Posts Tagged ‘Mendeley API’

23 September 2011 by Jason Hoyt

One of the big reasons we created the Open APIs into Mendeley data was because we knew we’d never have the time or resources to create everything that you want and we want. Having Mendeley on mobile devices is obviously a big need. That’s why it is great to see third party developers take our APIs and build either full out Mendeley clients, or tiny apps that perform a specific task on a mobile device. Some developers have also tapped into the local storage to build apps. In no particular order then, here are several apps that you can start using on Android enabled devices: (more…)

8 March 2011 by William

developer resources design research tools connecting research disciplines  Build an app with Mendeley data, make research more open, win $10,001!developer resources design research tools connecting research disciplines  Build an app with Mendeley data, make research more open, win $10,001!We at Mendeley have now built one of the world’s largest open research catalogs, containing over 70 million documents. This is no small feat, considering we’ve only been at it for about 2 years, and we couldn’t have done it without you (nearly a million of you!).  By bringing control of research data back to the community, we hope to make research more collaborative, open, and efficient. If you’ve ever thought, “You know, I really wish I could search the literature better” or “Wouldn’t it be cool if I could see how this idea evolved over time?” or just “I wish I had $10,001 dollars”, well, now’s your chance. (more…)

22 September 2010 by Jason Hoyt

mendeley use case  Another researcher index? ReaderMeter looks to answer with Mendeley

Editor’s note: This is a guest crosspost from Dario Taraborelli who created the ReaderMeter application on top of the Mendeley API. Dario also blogs at Academic Productivity. He asked if he could talk a bit about citation metrics. Over to Dario….

Readers of this blog are not new to my ramblings on soft peer review, social metrics and post-publication impact measures:

  • how can we measure the impact of scientific research based on usage data from collaborative annotation systems, social bookmarking services and social media?
  • should we expect major discrepancies between citation-based and readership-based impact measures?
  • are online reference management systems more robust a data source to study scholarly readership than traditional usage factors (e.g. downloads, clickthrough rates etc.)?

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