for scientists, Mendeley connects you worldwide with 6+ million users.

Join Mendeley Bootcamp 2016 for German speaking. An exclusive webinar series aimed to German speaking researchers focused on how Mendeley can help you manage your references, understand the impact of your research and showcase your work.

The webinar series will cover the use of Mendeley as:

* A powerful Reference Management Tool to Store, read, annotate and cite literature both individually and collaboratively anywhere on any device.

* A Scholarly Collaboration Network with a global community of 6+ mill researchers across all scientific disciplines to connect, collaborate and showcase their work.

* A personal analytics dashboard enabling researchers to evaluate the performance and societal impact of their publications via a concise and comprehensive collection of key performance metrics.

* A discovery tool with personalised Recommenders, Alerts, and media updates, enabling researchers to stay up to date in their fields.

* A data repository to securely store datasets online so they can be cited and shared.

BOOTCAMP SCHEDULE

Screen Shot 2016-10-07 at 12.39.11.png

Register now!
https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/RR7VP8G

Ask science anything with #MendeleyWall @ New Scientist Live 22-25th September

If I could ask science anything…

Mendeley is inviting attendees of New Scientist Live to ask our community, and the wider scientific world, all their deep burning questions about science! Mendeley’s mission is to help researchers showcase their work to the world and this is a great opportunity to connect researchers and experts with the general public.

We’ll be collecting people’s questions through the medium of a message wall and Tweeting questions to our 15,000 followers using #MendeleyWall during the whole New Scientist Live event (22th – 25th September).

We’re at stand number 1224 near the Brains & Body demonstration area, so if you are attending come and say hi!

Besides the Great Mendeley Wall, our stand will feature hands-on science and technology activities. All the activities follow our Mendeley Hack Day idea in that they are reproducible and accessible to DIY.

Learn how to build a smartphone microscope, see and feel microscopic objects made tangible by our 3D printer, try some coding projects, and learn more about Citizen Science and how you can get involved with research!

NS-NS_Live_header_What_If_v1

We invite you, to use us as conduit for connecting with the New Scientist Live audience (an expected 25,000 attendees) by helping answer #MendeleyWall questions via Twitter, and hopefully inspiring people to walk away with a newly-ignited passion for science. We’ll be aligning topics with the New Scientist Live core themes, so expect questions on Earth, Cosmos, Technology, and Brain & Body.

To find out more about the #MendeleyWall and how you can get involved please feel free to reach out to jonathan.beyer@mendeley.com to discuss, please keep an eye on #MendeleyWall during the show and jump in if you see a question that you can answer!

Or if you have any questions you’d like answered comment down below.

There are still discount tickets available for the event here.

Follow us on social media to keep up to date
https://twitter.com/mendeley_com
https://www.facebook.com/mendeley

Save up to £9 on New Scientist Live tickets!

New Scientist Live – the UK’s biggest festival of ideas and inspiration, launches this September and Mendeley will be joining in the fun with some special activities on the show floor!!!

New Scientist Live is 22 – 25 September 2016, at ExCeL London.

The inaugural New Scientist Live event, courtesy of the team behind the world’s most popular science weekly, is a four-day festival of ideas and discovery taking place at ExCeL London.

Rooted in the biggest, best and most provocative science that touches all areas of human life, the show will feature over 100 exhibitors, 120 speakers (inc. Tim Peake & Dara O Briain), 5 theatres and 4 immersive zones covering Brain & Body, Technology, Earth and The Cosmos to showcase how science, technology and engineering drive our economy, shape our culture and improve our lives.

You’ll be able to find us at stand 1224 in the Brain & Body zone, full details of what Mendeley’s activities on the day will be announced soon!

For further information and the timetable of the talks taking place visit www.newscientistlive.com.

Book your place now and save

As a friend of Mendeley, you can get an exclusive discounted rate on tickets*

Book £40 VIP tickets (giving you guaranteed access to the Main Stage talks) on Thursday or Friday of the event – a saving of £5 per ticket

Or, book standard admission tickets on Thursday or Friday at the show for just £20 – saving £9 per ticket on the door rate

Tickets for Saturday or Sunday at the show are just £22.50 – saving £6.50 per ticket on the door rate

To book, quote MEND16 on the booking page at www.newscientistlive.com or call 0844 581 1295

Children 12 and under go free when accompanied by an adult

*transaction fee applies, must be booked by midnight 21/9/16

Beginners guide to writing a manuscript in LaTeX

Interactive course available now.

LaTeX is a document preparation system for the communication and publication of scientific documents that include complex math expressions or non-Latin scripts, such as Arabic, Sanskrit and Chinese. It is widely used in many fields in academia, including mathematics, physics, computer science, statistics, economics and political science. In LaTeX the writer uses plain text and uses mark-up tagging conventions to define the general structure of a document (such as article, book, and letter), to stylise text throughout a document (such as bold and italic), and to add citations and cross-references.

After having followed this interactive course you will be able to work with LaTeX for your manuscripts. Topics addressed are:

* Downloading the software;

* Using the software for scientific manuscripts;

* Adding equations, figures and tables;

* Output of data and documents;

* Rules, common mistakes and troubleshooting.

Understanding of all topics is checked during the course.

Webinar Thursday 23 June – Creating a good research data management plan

Thursday 23 June, 2016 – 15.00 CET, 14.00 BST, 09.00 EDT
Duration: 45 min

Increasingly, funders require researchers to submit a data management plan – a document describing how data will be acquired, treated and preserved during and after a research project – when they apply for a grant.

Beyond funding, good research data management helps researchers save time and efforts whilst running experiments. It is also of value to the wider scientific community, as well-organised data can be further analysed by other researchers.

This online lecture, produced in collaboration with the Dutch TechCentre for Life Sciences will address the following topics:

What is a data management plan?
When do you need a data management plan?
Why is research data management important?
What are the FAIR principles?
Attending this lecture will equip you with the knowledge to start your own research data management plan and get the most out of your data. The presentation will be followed by a Questions & Answers session.

Sign up here!

Why do we need Energy Storage in Buildings?

aKdV8MM-Pint Of Science 2016 begins tonight (23/05)! To get you excited Andreas Georgakarakos (@andrewGRK) kindly previewed his forthcoming talk “Why do we need Energy Storage in Buildings?” at The Doctor’s Orders, Sheffield on the 24/05. Check out our other preview pieces too!

Andreas is a Mechanical & Environmental Engineer, PhD Researcher at Energy Storage CDT, University of Sheffield.

The Energy Trilemma (security of supply, low-carbon production and affordability) is driving a trend toward electrification of the UK energy market. The increasing proportion of Renewable Energy Sources (RES) will result in stochastic supply whilst electrification of demand requires a more certain supply. Hence supply is less assured but growth of demand requires a greater level of assurance. The role of the Smart Grid is therefore to balance these competing requirements. Systems theory suggests that by aligning all sub-systems to common goals the overall system gains.

Therefore, Smart Grids need to interact with edge systems such as buildings. Non-domestic buildings have great potential to be utilised by the Smart Grid in managing energy demand. The functional characteristics of a building designed to work as a sub-system within a wider smart grid to achieve the overall goal of addressing the energy trilemma are:

  • The extent that the building can change its energy demand following a request;
  • How the extent varies as a function of the notification period;
  • How this varies with the external climate and internal loads.

There are expected to be financial incentives for buildings to respond to Smart Grid events over different time periods. This will necessitate the design of buildings that are financially optimised to work cooperatively within a Smart Grid ecosystem. Buildings will benefit from the ability to modify their energy use in response to Smart Grid events. It is anticipated that a Smart Grid Optimised Building (SGOB) will have particular characteristics relating to its energy storage (electrical and thermal) differs significantly from low carbon or low energy buildings.

RESThe definitions of the capability of buildings to alter their demand in line with the wider Smart Grid goals would allow Buildings to enter the energy market as a storage vector. Furthermore, the approach to quantifying SGOB in light of dynamic pricing should increase the clarity surrounding the role of energy storage technologies through development of the understanding of their economic value in relation to the temporal aspect of energy storage to the function and goals of Smart Grids.

This project will explore the hypothesis that the storage characteristics of buildings will play a crucial role in ensuring that they function as an effective sub-system a Smart Grid environment. It will seek to define at what scale, using what technology and distributed in what manner should storage be located in buildings and how is this influenced by the evolutionary state of the wider smart grid.

Currently, there are no universally accepted definitions for the different classifications of buildings. For example, while there is an increasing literature concerning smart buildings, there is no justified definition of what a smart building. Most approaches support that smart buildings integrate intelligence, enterprise, control and materials & construction as an entire building system, with adaptability, not reactivity, in order to meet the drivers for building progression: energy and efficiency, longevity and comfort”. Similarly, a proper definition for SGOBs has yet to be established.

Tickets for Pint Of Science talks are selling fast, so get over to through their official website to grab some.

Mendeley is extremely excited to be partnering with Pint of Science for the second year running! This year, we are sponsoring “Atoms to Galaxies” events across the UK, and Mendeley API & Mendeley Data are co-sponsoring “Tech Me Out” events. Last year was a massive success, and we feel passionate about the Pint of Science mission to bring research to the public, and give a chance for academics to present their work. We hope to help grow the event so more people can hear about the vast and amazing research happening in our galaxy — and beyond.

Pint of Spiders… With Robots

One week away until we lift our glasses to science!

vcXeot7HTo continue our series of Pint Of Science 2016 previews we spoke to Michelle Reeve (@michelleareeve) about her forthcoming talk “Pint of Spiders… with robots” at The Rugby Tavern, London on the 23/05. Although it might initially sound like the stuff of nightmares it is in fact extremely important research and we cannot wait to hear the whole talk next week!

Michelle was born and bred on the east coast of Norfolk, UK, and now lives in London after moving there to study for her undergraduate degree: BSc BioVeterinary Sciences at the Royal Veterinary College.

When we think of robots, often the first image to spring to mind is that of a humanoid. Perhaps made of metal, slightly clunky but able to move around more or less like a human. The first robots were indeed like this, and this stereotype has been emphasised by numerous film and literature depictions of robots both before and since. As technology has advanced, robots have become sleeker, more efficient, more specialist, and much more varied.

One of the ways in which we have improved legged robots is by turning to nature. Animals can move elegantly and efficiently over obstacles and difficult terrain with ease. They have benefitted from millions of years of evolution, so that today, they are brilliantly well-adapted to moving around within their environments. Increasingly, research teams comprised of roboticists, engineers and biologists come together, with the dual goal of learning how a particular animal or group of animals move, and using this knowledge to create an efficient, ‘bioinspired’ robot.

Despite this, our legged robots are still far from perfect. They are still are often unsteady, clumsy and energy-hungry. If they are damaged, a human needs to fix them. Depending on the purpose of the robot, this can be okay; if a research robot gets broken and needs a quick fix, nobody minds But if the robot is designed to enter dangerous places, you really don’t want to be sending an engineer in with it.

WolfSpiderLego_MARAnd this is where my research comes in. I’m the biologist in this interdisciplinary team, and I work on spider movement. Why spiders? Well, they can do exactly what we’d like our robots to do: when they damage themselves, they can just carry on. Spiders can actually self-amputate their legs, through a natural defence process known as autotomy. This can happen as a result of fighting during mating, being attacked by a predator, or even getting stuck in a problematic moult. Juveniles can often grow the leg back during their next moult cycle, but adults just have to live with it. And they cope remarkably well!

My work on the biomechanics of spider locomotion hopes to tease out some of the secrets of exactly how they move with missing legs. I’m looking at wolf spiders, a native UK species which run fast overground, just as we’d like our robots to be able to do. By filming them with a high speed camera, I study their movement over flat surfaces and rough terrain. In particular, I look at how the individual legs pair up or group together – and how this changes when a leg is lost. This data can suggest how the spider gait is controlled, and from this we can design a bioinspired control system for a new or existing legged robot.

This type of adaptive, bioinspired control system could have real benefit to robotics, and to people. Robots typically house a suite of sensors, and these could report if a leg were to become damaged, or broken off completely. This would cause the control system to change to the ‘optimal’ gait for a missing leg, as inspired by the spider. Of course, this is a very simplified description of how it would work, but the positive impact remains. Robots like this could enter dangerous territory, coping with damage without needing humans around to fix it. They could be mounted with cameras to search for survivors alongside the emergency services, or used in the armed forces to sweep enemy territory for threats before in sending soldiers. So, by studying the movements of the humble spider, we can begin to develop bioinspired legged robots could save human lives.

Tickets for Pint Of Science talks are selling fast, so get over to through their official website to grab some.

Mendeley is extremely excited to be partnering with Pint of Science for the second year running! This year, we are sponsoring “Atoms to Galaxies” events across the UK, and Mendeley API & Mendeley Data are co-sponsoring “Tech Me Out” events. Last year was a massive success, and we feel passionate about the Pint of Science mission to bring research to the public, and give a chance for academics to present their work. We hope to help grow the event so more people can hear about the vast and amazing research happening in our galaxy — and beyond.