Search thousands of science and technology jobs at Mendeley Careers – launching in October

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Finding the right job is important to build your expertise, further your research and get the exposure you need to develop your career. And job listings are not always about finding your next position, but keeping up-to-date in your field, or across disciplines.

Mendeley is launching a new Careers service, which will select thousands of relevant science and technology job postings from the leading job boards, academic institutions, company employers, and recruitment agencies across the world.

You will be able to search and apply for your next position on Mendeley. Sign up for email alerts tailored to your search criteria, and upload your resume to let recruiters and jobs come to you.

Mendeley Careers will also offer guides and resources to help you with your job search and to develop your career further.

Watch for Mendeley Careers launching in October.

We are interested to learn from you about your interest in seeking job and funding opportunities via the Mendeley network. So whether you’re actively seeking or just keeping your options open, check out these opportunities, and let us know what you think in the comments below!

Congratulations to our Advisor of the Month, Duncan Casey!

Congratulations and thank you to Duncan Casey! Duncan is one of the Mendeley Advisors who showcased his research work through a hands-on demonstration at Mendeley’s booth at New Scientist Live! Duncan and his colleagues from Imperial College brought along their laser tractor beam and challenged attendees to race a polystyrene ball around a track! Yes, we said tractor beam.

While at New Scientist Live, Duncan also helped answer questions about science, which we posted on Twitter under the hashtag #MendeleyWall, and appeared on BBC Radio 5 answering callers’ questions live at New Scientist Live!

Learn more about Duncan and why he thinks Mendeley is great even for technophobes:

How did you get into your field and what is your research story?
Mine’s been less a career path and more a random walk. I started out my scientific career expecting to be a drug development chemist but once I actually got to try it, I found I didn’t like it much. From there, I started investigating drug transport around the body, ended up developing techniques and tools to analyse cell membranes and almost accidentally picked up some experience in laser optics along the way. My research now revolves around mixing the three skill-sets together – in using lasers and surface chemistry to do biology experiments on a very small scale.
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Where do you do your research/work the best? What kind of environment suits you?
Creative anarchy! When everything is working well, there’s a lot of excited shouting going on as a room full of smart people bounce ideas off each other. Some ideas are ridiculous, some are inspired, and a few are both.

How long have you been on Mendeley and what were you using prior to Mendeley and how does Mendeley influence your research?
I’ve been using Mendeley since about 2008, I think – I was asked to review it for a newspaper article, and found it a huge improvement on any of the reference management platforms I’d encountered up until that point. At the time it didn’t quite do what I needed, but clearly had a lot of potential, so I got involved as an advisor and helped a little with the development and testing of Mendeley Groups.

My research involves lots of people with widely differing areas of expertise spread across several countries, and everyone’s learning at least one new science. Being able to keep a body of both our own work and a core package of reference texts in one place has helped hugely when bringing new members up to speed, while being able to discuss and debate new papers or ideas in a single platform has been a lot of help.

Why did you decide to become an Advisor and how are you involved with the program?
When I first started using Mendeley it was only really suitable for small groups of researchers – it was more a reference manager than an out-and-out collaboration tool. At the time, I was working on my Ph.D. at Imperial’s Institute of Chemical Biology, and we needed something with a bit more breadth that could handle 30-40 researchers attacking a problem at the same time. That fed into what became Mendeley Groups, and my team became the pilot project for Imperial College’s use of the system as it became an increasingly integral part of the way we worked. I now use the same system to work with my team of engineering students at LJMU, as I try to turn them into physicists and instrument designers.

What academic/researcher/librarian would you like to work with or meet, dead or alive?
Richard Feynman. He was a seriously, seriously smart man with a pointy sense of humour, and a side-line playing bongo drums in strip clubs.

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Attendee at New Scientist Live attempting to steer a particle around a laser beam track created by Casey

What book are you reading at the moment and why?
Depressingly, I’m trying to teach myself a couple of programming languages as I’m getting tired of being shown up by my students – that’s taking up a fair bit of my time. Outside of that, though, I’m slowly working my way through Jody Taylor’s novels about time-travelling historians. You wouldn’t necessarily accuse them of being high literature, but the enthusiastic chaos and cobbled-together hardware she describes makes me think she’s spent some time in academic R&D.

What is the best part about working in research?
I work in an expensive, dangerous toy shop making lasers do things they aren’t supposed to. What’s not to like? What’s really good fun is when you see something dreamt up on the back of a beer mat turning into a real experiment, instrument or product. The very best ones are those that are glaringly obvious to everyone exactly one second after you’ve made the first prototype – those are the ideas you know are going to be successful.

And the worst/most challenging part about working in research?
It’s about 99% frustration to 1 part exultation. If you aren’t comfortable with (or at least able to tolerate) really great-sounding ideas failing because of either accident, oversight or just some weird interaction with something that no-one had seen before, it’s not a game for you. When it’s good, though, it’s the best job in the world.

What is the one thing you want people to know about Mendeley?
Just about every function it has is exactly where you’d expect to find it – someone clearly spent a lot of time and effort making the thing intuitive to use, and even my old technophobe supervisors got to grips with it pretty quickly.

Difficult decisions lay ahead if our planet is to avoid environmental catastrophe

Mendeley Brainstorm: Climate Change – Too Little, Too Late?

Difficult decisions lay ahead if our planet is to avoid environmental catastrophe
Difficult decisions lay ahead if our planet is to avoid environmental catastrophe

2016 is set to be the hottest year on record. Rising sea levels have already forced out entire communities; melting permafrost may have unleashed an anthrax epidemic in Russia.  In response, the United States and China have promised to curb their carbon emissions.  However, is this a case of too little, too late? We are looking for the most well thought out answer to this question in up to 150 words: use the comment feature below the blog and please feel free to promote your research!  The winner will receive an Amazon gift certificate worth £50 and a bag full of Mendeley items; competition closes October 19.

2016: The Hottest Year on Record?

According to NASA and the United Nations, 2016 promises to be the hottest year on record.  This past June was, according to the UN, the “14th month for record heat” on land and sea.  This change represents a 1.3 degrees Celsius increase on the temperatures of the pre-industrial era.

The consequences of climate change have already been severe.  In August, the coastal village of Shishmaref, Alaska voted to relocate itself due to rising sea levels.  Elevated temperatures have been linked to melting of the permafrost in Russia, which may have sparked an outbreak of anthrax.  More extreme weather events and their follow on consequences have been widely predicted.

The World Responds

At the recent G20 summit, the two nations which emit the most carbon, China and the United States, agreed to make significant reductions.  In August, the Netherlands discussed banning petrol and diesel fueled cars. President Obama also promised $40 million to island nations in order to help them cope with the effects of climate change.

Too Little, Too Late?

The nations of the world are finally grappling with the reality of climate change, but are these efforts too little, too late?  Tell us!

Try Mendeley Data!

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Climatologists already use Mendeley Data to store their findings; it’s handy, easy to use and offers a broad variety of licensing schema so that your data can be distributed, embargoed and utilised in any way you choose.  It also interlocks with the wider Mendeley ecosystem for added convenience.  Visit http://data.mendeley.com

About Mendeley Brainstorms

Our Brainstorms are challenges so we can engage with you, our users, on the hottest topics in the world of research.  We look for the most in-depth and well thought through responses; the best response as judged by the Mendeley team will earn a prize.

References

Bogado, A. (2016) Alaska native village votes to relocate in the face of rising sea levels. Climate Desk. Available at: http://climatedesk.org/2016/08/alaska-native-village-votes-to-relocate-in-the-face-of-rising-sea-levels/ (Accessed: 6 September 2016).

Luhn, A. (2016) Did climate change cause Russia’s deadly anthrax outbreak? Climate Desk. Available at: http://climatedesk.org/2016/08/did-climate-change-cause-russias-deadly-anthrax-outbreak/ (Accessed: 6 September 2016).

Parkinson, J. (2016) Obama, Chinese president ratify landmark climate deal ‘to save our planet’. ABC News. Available at: http://abcnews.go.com/International/obama-chinese-president-xi-ratify-climate-change-agreement/story?id=41842303 (Accessed: 6 September 2016).

The Guardian. (2016). 2016 set to be world’s hottest year on record, says UN. [online] Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jul/21/2016-worlds-hottest-year-on-record-un-wmo [Accessed 6 Sep. 2016].

Sheppard, K. (2016) Obama to announce new climate change help for island nations. Huffington Post. Available at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/obama-climate-change_us_57c855dee4b0e60d31dda9bd (Accessed: 6 September 2016).

Staufenberg, J. (2016) Climate change: Netherlands on brink of banning sale of petrol-fuelled cars. The Independent. Available at: http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change/netherlands-petrol-car-ban-law-bill-to-be-passed-reduce-climate-change-emissions-a7197136.html (Accessed: 6 September 2016).

Augmented Reality helps us see the world and each other in new ways.

Mendeley Brainstorm – Augmented Reality – We Have a Winner!

Augmented Reality helps us see the world and each other in new ways.
Augmented Reality helps us see the world and each other in new ways.

Many thanks to all those who entered the Mendeley Brainstorm related to Augmented Reality; picking a winner given all the well thought out answers was not a straightforward matter, however in the end, we selected Carol from the University of Manitoba’s response:

I think a really obvious app for AR would be an emotion recognition app. There are already emotion recognition apps that allow people to look at photos and select which emotion the person is expressing and there is software that analyzes the emotion in video content. Augmented reality would be the next logical step. For those individuals with Social Anxiety, Autism Spectrum Disorders or certain types of Traumatic Brain injury and others who have a difficult time recognizing social cues and/or emotions. They could simply check a “message” and learn if the person is stressed/calm/indifferent. It wouldn’t hurt for single people doing the dating thing either!

We asked her what inspired her. She responded:

…I know several people with difficulty recognizing emotions/social cues for a variety of reasons and it seemed to me to be a natural fit for an augmented reality app. Could you imagine the sheer processing power that it would require to do real-time emotional recognition?

That sounds like a challenge. Carol also told us:

By the way love the Mendeley product and am having a blast teaching it to my library clients at the University of Manitoba. It makes me look like a guru. 😉 Thanks for making it easy.

You’re welcome, Carol!

Those who didn’t win this time are encouraged to respond to the latest Mendeley Brainstorm, regarding Assistive Technology. Thanks again to all our participants.

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Ask science anything with #MendeleyWall @ New Scientist Live 22-25th September

If I could ask science anything…

Mendeley is inviting attendees of New Scientist Live to ask our community, and the wider scientific world, all their deep burning questions about science! Mendeley’s mission is to help researchers showcase their work to the world and this is a great opportunity to connect researchers and experts with the general public.

We’ll be collecting people’s questions through the medium of a message wall and Tweeting questions to our 15,000 followers using #MendeleyWall during the whole New Scientist Live event (22th – 25th September).

We’re at stand number 1224 near the Brains & Body demonstration area, so if you are attending come and say hi!

Besides the Great Mendeley Wall, our stand will feature hands-on science and technology activities. All the activities follow our Mendeley Hack Day idea in that they are reproducible and accessible to DIY.

Learn how to build a smartphone microscope, see and feel microscopic objects made tangible by our 3D printer, try some coding projects, and learn more about Citizen Science and how you can get involved with research!

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We invite you, to use us as conduit for connecting with the New Scientist Live audience (an expected 25,000 attendees) by helping answer #MendeleyWall questions via Twitter, and hopefully inspiring people to walk away with a newly-ignited passion for science. We’ll be aligning topics with the New Scientist Live core themes, so expect questions on Earth, Cosmos, Technology, and Brain & Body.

To find out more about the #MendeleyWall and how you can get involved please feel free to reach out to jonathan.beyer@mendeley.com to discuss, please keep an eye on #MendeleyWall during the show and jump in if you see a question that you can answer!

Or if you have any questions you’d like answered comment down below.

There are still discount tickets available for the event here.

Follow us on social media to keep up to date
https://twitter.com/mendeley_com
https://www.facebook.com/mendeley

Thanks to assistive technologies, impaired no longer means disabled.

Mendeley Brainstorm: Assistive Technology – Powerful and Pervasive

Thanks to assistive technologies, impaired no longer means disabled.
Thanks to assistive technologies, impaired no longer means disabled.

The Paralympic Games open on September 7th; they are a visible example of how powerful and pervasive assistive technology has become. This month, we’re asking: what is the most innovative assistive technology application you’ve seen?  We are looking for the most well thought out answer to this question in up to 150 words: use the comment feature below the blog and please feel free to promote your research!  The winner will receive an Amazon gift certificate worth $50 and a bag full of Mendeley items; competition closes September 28th.

Powerful and Pervasive Technologies

Assistive technologies are diminishing physical limitations.  During the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, the delegates were addressed by Rep. Tammy Duckworth of Illinois.  She strode to and from the podium, fully mobile, despite having lost her legs while serving in the military.

The forthcoming Paralympic Games are another powerful illustration that impairment does not mean disabled: competition is conducted at the highest level.  New materials (such as carbon fibre) combined with engineering nous have created products such as the “Flex-Foot Cheetahwhich enable athletes to run who could not otherwise have walked. Other technologies compensate for the absence or impairment of senses.

For the Elderly Too

These technologies also assist the elderly. A “Smart Walker”, for example, can have a range of functionality including an “Advanced human–machine interface” in addition to providing physical support. (Martins et al., 2012, p. 555) One type of “Smart Walker” is the “SIMBIOSIS”: “This walker presents a multisensory biomechanical platform for predictive human–machine cooperation….the forces that are applied by the user on each forearm-support while walking are measured and the guidance information can be inferred. This turns out to be a natural and transparent interface that does not need previous training by the user.” (Martins et al., 2012, p. 558)

The Future?

It’s clear that assistive technology is enhancing lives, but what is the most innovative application you’ve encountered?  Tell us!

Try Elsevier DataSearch!

DataSearch results
Partial results for DataSearch lookup for “Flex-foot Cheetah”

Note: much more information for researchers can be found via Elsevier Datasearch (https://datasearch.elsevier.com/):  DataSearch works with reputable repositories across the Internet to help researchers readily find the data sets they need to accelerate their work. DataSearch offers a new and innovative approach.  Most search engines don’t actively involve their users in making them better; we invite you, the user, to join our User Panel and advise how we can improve the results.  We are looking for researchers in a variety of fields, no technical expertise is required (though welcomed).  In order to join us, visit https://datasearch.elsevier.com and click on the button marked “Join Our User Panel”.

About Mendeley Brainstorms

Our Brainstorms are challenges so we can engage with you, our users, on the hottest topics in the world of research.  We look for the most in-depth and well thought through responses; the best response as judged by the Mendeley team will earn a prize.

References

MARTINS, M., SANTOS, C., FRIZERA-NETO, A. and CERES, R. (2012). Assistive mobility devices focusing on Smart Walkers: Classification and review. Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 60(4), pp.548-562.

Össur Americas. (2016) Flex-Foot Cheetah. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.ossur.com/prosthetic-solutions/products/sport-solutions/cheetah. [Accessed 10 August 2016].